The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 20, 1876
    About the Sunday Concerts. (Mailed In)

    To the Editor of the Illinois Staats-Zeitung:

    The remarks made recently by a "music and family friend" could only have been inspired by malice, or he would not have attacked the recently resumed concerts. Had his intention been to correct improprieties he could have spoken to those in charge. But no, he speaks instead of rival concerts, to which the better class Germans would go. Who belongs to this better class of Germans, if, like our "music friend," it looks down with such contempt on the visitors to the Turner Hall concerts. It is not the intention of the Turngemeinde to give drawing room concerts but popular concerts as is clearly indicated by the low 10 cents admission fee. The smoking is done by the better class of Germans, who stayed away from concerts as long as smoking was forbidden. The Turngemeinde will always insist on decency in its members and will try to preserve the good name of its halls. -- Jos. Kaufmann, Member of the Chicago Turngemeinde

    To the Editor of the Illinois Staats-Zeitung: The remarks made recently by a "music and family friend" could only have been inspired by malice, or he would not have attacked ...

    German
    II A 3 b, III B 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- November 13, 1876
    [Sunday Concert in Turner Hall]

    Yesterday's Sunday concert in the Turner Hall was well attended and the public listened with pleasure to the performance of the band under the direction of Mr. Jos. Clauder. As long as Mr. Clauder offers a selection of pieces similar to the one he chose yesterday he may rely on an attentive audience. The attempt to play classical or heavy concert music would be courting failure, to judge by the type of audience. Even Thomas found it difficult to lift his concerts in Central Park, New York, above the level of ordinary entertainment music. Mr. Clauder seems to be following the example of Thomas. What he produces is popular easily understood music.

    To be mentioned especially from yesterday's performance, is the overture to "Stradella." The audience otherwise always so noisy and restless kept perfectly quiet while it was played.

    Yesterday's Sunday concert in the Turner Hall was well attended and the public listened with pleasure to the performance of the band under the direction of Mr. Jos. Clauder. As ...

    German
    II A 3 b, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- November 16, 1876
    [First Concert of the Season]

    There is a music loving public among the 20,000 Germans of the Southwest Side, a public numerous enough to support a number of good concerts through-out the winter. The well-known music teacher, Mr. Emil Zott, will give the first concert tonight in the Vorwarts Turner Hall. Admission tickets will be sold at the entrance. The program is as follows:

    Part I.

    1. Overture to the opera "Martha."

    2. "Der Blumen Rache," - V. Nessler.

    3. Aria from "La Favorita."

    4. "Die Stille Wasserrose," - Abt.

    5. Bridal Choir from "Lohengrin."

    2

    Part II.

    6. "When Night Involves the Skies," - Mendelssohn.

    7. "The Wanderer." - Fesca

    8. "Morgen Wandering." - Hauptmann

    9. Quartette for four horns, arranged by Hoffmann.

    Part III.

    10. "Schneeglockchen." Alexander Dorn.

    11. "Liebschen ist da." - August Horn.

    12. "Standchen." - Aby.

    13. Potponrri from "Il Trovatore," - Verdi.

    There is a music loving public among the 20,000 Germans of the Southwest Side, a public numerous enough to support a number of good concerts through-out the winter. The well-known ...

    German
    II A 3 b
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- November 20, 1876
    [Sunday Concerts in Turner Hall]

    The Sunday concerts in the North Side Turner Hall are continuously gaining in popularity. Yesterday's concert was very well attended. The band played in a masterful manner. A remarkable accomplishment was Lumbye's "Traumbilder." The band proved its good schooling and Mr. Clauder his great ability in the performance of the "Tell Overture." The public did not spare its applause. The attention was frequently so intense that the tinkling of glasses and conversation stopped completely.

    The Sunday concerts in the North Side Turner Hall are continuously gaining in popularity. Yesterday's concert was very well attended. The band played in a masterful manner. A remarkable accomplishment ...

    German
    II A 3 b
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- December 05, 1876
    Fedelia Singer Club Concert.

    The Fidelia Club last night celebrated its fourth anniversary. The Choir sang "La Somnabula" by Bellini and the "Evening Song" by V. Nessler. The Male Choir was a credit to its conductor, Mr. Heinrich von Oppen.

    The dramatic section of the club presented the comedy, "I Am the Physician," or "Castor and Pollux." The best families of the North Side attended the festivities.

    The Fidelia Club last night celebrated its fourth anniversary. The Choir sang "La Somnabula" by Bellini and the "Evening Song" by V. Nessler. The Male Choir was a credit to ...

    German
    II B 1 a, II B 1 c 1, II A 3 b, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 19, 1877
    [Sunday Concert]

    The Sunday concert in the North Side Turner Hall attracted a great crowd yesterday. The better class of Germans was well represented and paid a friendly tribute to the efforts of Mr. Clauder. But the audience was not only composed of Germans, as many Americans could also be found there. Seldom has an audience been so captivated by music, when eating and drinking was supposed to be the main entertainment. The potpourri from Weber's Freischutz held the people spellbound. Even an admirer of Wagner must have been forced to revise his opinion, that there was no German music previous to him, when he noticed the silence of this big crowd. There was not the least sound nor the slightest disturbance. The facial expressions betrayed the deep emotion with which people listened to the magic melodies of the German composer. Even the waiters whose steps otherwise were often so disturbing, were leaning motionless against 2the columns until the last notes had died away. So spellbound was the audience, that almost a full minute elapsed before the applause rang out. Music talks to the German heart and even when he hears it for the first time on distant shores he comes under the spell of the melodies from his old fatherland.

    The Sunday concert in the North Side Turner Hall attracted a great crowd yesterday. The better class of Germans was well represented and paid a friendly tribute to the efforts ...

    German
    II A 3 b, I C
  • Der Westen -- March 18, 1877
    The Ill-Fated Symphony Concerts.

    Any friend of good music must feel deeply sorry that Mr. A. Liesegang has been unable to put his idea into execution of giving, this winter, a series of symphony concerts. Although we do not wish to take sides in the dispute between him and the musicians, we cannot help believing that the basic cause is professional jealousy. It is possible that it was only instinctive, but the fact is, that the musicians, instead of giving Mr. Liesegang a helping hand, piled up difficulties in his path. A few musicians admit that the newly created musicians' association was found solely for that purpose.

    This is a regrettable situation, not only because the public has thus been deprived of the performance of musical masterpieces but also for the sake of the musicians themselves.

    2

    Since Balatka's departure, no conductor has been found as yet, able and willing to train an orchestra for that purpose. Mr. Wolfsohn is spending his activity in another direction and Mr. Clander has not had the courage as yet, to tackle the performance of symphonies. Mr. Liesegang comes, is willing to undertake it and at once jealousy sprouts forth in the hearts of German musicians and the undertaking ends in a fiasco. It seems to us, that it is more pleasant and honorable for an able musician to play to a select and musically trained audience than to have the melodies of his instrument accompanied by the clatter of dishes and the tinkling of glasses. It seems to us that if a talented musician is forced to play in a beer garden in order to make a living, there is something wrong somewhere. It would have been to the best interest of the musicians themselves to support the undertaking of Mr. Liesegang.

    Any friend of good music must feel deeply sorry that Mr. A. Liesegang has been unable to put his idea into execution of giving, this winter, a series of symphony ...

    German
    II A 3 b, IV
  • Chicago Tribune -- March 23, 1877
    Ole Bull Serenade by the Norwegians

    The gilded walls of the promenade corridor in the Grand Pacific Hotel, echoed, yesterday evening, with simple Norwegian songs. As was previously announced, a serenade was given to the famous master of the violin, Ole Bull, by a number of his admiring countrymen in this city. At about 9:30 o'clock, the "Norwegian Singing Society" grouped outside of the hotel at the Clark Street corner, and without delay struck up the familiar air "Hoja Noer". They followed this with "Wir Har Bort Lenkens Wingar". At its conclusion the vocalists were summoned into the hotel, and on arriving in the corridor they were met by Ole Bull and G. B. Carpenter, who introduced all parties. Mr. Bull shook hands with each member of the society, and after completing the rounds acknowledged the compliment shown him in a brief speech.

    2

    He said he was heartily glad to see so many friends, old and new, and wanted to tell them how thankful he was for their encouraging aid and friendship. Speaking in a low voice, yet one full of meanings, Mr. Bull referred to the history of the Norwegian race in America, which race had always been foremost in the cause of liberty. He hoped they would keep on the same honorable road and keep the flag hoisted. They were a truly united people having fewer prejudices of caste than any other nationality, and it was good for the country that it had such a people. After toiling many years against obstacles of poverty and sickness, they had at length risen to a nation so important, that no American of intelligence could overlook them.

    The Society then sang "Ossian", and soon afterward dispersed. The whole affair was informal and exceedingly pleasant.

    The gilded walls of the promenade corridor in the Grand Pacific Hotel, echoed, yesterday evening, with simple Norwegian songs. As was previously announced, a serenade was given to the famous ...

    Norwegian
    II A 3 b, II B 1 a
  • Hejmdal -- January 29, 1878
    (No headline)

    Freja's Concert on the 26th day of December was a great success. Twelve hundred people were present, and all complimented the singers. Miss Emma Larsen was excellent as the soloist.

    After the concert there was a ball lasting until dawn.

    Freja's Concert on the 26th day of December was a great success. Twelve hundred people were present, and all complimented the singers. Miss Emma Larsen was excellent as the soloist. ...

    Danish
    II A 3 b
  • Hejmdal -- January 29, 1878
    (No headline)

    Freja's Concert on the 26th day of December was a great success. Twelve hundred people were present, and all complimented the singers. Miss Emma Larsen was excellent as the soloist.

    After the concert there was a ball lasting until dawn.

    Freja's Concert on the 26th day of December was a great success. Twelve hundred people were present, and all complimented the singers. Miss Emma Larsen was excellent as the soloist. ...

    Danish
    II A 3 b