The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 23, 1872
    [Political Matters]

    At the place of Emil Dietzsch, East Randolph Street, a meeting was held yesterday, in order to elect delegates for the Reunion and Reform Convention at Cincinnati. (Attendance being extremely small, a discussion ensued if the meeting should elect delegates).

    Mr. Ruhbaum:

    I am not surprised that so few are present, today, because the call was not published in the Illinois Staats Zeitung, and so naturally only a very small part of the Chicago Germans were informed of the meeting. But time is short and the delegates should be elected, today, and from among those present.

    2

    Mr. Emil Dietzsch:

    I hardly know an intelligent German who is not in sympathy with us. But it is undeniable that at present a certain lethargy prevails among the Chicago Germans. The absence of many therefore should not be construed as disagreement. (In exact count of those present at that time, waiters and reporters of six papers included netted the impressive number of twenty-eight).

    After a protracted discussion a motion was carried to hold a mass meeting, Thursday, in the Turn Hall, - after Hermann Lieb had pledged himself to get the necessary funds from his American friends. In expectation that the mass meeting would be largely American the twenty-eight present elected ten German delegates without loss of time.

    At the place of Emil Dietzsch, East Randolph Street, a meeting was held yesterday, in order to elect delegates for the Reunion and Reform Convention at Cincinnati. (Attendance being extremely ...

    German
    I F 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 21, 1873
    Encouragement for the Chicago German Movement.

    The union of the Germans of Chicago in order to fight Puritanism and nativism attracts widespread attention. Especially great is the sympathy in Indiana where the Germans have the same fight on their hands. The Indianapolis Daily Telegraph has this to say: "The increasing rottenness in our public affairs, the guardianship imposed on the Germans, is not felt any deeper in Chicago than it is here. The union of all the Germans irrespective of their political views fills with the highest hope." The Michigan Journal says: "Since it is possible that the free minded citizens of all the states will eventually unite against the fanatics and Puritans, it is important to watch closely the Chicago movement." The Louisville Informer says: "This policy of union is practical and sensible. It is this policy which has given the fanatics victory, although they are in the minority." The Cincinnati Courier says: "The fight of the Germans of Chicago assumes constantly greater proportions. The Germans of all the United States are watching with the greatest interest the result of this strange fight."

    The union of the Germans of Chicago in order to fight Puritanism and nativism attracts widespread attention. Especially great is the sympathy in Indiana where the Germans have the same ...

    German
    I F 1, I F 2, I B 2, I C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 31, 1873
    The German American Central Association of Chicago.

    Under this name has been created by the delegates of the German War organizations and German associations a German central organization for Chicago. This is the first unifying accomplishment since the beginning of the war against the Puritans.

    The agitation and platform committees created by the German Central Association are composed of such men that one may expect a speedy solution of the most important matters. The most important matter for the moment is the making up of a liberal platform on which all the adversaries of Puritanism can agree.

    Under this name has been created by the delegates of the German War organizations and German associations a German central organization for Chicago. This is the first unifying accomplishment since ...

    German
    I F 2, I B 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 26, 1873
    The German-American Central Association.

    Mr. Rosenthal, as President of the Agitation Committee, had Philip Stein read to the assembly the platform worked out by the committee.

    The Platform.

    Resolved: The Civil Service of the Federal, State, and local governments has become a mere instrument of party tyranny. We consider a reform of the Civil Service as a matter of great importance.

    Resolved: That the actual conditions of public finances make it imperative to administer the city and county expenditures in the most economical manner.

    Resolved: That the education of youth is the most effective means to prevent crime and that the erection of a sufficient number of schools is one of the most urgent needs of the city.

    Resolved: That we consider it to be in opposition to our institutions to arrest some one for a misdemeanor punishable by a fine. In such a case a summons satisfies 2every just and legal purpose. All laws and ordinances to the contrary should be abolished.

    Resolved: That neither the State, County, nor City police has the right to impose on one part of the population the views of another part of the population, as to how to attain happiness in this life and in the hereafter.

    In consideration of present conditions we agree, that on Sundays business places and amusements should be so limited as not to interfere with religious services, but we deny one part of the population the right to dictate to the other part of the population about how to celebrate Sunday.

    Resolved: That temperance is to be recommended and intemperance to be opposed. We suggest the planting of vineyards and the reduction of taxes on wine and beer. All publicly sold beverages should be inspected, and if adulterated should be confiscated and their owner punished.

    Resolved: That we recommend an ordinance, which would forbid the granting of a license for saloons, loan places and fruit stands to persons of ill repute.

    3

    Resolved: That we consider as a basic principle, that each one can be responsible only for his own actions. We recommend the repeal of the legislation, which makes the owner responsible for the actions of a tenant who has rented the place for honest purposes.

    Resolved: That we recommend these resolutions to each and every citizen. We invite every one to join this movement, so that we may regain our fundamental rights and liberties as citizens.

    The platform upon recommendation of Mr. Nickoff was accepted unanimously.

    General Lieb announced that 9,000 copies of the Liberal American are waiting to reproduce the platform.

    Mr. Rosenthal, as President of the Agitation Committee, had Philip Stein read to the assembly the platform worked out by the committee. The Platform. Resolved: The Civil Service of the ...

    German
    I F 3, I B 2, I F 2, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 21, 1873
    New Allies

    Last Friday a meeting of forty gentlemen of the Independent Citizens took place at the Pacific Hotel. They appointed a committee which last Saturday made the nominations, and in consequence of these nominations several members left the convention.

    Yesterday afternoon a meeting took place in which the committee was supposed to make its report. Present were Edmund Jussen, Richard F. Banmann, Seeberger, Jae, Beiersdorf, (G. Schneider, Louis Wahl, L. J Kadisch, and Jos. Huhn were represented by other Germans), T. A. Horan, O. C. Bonfield, fol. Rickerby, H. O. Collins, George R. Hall, George D. Barrett,R. Kelsey Reed, W. Allstrom, B. Callaghan.

    C. C. Bonfield was elected chairman. Edmund Jussen said in his speeck: "In the absence of the chairman of the committee, I take the liberty to make the report. As a German American I must protest against the proceeding of the committee. They have dared to do at this convention, what has never been attempted in any organized community in which Germans were living. Not only have the Germans been 2completely ignored in the nominations, but the office promised them has been given to their most rabid enemy. To make matters worse, to soften our resentment, the office of city attorney is given to the Germans by a later nomination. It is an insult, if you believe you can thus win us.

    "I consider it a tragedy that the election will be fought according to nationalities; but since it must be so, better now than later.

    It is my opinion that if the liberal Americans and the liberal Irish join the Hesing - O'Hara party, we can then expect a tremendous victory." Col. Rickerby said, that in his opinion the Germans had been treated shabbily, that he would not support a ticket which excludes any nationality. A. T. Moran said, that Jussen complained about the treatment given the Germans. He could make the same complaint in regard to the Irish. How did they go about the splitting of the Hesing O'Hara party? By throwing out all the Germans and Irish. It is true two Irishmen were nominated but they are Republicans and cannot thus represent the Irish who are mostly Democrats.

    Mr. Callahan endorses the protest, so do Mr. Bonfield and Collins.

    3

    The meeting is adjourned.

    Last Friday a meeting of forty gentlemen of the Independent Citizens took place at the Pacific Hotel. They appointed a committee which last Saturday made the nominations, and in consequence ...

    German
    I F 2, I C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- November 05, 1873
    A Sedan for the Knownothings

    Sedan! The election is over and the enemy is beaten. His strongest fortifications have fallen into our hands. The people's party has won. It is still impossible for the moment to say how great our victory is. All our friends have stood by us; the Irish in the entire city; the Bohemians in the 8th ward; the Scandinavians in the 11th and 16th wards; the French and the Poles in the 7th and 9th wards.

    The campaign committee of the People's Party, rented in the afternoon, when victory was certain, the lower hall in the Kingsbury Block. By 7 P. M. an immense crowd had assembled there, A description of the jubilation is impossible. At 8:30 o'clock A. C. Hesing went to the meeting. He received a thunderous reception. In his speech A. C. Hesing told the audience that the following telegram had been sent to Mayor Medill:

    Joseph Medill,

    Fer address of the American Embassy,

    Paris.

    2

    "Your policy has been defeated by ten thousand majority."

    Rehm and Hesing.

    Sedan! The election is over and the enemy is beaten. His strongest fortifications have fallen into our hands. The people's party has won. It is still impossible for the moment ...

    German
    I F 2, I F 4, I C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 16, 1874
    A Mixed Assembly.

    Tax inspector and mailman Francis Rodmann convoked yesterday a meeting in the restaurant of Fritz Frillmann, in order to organize the Republican Party of the North side.

    Mr. Barker, candidate for the legislature, described the sufferings of the negro in the south.

    Rodman as next speaker said he would like to talk about a man who claims to be a friend of the laboring class, but who isn't, namely A. C. Hesing. A man who drives every Sunday to Lincoln park in a stolen coach..... This was the end of Rodmann's speech and of the meeting. The majority of the assembly cried out: "You rascal, no calumny. Every one knows that A. C. Hesing's coach is a gift."

    During the ensuing confusion the meeting was adjourned.

    Tax inspector and mailman Francis Rodmann convoked yesterday a meeting in the restaurant of Fritz Frillmann, in order to organize the Republican Party of the North side. Mr. Barker, candidate ...

    German
    I F 2, I H, IV
  • Chicago Times -- October 27, 1874
    Danish Republicans.

    (Tues. 1:5) A meeting of Danish citizens residing in the Eleventh Ward was held at 104 Milwaukee Avenue for the purpose of organizing a Republican Club. C.W.Woodman was chosen temporary chairman, and Mr. Andrew H.Smith kept the records. Messrs. Harrison, Lurrinson and Howman were elected as the executive committee. Mr. Woodman addressed a few brief remarks to the one hundred voters present.

    Mr. Allstross was called upon, and the chairman stated that he suspected the gentleman was an oppositionist, but if he would speak good Republican principles, he might take the floor. Mr. Allstross said he was a "Dansk," and claimed the right to say what he pleased. He started out on a first-class Scandinavian oration, but proved to be too heretical in his views, and the president began to knock the table with his knuckles in order to call the gentlemen to order. But Mr. Allstross would not be put down so easily. He insisted on saying what he had to say, then and there. Then the crowd began to take sides with one party 2and the other, and there seemed to be a right lively chance for a gentle row. The bar-tender came to the rescue, and after bouncing one or two of the more noisy ones, order was restored again. Mr. Allstross subsided.

    Mr. C.F.Periolat next took the floor, and made a few remarks about the American flag, proving himself about as successful a speechmaker as a bartender. He assured those present that he had been a Democrat until after the Republican Party came into power, and then be became a Republican. He now honestly hated the Democratic Party. It had no bottom to it.

    (Tues. 1:5) A meeting of Danish citizens residing in the Eleventh Ward was held at 104 Milwaukee Avenue for the purpose of organizing a Republican Club. C.W.Woodman was chosen temporary ...

    Danish
    I F 2
  • Hejmdal -- February 27, 1875
    [The Local Socialists and Communists]

    We are rather surprised to see how the Socialists and Communists talk and criticize the government of Chicago in general. They are always attacking the Relief and Aid Society with the same complaint, that the donations to the needy people are insufficient and are not of much benefit. They made up their minds, at a big mass meeting, that the officers of the Society should be discharged and that the Socialists and Communists should run the relief office. The present leaders of those on relief are dishonest; as we all can see, the whole affair is "red". Nothing came of it. Last Thursday a mass of people were outside the relief station, mostly Communists, but there was no battle.

    We are rather surprised to see how the Socialists and Communists talk and criticize the government of Chicago in general. They are always attacking the Relief and Aid Society with ...

    Danish
    I E, I D 2 c, I F 2, I H
  • Hejmdal -- February 27, 1875
    [Socialists and Communists]

    We are rather surprised to see how the Socialists and Communists talk and criticize the government of Chicago in general. They are always attacking the Relief and Aid Societies with the same complaint, that the donations to the needy people are insufficient and are not of much benefit. They made up their minds at a big mass meeting, that the office holders of the Society should be discharged and the Socialists and Communists run the Relief office. At present the leaders of the relief are dishonest, as we all can see, the whole affair is Red. Nothing came of it. Last Thursday a mass of people were outside the Relief Station, mostly Communists, but there was no battle.

    We are rather surprised to see how the Socialists and Communists talk and criticize the government of Chicago in general. They are always attacking the Relief and Aid Societies with ...

    Danish
    I F 2