The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 09, 1867
    Yesterday's Primary Election

    Following is the result of the Republican primary election which was held yesterday:

    First Ward: Jacob Beiersdorf, George W. Fritz, Peter Regitz, Nimrod Walz, Delegates; [Translator's note: Twelve other names are omitted.] Joshua Knickerbocker, Alderman; George Hartmann, Constable.

    Second Ward: August Neuhaus, Christian Schell, Johann Schroeder, Karl H. Ham, Delegates; [Translator's note: Eleven other names are omitted.] Arthur Dixon, Alderman; Charles McLane, Constable.

    Third Ward: Joseph Pollock, Karl Rose, Philipp Becker, Delegates; [Translator's note: Twelve other names are omitted.] Karl Wicker, Alderman; Sayville Scott, Constable.

    2

    Fourth Ward: Conrad Seipp, C. Wahl, Delegates; [Translator's note: Nine other names are omitted.] Sam McCoy, Alderman; W. C. Hendricks, Constable.

    Fifth Ward: William Hausen, Paskal Schneider, Christ Eigenmann, Delegates; [Translator's note: Two other names are omitted.] John Raber, Alderman; Peter Murphy, Constable.

    Sixth Ward: William Blanke, William Ruehl, Fred Haertig, Delegates; [Translator's note: Three other names are omitted.] Friedrich Burkhardt, Alderman; A. B. Chladeck, Constable.

    Seventh Ward: Albert Kubeck, Christ Techtmeyer, John Schenk, Delegates; [Translator's note: Six other names are omitted.] John McAllister, Alderman; William Zschokke, Constable.

    Eighth Ward: Fred Maas, N. Schneider, Jacob Link, Delegates; [Translator's note: Two other names are omitted.] Isaac Wentworth, Alderman; Fred Haucke, Constable.

    3

    Ninth Ward: William Schade, Delegate; [Translator's note: Fourteen other names are omitted.] W. R. Carpenter, Alderman; Cyrus Keeler, Constable.

    Tenth Ward: Andrew Wemple, Otto Dehling, U. Lochbieler, Delegates; [Translator's note: Nine other names are omitted.] Edmund Bixby, Alderman; Joel Lull, Constable.

    Eleventh Ward: Henry Ackhoff, Edward S. Salomon, Charles Muenzer, H. Gade, Delegates; [Translator's note: Seven other names are omitted.] S. J. Russel, Alderman; G. Stirling, Constable.

    Twelfth Ward: August Steinhaus, Fred Yoltz, Henry Schroeder, Clement Hirsch, Louis Schultze, Delegates; [Translator's note: Two other names are omitted.] O. W. Potter, Alderman; Fred Zschokke, Constable.

    Thirteenth Ward: Conrad Voltz, Gustave Fischer, K. G. Schmidt, Delegates; [Translator's note: Three other names are omitted.] George J. Beebe, Alderman; 4Nicholas Dries, Constable.

    Fourteenth Ward: Christian Paesch, Johann Batten, John Laubmann, Henry Schlottinger, John Hettinger, Charles Goebel, A. L. Berger, E. Albert, F. C. Gerbing, Delegates; Philipp Steinmueller, Alderman; Karl Hahn, Constable.

    Fifteenth Ward: Joseph Huhn, Jacob Enders, Peter Memel, Delegates; [Translator's note: Eight other names are omitted.] Fred Buchanan, Alderman; Philip Paul, Constable.

    Sixteenth Ward: George Oertel, Adam Baierle, Fred Metzke, H. Kaufmann, G. A. Busse, Delegates; [Translator's note: Twelve other names are omitted.] D. H. Lincoln, Alderman; Christ Gragen, Constable.

    Following is the result of the Republican primary election which was held yesterday: First Ward: Jacob Beiersdorf, George W. Fritz, Peter Regitz, Nimrod Walz, Delegates; [Translator's note: Twelve other names ...

    German
    I F 4, I F 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 14, 1867
    Captain E. F. C. Klokke (Editorial)

    Captain E. F. C. Klokke, a soldier who served in the old Hecker Regiment (Twenty-fourth Illinois) has agreed to accede to the wishes of his friends and become a candidate for the office of Clerk of the Superior Court.

    Captain Klokke was a brave soldier, according to the unanimous opinion of his comrades in arms and superior officers. He is a loyal Republican, and a sworn enemy of all fanatics and advocates of temperance. He is able and ambitious, respected as a citizen and soldier, and deserves the support of all true Republicans. We heartily recommend him to our voters.

    Captain E. F. C. Klokke, a soldier who served in the old Hecker Regiment (Twenty-fourth Illinois) has agreed to accede to the wishes of his friends and become a candidate ...

    German
    I F 1, I F 5, I B 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 23, 1867
    The Election (Editorial)

    On page eight of this newspaper there is a list of members of the County and the ward Committees which are to manage the coming campaign. It is evident that only experienced Republicans have been chosen, and they may be relied upon to put forth their best efforts in attaining favorable results for the party. The County Campaign Committee will meet every morning to receive reports and announcements from the Ward Committees.

    The outcome of the October elections in Ohio and Pennsylvania has given this year's County election an importance that it would not normally have. Chicago is the citadel of the Liberty party in the Northwest. Our opponents will do everything they possibly can to gain a victory here, so that they may noise it abroad to prove their statement that "the attitude of the 2people has undergone a change. Even a considerable decrease in the Republican majority, or the defeat of one of the Republican candidates would greatly encourage the Democrats and exercise a depressive influence upon the Liberty party in our own state and in the other states of the Northwest."

    We may be confident that the German Republicans of Chicago do not want to see the Republican majority in Cook County diminished by a lukewarm attitude. For unlike their brothers in other states, they have no just reason to be dissatisfied with their English-speaking companions. Not one of the prominent local Republicans of American birth who stand high in the councils of the party is in favor of temperance or the Sunday laws advocated by a few party adherents who will have no influence whatever if the party itself does not split. There is no party strife in regard to the so-called blue laws in Chicago as there is in New York. Moreover, there is complete harmony on all principal issues. And as far as participation by Germans in the 3administration of public offices is concerned, it is probably greater today than at any previous time; it is greater in Chicago than in any other large city of the United States, as is apparent from the many German names that appear on the County, Ward, and Township tickets. It was pointed out recently that with the exception of one person, every German who was nominated at this year's convention was elected.

    It will depend principally upon the efforts and the zeal of the Germans whether or not Chicago, in contrast to other cities, will prove to be an impregnable fortress against the onslaughts of the reactionaries in the November election.

    On page eight of this newspaper there is a list of members of the County and the ward Committees which are to manage the coming campaign. It is evident that ...

    German
    I B 1, I B 2, I F 1, I F 5
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 14, 1868
    Inspectors and Places of Registration

    Following is a list of places of registration and supervising inspectors of election.

    First Ward--First District

    Inspectors--Simon W. King, B. B. Tuttle, S. S. Benjamin. Place of registration--49 Wabash Avenue.

    First Ward--Second District

    Inspectors--Charles F. Chilson, Peter Regitz, A. Banyon. Place of registration--98 South Wells Street.

    Second Ward--First District

    Inspectors--W. T. Hancock, Isaac Howland, C. C. Garber. Place of registration--Southwest corner of State and Van Buren Streets.

    2

    Second Ward--Second District

    Inspectors--Joseph Butler, William H. Young, Anton Berg. Place of registration--Northwest corner of Van Buren and Sherman Streets.

    Third Ward--First District

    Inspectors--John D. Jennings, Joseph Pollock, George A. Meech. Place of registration--Taylor Street, in the rear of 504 State Street.

    Third Ward--Second District

    Inspectors--N. S. Bouton, E. R. Fowler, Dr. Hahn.

    Fourth Ward--First District

    Inspectors--George C. Morton, W. R. Schroeder, R. A. B. Mills. Place of registration--Buell House, southeast corner of State and 22nd Streets.

    Fourth Ward--Second District

    Inspectors--W. P. Comstock, Morgan, L. Keith, Samuel Boerger. Place of 3registration--Old Engine Number Nine, corner Cottage Grove Avenue and 26th Street.

    Fifth Ward--First District

    Inspectors--Henry Schmitz, Henry Morris, John Bannon. Place of registration--680 Archer Avenue.

    Fifth Ward--Second District

    Inspectors--James Clary, Thomas McMahon, Christian Freund. Place of registration--131 Archer Avenue.

    Sixth Ward--First District

    Inspectors--B. G. Gill, Nicholas Linden, William Jauncey. Place of registration--Maxwell Street Engine House.

    Sixth Ward--Second District

    Inspectors--W. W. Washburne, B. Weichselbaum, Anton Schaefer. Place of 4registration--Home of Michal Fitzgerald, northwest corner of Polk and Canal Streets.

    Seventh Ward--First District

    Inspectors--George Heart, Christian Tegtmeyer, Gotthard Schaaf. Place of registration--Corner of Mitchell and Union Streets.

    Seventh Ward--Second District

    Inspectors--A. Bruening, William Frazier, Edward Murphy. Place of registration--Blue Island Avenue Engine House.

    Eighth Ward--First District

    Inspectors--R.P. Deerickson, Michael Reddinger, Theodore Clowry. Place of registration--Corner of Blue Island Avenue and Sampson Street.

    Eighth Ward--Second District Inspectors--R. M. Guilford, William Boehmer, W. I. Onahan. Place of registration 5--Home of James Bridgeman, Polk Street near Centre Avenue.

    Ninth Ward--First District

    Inspectors--H. Weinkopp, Samuel McColter, Daniel Worthington. Place of registration--Washingtonian Home.

    Ninth Ward--Second District

    Inspectors--A. St. John Campbell, Thomes McNamara, J. Pike. Place of registration--West Lake Street Engine House.

    Tenth Ward--First District

    Inspectors--Pleasant Amick, A. G. Loewe, Hiram M. Chase. Place of registration --West Jackson Street Engine House, between Clinton and Jefferson Streets.

    Tenth Ward--Second District

    Inspectors--Alvin Salisbury, George W. Bohannon, A. L. Amberg. Place of 6registration--Engine House, corner Washington and Clinton Streets.

    Eleventh Ward--First District

    Inspectors--William Weimann, George Morey, Henry Grace. Place of registration--Corner of Carroll and Desplaines Streets.

    Eleventh Ward--Second District

    Inspectors--Peter McGinnis, A. L. Bennett, A. W. Klein. Place of registration--Corner of Halsted and West Indiana Streets.

    Twelfth Ward--First District

    Inspectors--Charles H. Duensing, Louis Schultz, A. O. Bryan. Place of registration--336 Milwaukee Avenue.

    Twelfth Ward--Second District

    Inspectors--James McGrath, W. G. Sturtevant, H. Thies. Place of registration-- 7421 Elston Road.

    Thirteenth Ward--First District

    Inspectors--Fred Bensinger, Eben Woodruff, Henry Rose. Place of registration--Engine House on Larrabee Street near North Avenue.

    Thirteenth Ward--Second District

    Inspectors--Thomas Shirely, Peter Mahr, James Curry. Place of registration--(not given).

    Fourteenth Ward--First District

    Inspectors--Robert Engel, Louis Berger, John McHughn. Place of registration--Corner of Larrabee Street and Clybourne Avenue.

    Fourteenth Ward--Second District

    Inspectors--Henry Jahns, Philipp Steinmueller, John Ries. Place of registration--Fritz Frillmann's Saloon, corner of Division and Wells Streets.

    8

    Fifteenth Ward--First District

    Inspectors--Henry Wendt, J. C. Grant, Dr. Boyer. Place of registration--North-west corner of Chicago Avenue and Wells Street.

    Fifteenth Ward--Second District

    Inspectors--William McClark, W. S. Golsen, Lorenz Baer. Place of registration --Corner of Rush Street and Chicago Avenue.

    Sixteenth Ward--First District

    Inspectors--Joseph Briggs, Elihu Granger, Andrew Nelson. Place of registration --Corner of Franklin and Indiana Streets.

    Sixteenth Ward--Second District

    Inspectors--Fred Heintze, Martin Green, Patrick Smith. Place of registration --North Market Hall.

    Following is a list of places of registration and supervising inspectors of election. First Ward--First District Inspectors--Simon W. King, B. B. Tuttle, S. S. Benjamin. Place of registration--49 Wabash Avenue. ...

    German
    I F 1, I F 4
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 30, 1868
    Delegates to the Republican County Convention

    Election of delegates to the Republican County Convention which will meet tomorrow in the room of the Recorder's Court was held in yesterday's primary. Following is the result:

    First Ward

    Peter Regitz, Isaac Pflaum. [Translator's note: The names of eight men are omitted.]

    Second Ward

    Henry Schleuning, Joseph Sicher. [Translator's note: The names of six other men are omitted.]

    Third Ward

    Patrick Wagner, Louis Wahl, Joseph Doktor, Albert Reiners. [Translator's note: 2The names of four other men are omitted.]

    Fourth Ward

    O. A. Schultz, Otto Bluhm. [Translator's note: The names of eight other men are omitted.]

    Fifth Ward

    G. T. Kolbe, M. Schlumbrecht, O. Eigenmann. [Translator's note: The names of two other men are omitted.]

    Sixth Ward

    Alois Uher, Gustav Bausenbach, Andreas Enzenbacher. [Translator's note: The name of one other man is omitted.]

    Seventh Ward

    Charles Loeding. [Translator's note: The names of five other men are omitted.]

    3

    Eighth Ward

    Julius Miller, George Martin. [Translator's note: The name of one other man is omitted.]

    Ninth Ward

    [Translator's note: No names of Americans of German descent are listed.]

    Tenth Ward

    J. Hayden, Ino Hoffmann, Joseph Wilde, T. D. Fitch. [Translator's note: The names of six other men are omitted.]

    Eleventh Ward

    Joseph Witte, Henry Gade, Otto Dehling, E. S. Solomon. [Translator's note: The names of five other men are omitted.]

    Twelfth Ward

    John Bartels. [Translator's note: The names of two other men are omitted.]

    4

    Thirteenth Ward

    Conrad Folz, Gustavus Fischer, K. George Schmitt. [Translator' s note: The names of three other men are omitted.]

    Fourteenth Ward

    Adam Grimmel, Fritz Beinhof, William Kleber, P. Steinmueller, John Loeber. [Translator's note: The name of one other man is omitted.]

    Fifteenth Ward

    A. C. Hesing, John Herting, Peter Hand. [Translator's note: The names of five other men are listed.]

    Sixteenth Ward

    A. Baierle, G. Oertel. [Translator's note: The names of five other men are listed.]

    Election of delegates to the Republican County Convention which will meet tomorrow in the room of the Recorder's Court was held in yesterday's primary. Following is the result: First Ward ...

    German
    I F 1, I F 4, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 20, 1869
    Edmund Jussen (Editorial)

    All local Germans will be gratified to hear that Mr. Edmund Jussen has been appointed Federal Revenue Collector for the First District of Illinois; for it would have been difficult to find a more capable and worthy German representative for this important office. Mr. Jussen is a well-educated man and is highly respected by all who know him. A gentleman in the full sense of the word, his political attitude, too, has been weighed and not found wanting. During his long residence in Chicago he acquired all the technical and commercial knowledge necessary to perform the duties of his new office, and his work will be a credit to the friends who sponsored his appointment.

    Originally Mr. Jussen sought a European consulate in the hope of recovering 2his health which had been impaired by his strenuous activity during the War.

    While on the way to Washington, he took sick in New York, and he was in that city when Mr. Jacob Rehm, the only other German aspirant to the office of Revenue Collector, voluntarily withdrew his application. Some close friends of Mr. Jussen then decided to persuade him to apply for the appointment, and so notified him by telegraph. When they received his consent, Mr. Judd took charge of the matter with the zeal which he is wont to display when acting in behalf of his German friends. He and some German Republicans of Chicago succeeded in persuading the President to disregard his (the President's) brother's business partner and appoint Mr. Jussen.

    The fact that Mr. Jussen is related to Carl Schurz caused some of the latter's jealous opponents to accuse him of nepotism. However, we can assure them that Mr. Schurz is not guilty of any underhanded act. Just because he is related to Mr. Jussen, and any intervention on his part in behalf of Mr. Jussen would 3be ascribed to motives other than a desire to promote public interest, he refrained from using his influence in the matter. In fact, he had absolutely nothing to do with the appointment. Mr. Jussen owes his appointment solely to his position among his fellow citizens and political associates in Chicago who succeeded in convincing the President that he could chose no better man for the work. As to the claims of Mr. Schurz' political friends in Missouri--that he should use his influence in their behalf--they may rest assured that none of that influence was exercised for the benefit of Chicago.

    [Translator's note: For a biography of Mr. Jussen see Andrae's History of Chicago.]

    All local Germans will be gratified to hear that Mr. Edmund Jussen has been appointed Federal Revenue Collector for the First District of Illinois; for it would have been difficult ...

    German
    I F 4, I F 1, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 09, 1871
    [The Temperance Problem]

    Yesterday evening a mass meeting against the temperance fanatics took place in the Northside Turn Hall.

    Herr Michaelis opened the meeting and proposed Mr. Max Eberhardt as chairman. Dr. Lebell was nominated as secretary. On a motion of Mr. Michelson the chairman nominated a resolutions' committee consisting of Messrs. Edmund Jussen. Julius Rutisheuser, Albert Michelson and Cherles Haussner.

    Mr. Emil Dietzsch said the time had come when the Germans at last could energetically demand to be left alone and in peace in regard to the temperance issue.

    Mr. Schlager gave a historical survey of the events since the election of the so-called Peoples Ticket in 1869. The majority has not only challenged the Germans by reinstituting an old ordinance, but had added insult by decreeing the total closing of the inns from midnight to midnight.

    Fortunately, the November elections are not far off. We will have to elect twenty aldermen, and if the Germans use their influence wisely we should be able to elect aldermen who will have promised before the election to insist 2Whereas the City Council of Chicago has enacted an ordinance on June 5th, prohibiting the sale of alcoholic beverages on Sundays - be it therefore resolved by the German-American citizens of Chicago -

    1. That the German-American element of Chicago declares all encroachment by the Temperance and Prudery Movements on its social and civic rights as unconstitutional......

    6. That we are firmly resolved not to sacrifice our rights for all the demonstrations of professional politicians who tell us that we might endanger the Republican Party. As long as one party represents genuinely republican principles we fight in its ranks, but when it deteriorates into a tool of the Prudery Movement and prestly power (Muckerthum and Pfaffengewalt) then we regard it as our duty to start the organization of a more liberal party......

    9. That we regard it as the duty of all German-American papers fearlessly and energetically to support the German-American interest against the intolerant Prudery Movement, without regard for the possible consequences for any extant party organization......

    11. That a committee shall be nominated to hand copies of this resolution to

    Yesterday evening a mass meeting against the temperance fanatics took place in the Northside Turn Hall. Herr Michaelis opened the meeting and proposed Mr. Max Eberhardt as chairman. Dr. Lebell ...

    German
    I B 1, I B 2, I F 1, I F 4, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 10, 1871
    Editorial.

    That a large majority of the German citizens of Chicago are against a Sunday holiday enforced by the police because they see in it a violation of their constitutional freedom of conscience is nothing new to anybody. A large majority of the Germans - but by no means all. There is a considerable number of highly respectable German citizens, mostly Methodists and Lutherans, who prefer the stricter American conception. If one estimates this number at 2,000, one is likely to put it rather too low than too high. After subtracting this minority the German conception of Sunday freedom would dispose of about 6,000 German votes.

    How many votes of Irishmen, Bohemians, and Scandinavians could be won is hard to say. As to the native Americans, in a straight vote on the question, at least 95 of 100, no matter if they be Democrats, Republicans, or "Liberals" would certainly vote for the traditional, strict Sunday holiday.

    It is therefore necessary in order to get at the Sunday legislation (primarily municipal) that we count not only with our wishes, but with the facts and with realistic numbers. No matter if a crowd shout ever so loud that an end must be 2made of the despicable prudery, that we Germans "must act on our own hook," that we must "take up the glove," - that will not transform six into twelve, much less seventeen. To found a new party is one thing, but to gain for this new party a majority of the votes in the city is quite another thing. The city has about 35,000 voters. How many of these would join a party the single platform of which would be the abolition of the closing laws? Hardly even 10,000. But even if there were 12,000, and if the other 23,000 votes would distribute themselves equally between Republicans and Democrats, which is auite out of the question - even the we would have at best a plurality of 500, that the first gust of wind would disperse.

    What then is to be done, if one does not feel satisfied in just adopting threatening solutions but really wants to get somewhere? Shall we organize a violent uprising? Kill the police? Storm the city hall? Play Paris Commune? Bah: No person in his right mind thinks of anything like that. There remains therefore, only the lawful way. That is to say we must try to elect a majority of the City Council, and a mayor and police commissioner who sympathize with the German conception. This can be done if the Germans, instead of founding a completely impotent new party, make their weight felt at the time of the nominations inside of the two existing parties. There are hardly half a dozen wards where all German Democrats and Republicans together could 3gain a majority. But there are many wards where they are strong enough in each party to force the nomination of men who will promise not to favor the Sunday law.

    For the rest the German Republicans and the German Democrats can then remain true to their other political convictions. Are both the Republican and the Democratic candidate pledged to the Liberal point of view in this question? Then it will really not matter - as far as the Sunday law is concerned - who of the two gets elected.

    That a large majority of the German citizens of Chicago are against a Sunday holiday enforced by the police because they see in it a violation of their constitutional freedom ...

    German
    I B 2, I F 1, I F 4, I C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 10, 1871
    [Political Matters] Mr. Editor:-

    The undersigned would like to ask you for supplementation of your report on the mass meeting of June 8th. After the motion of Mr. Kielholz had been adopted to send three men from each ward to an anti-Temperance Committee. Mr. Richard Michael is moved to reconsider this resolution, and to replace it by one according to which the Executive Committee should call meetings in each ward, in each of which three citizens should be elected to form together with the members of the Executive Committee an Anti-Temperance body. This motion was adopted. Signed: Max Eberhardt, President A. C. Lebell, Secretary.

    To Our German Fellow Citizens:

    In execution of the order that we received at the mass meeting on June 8th, we are inviting the German citizens of the 16th, 17th, 18th, 19th and 20th ward on Saturday June 10th at 8 P.M. to meet at the place of Mr. Karl Nibbe, Larrabee and Willow Street, respectively that of Mr. Muller, Sedgwick and Sigel, respectively that 2of Mr. Theadore Willems, Larrabee and Elm, respectively that of Mr. Almendinger, Oak and Rush, respectively that of Mr. Rodemeyer, Clark and Indiana Street, in order to elect three Committee members in each ward.

    All friends of personal freedom and independence without regard to party are invited.

    Signed: The Executive Committee.

    The undersigned would like to ask you for supplementation of your report on the mass meeting of June 8th. After the motion of Mr. Kielholz had been adopted to send ...

    German
    I F 1, I B 2, I C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- August 09, 1871
    [Political Matters]

    In the last session of the City Council the conflict between the aldermen and the mayor has taken a turn that is to be deeply regretted. Last Saturday, those members who so long had held up the nomination of commissaries for the Bridewell, agreed to renounce the nomination of an Irishman and to insist on a German. The mayor named some thirty men, among them five or six Germans of unexceptional character. From this list the deputation of the City Council selected three (Sherman, S. S. Hayes, and John Heating) whom they recommended to the mayor. Mr. Mason, thereupon seems to have thought he should not have shown himself too compliant and should not altogether renounce his right of initiative. So he sent in on Monday evening, three names (C. C. Hammond, Mancel Talcott, and Louis Wahl) who should have been perfectly acceptable to the City Council. However, these names too were voted down (by a divided vote of 17 to 17). With the exception of Glade, all German aldermen (Schmitz, Ratterman, Buhler, Schmidt, Schintz, Schaffner, and Busse) voted against the confirmation of the German Louis Wahl.

    The demand that one of the three commissaries should be a citizen of German birth we have thought justified - not as the vulgar and libelous Times intimates - out of national hatred against the Anglo-Americans, but for the very simple reason that many Germans being unable to speak English, the appointment 2of a German speaking commissioner is the only way to deal with various complaints and abuses. However, when the mayor - yielding to this demand - nominates a highly respected German citizen, a gentleman of the most honorable character, of recognized business ability and splendid education, and then his name is voted down - then it is easy to conclude that the reasons for this resistance are such that must fear the light of day.

    The Council can and shall refuse confirmation to unqualified candidates, but it shall not vote down excellently qualified men, because, if Mr. Schintz had been mayor, he would have named different persons. If this is being done, then the only result will be what a certain side aims at: Namely, that enmity is sown between the English and the German speaking Republicans.

    The mayor, without doubt, will send in the three names again tomorrow. Until then, we hope, some of the seven Germans who voted Monday against the German Louis Wahl will have arrived at a better judgement.

    In the last session of the City Council the conflict between the aldermen and the mayor has taken a turn that is to be deeply regretted. Last Saturday, those members ...

    German
    I F 1, I F 4, I C