The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 04, 1871
    [Political Matters]

    The German citizens of the western part of the 16th ward, the so-called Bavarian settlement, yesterday had their first meeting at 775 N. Halsted street, in order to consult and come to an agreement on who would be the best man to represent the common interests of this large and in part still "original" district of Chicago. The hall was filled to its capacity; about 100 prominent, long-time citizens, mostly German, discussed animatedly the selection of candidates.

    Mr. Carl Haussner was elected permanent chairman, and Mr. George Menzel, secretary - both by acclamation. Mr. Snyder gave the main address. He proved that no city district was so neglected by the City Council from beginning on as the Bavarian settlement. This German district counts for nothing in the eyes of the honorable aldermen. The numerous population has to pay more than its share into the city treasury without getting anything in return. Because it is a German district, nobody had thought to connect it with the city sewers or the gas and water pipes. Never since the district was settled has an alderman come from there. They hail without exception from the aristocratic eastern part of the 16th ward; and so it has come about that in the east everything has been fixed up and the value of real estate has been multiplied. 2While the western, German part, in many ways seem only a village, even though the people must pay the high city taxes.

    These conditions have engendered the determination to nominate this time a man from the Bavarian settlement as alderman; in the place of Tyler, Mr. B. Miller was recommended, and accepted the nomination. To report on other suitable candidates for alderman a committee of five was nominated, consisting of Messrs. Peter Regitz, Mathias Mathis, Edward Schmeisser, H. Russer, and J. H. Snyder.

    The German citizens of the western part of the 16th ward, the so-called Bavarian settlement, yesterday had their first meeting at 775 N. Halsted street, in order to consult and ...

    German
    I F 1, I F 3, I F 4, I F 6, V A 1, I C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 23, 1871
    The Municipal Election

    For Mayor: Henry Greenebaum - so writes the Chicago Tribune, and thereby utters a thought of further bearing than it, itself, perhaps realizes. The election in this moment of a German banker as Mayor may be worth millions to the city. It is the surest, most infallible way to inspire German capital with confidence in Chicago and to attract large loans. That the city, in the time of its greatest need calls a German business man to its helm - a man whose energy is as firm as steel, whose probity is as true as gold - will be taken as a pledge the world over, that our horrible calamity has had a purifying influence also on our local politics.

    Henry Greenebaum is in the best sense of the word a self-made man - since his boyhood, with all his planning and doing, rooted in Chicago. He is a Chicagoan with enthusiams. He is one of the best representatives of the indefatigable spirit of enterprise, the persevering energy and the noble unselfishness that have made Chicago great... To be Mayor during the next two years, means to have a better chance to perpetuate one's name in national history, than a Senator or State Governor usually has. And Henry Greenebaum would be the man to take advantage of this chance.

    2

    The proposal of the Tribune, to which all Republican papers (we have reason to believe, will assent) shows at the same time in what way the city can be preserved from being plunged from its present calamity directly into the hodge podge of party politics. Both parties should come to an agreement about an electoral ticket comprising the most capable and most honorable members of both - a ticket that could be elected without quarrel, nor opposition. The Republican Greenebaum as Mayor, the Democrat Gahl as Treasurer...in such a way a list of candidates can be constructed with which every citizen can be satisfied, so that an opposing list does not need to appear at all.

    For Mayor: Henry Greenebaum - so writes the Chicago Tribune, and thereby utters a thought of further bearing than it, itself, perhaps realizes. The election in this moment of a ...

    German
    IV, I F 4, II A 2, I F 1, III A
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 27, 1871
    [Political Matters]

    Today the final conference between the Central Committees of both parties, for the construction of a common list of candidates, will take place. (Footnote: In the Central Committee of the Republican Party at this occasion, Raster, the editor of the Staats Zeitung, seems to have played a considerable role.)

    To our German Republican friends who zealously protest against all concessions to the Democrats we only want to submit the question: Is the Republican Party at this moment still a majority in Chicago? It is so possibly, but it is not certain. The most dependable Republican wards lie in ashes. The Republican voters have been spread in all directions of the compass. How many can and will on election day wander miles and miles in order to vote? Hardly one among ten. And even if they do it, it would still be very questionable if they are legally entitled to vote in the wards in which they no longer live.

    For these reasons, together with those evident from the whole situation of Chicago, the two parties have regarded it as just and proper to conclude 2an armistice. The election of 1871, so to say, shall not count in the party politics of Chicago.

    Today the final conference between the Central Committees of both parties, for the construction of a common list of candidates, will take place. (Footnote: In the Central Committee of the ...

    German
    I F 1, I F 3, I F 5
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 31, 1871
    The Illinois Staats Zeitung Publishes the List of Candidates on Whom Both Parties Have Agreed, and Comments:

    For the mayoralty, Joseph Medill has been proposed. He, not long ago, pressed in the Tribune the candidacy of Mr. Henry Greenebaum in the warmest and most emphatic terms. It has therefore certainly not been animosity against the Germans which gave Medill the nomination, but exclusively the desire to satisfy all classes of society. Medill is a man of honor whose highest ambition is to see his name connected with the reconstruction of Chicago, and just as he in good faith proposed the name of the German Henry Greenebaum, so Greenebaum and all good Germans will stand by him faithfully.

    For the office of police commissioner, Jacob Rehm has been nominated in place of Fr. Gund. Not because any member of the committee doubted the honesty and the good will of Gund, but because Rehm's executive ability, practical experience, and knowledge of men seemed greater than Gund's. Everyone of those who voted against Mr. Gund is in sympathy with him and expects that he, who 2has lost so much in the fire, will find a proper position in the city administration. The same is true of Fritz Metzke who had to be passed by, in spite of the zealous boosting by his German friends, for Rumsey who happens to be better known in American circles.

    Of the other Germans on the list nothing needs to be said. Everybody knows them as men of the highest integrity. J. H. Pahlmann, Christian Wahl, John Herting, and Joseph Roelle have been proposed as county commissioners, and better men than they, it would be hard to find. On the list of city offices stands the name of Georg von Hollen......

    For the mayoralty, Joseph Medill has been proposed. He, not long ago, pressed in the Tribune the candidacy of Mr. Henry Greenebaum in the warmest and most emphatic terms. It ...

    German
    I F 1, I F 5, I C, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- November 06, 1871
    [Political Matters]

    Tomorrow the citizens of Cook County will be able to show if the misfortune that has come over Chicago shall not at least have the one good result that the bums and scoundrels who have remained on the property of the city like leeches are put into discard.

    The ticket that has been presented to the public by the central committees of both parties consists of a series of names which belong to the best and most esteemed of the city. They are the names of men to whom every citizen could intrust his private fortune without anxiety. Men, who unlike C. C. P. Holder (candidate of the opposition) do not use up the charity funds intrusted to them to ride around in buggies, nor would they keep them in their own pockets, nor use them to enrich Irish schnaps-keepers, in order to buy votes through them. They are on the contrary, men whose names alone are sufficient to get for the city the credit which it so urgently needs.

    Shall a fellow whom the whole German public for years has been pointing out as an incendiary - be elected as a representative of German intelligence and honesty? Shall our police and our fire department (the impotence and inefficiency of which four weeks ago has been so glaringly exposed) remain an Irish Democratic organization, worse than the disreputable New York municipal 2police? If this should happen, it would be a terrible blow for the honor, the good name, and the credit of Chicago.

    Tomorrow the citizens of Cook County will be able to show if the misfortune that has come over Chicago shall not at least have the one good result that the ...

    German
    I F 1, I F 4, I F 5, I F 6, I C
  • Skandinaven -- March 18, 1872
    Jens Olsen (Kaasa)

    Nominated as candidate for the office of City Collector, Jens Olsen, needs no recommendation from us. It is far more necessary and important to urge his countrymen to work for his election. We are not now going to decry the regrettable fact that the Scandinanians as a whole take such a halfhearted, passive attitude in the political life of the city. But we do consider it proper at this time to remind them of their political duty as citizens on election day; and also to remind them that if they neglect to cast their vote for him, Jens Olsen's excellent chances for election may be ruined.

    They should not rest assured that the candidate's fine qualities are in themselves sufficient to lead him to victory. The Norwegian Republicans who are so numerous in Chicago ought to make themselves more felt in the city politics. To be content with one representative (H. L. Hertz) in the city convention is almost ridiculous. Such modesty is entirely out of place in politics.

    Nominated as candidate for the office of City Collector, Jens Olsen, needs no recommendation from us. It is far more necessary and important to urge his countrymen to work for ...

    Norwegian
    I F 1, I F 5, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 17, 1872
    [Political Matters]

    From a dependable source we hear that on the "liberal" side the proposition has been made to nominate Gustav Körner for governor. The nomination of Körner would be much too smart a move than we would. believe such fossils as Uncle Jesse K. Dubois, Hatcher, Miner, and "Long" John Wentworth, who have taken the lead in the liberal movement in Illinois would be capable.

    But let us suppose that Körner would be nominated for the governorship - we would be quite satisfied. In him we would gladly support a man about whose attitude toward the Temperance Law we have no doubts. The majority in the legistature has been pleased to disregard party restrictions in respect to temperance legislation, it therefore must not be surprised that we, on our side, in fighting this law will 2recognize no party difference. Besides, Mr. Körner, up to now, has been a firm and faithful Republican and the fact that he is regarded by the "Liberals" as one of them will not make us doubt the honesty of his Republican convictions. Taking into regard his statesmanlike ability, his legal knowledge and thorough acquaintance with all public interests of the state of Illinois - there is no eminent man in the state who surpasses him in these respects.

    Americans could regard it as proof of his Americanism that he is almost 40 years a citizen of the state, that is to say, longer than most of the native Americans living in Illinois. As to the Germans, they will support in him a man who has never been ashamed of his German birth...

    From a dependable source we hear that on the "liberal" side the proposition has been made to nominate Gustav Körner for governor. The nomination of Körner would be much too ...

    German
    I F 1, I F 3, I B 2, I C, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 20, 1872
    Our German Candidate for Governor.

    The day before yesterday we proposed the "liberal" German, Gustav Körner of Belleville for governor and declared ourselves willing to support him. Naturally we expected the most enthusiastic indorsement of the "liberal" Germans. Our proposal opened to them an excellent way out of the predicament into which they were sure to fall through the candidacy of the signer of the Temperance Law, John M. Palmer. Of what quality the German scribblers are, who have been hitched before the cart of the new party, one can see from the fact that they have not even communicated our proposition to their readers...........

    The day before yesterday we proposed the "liberal" German, Gustav Körner of Belleville for governor and declared ourselves willing to support him. Naturally we expected the most enthusiastic indorsement of ...

    German
    I F 1, I B 2, I F 3, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 29, 1872
    [Political Matters]

    At last one of the "liberal" German papers in Illinois has found the courage to strongly endorse our candidate for the next gubernatorial election. It is the Illinois Freie Presse in Springfield.

    Those German "liberals" who are not bound to the temperance-man, Palmer, should follow the example of the old, splendid, Fritz Hecker, who calls Korner in his latest letter to the Illinois Staats Zeitung, the "strongest and best candidate," an "honest, incorruptible man" and an "able jurist and statesman." We only add that, Korner is a dependable opponent of the Temperance Law.

    At last one of the "liberal" German papers in Illinois has found the courage to strongly endorse our candidate for the next gubernatorial election. It is the Illinois Freie Presse ...

    German
    I F 1, I B 2, I F 3, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 11, 1872
    [Political Matters]

    For the profit of those who might be deceived by the supposedly growing popularity of Greeley, be it said, that Greeley is gaining strength only on the anti-German side......The Democratic Irishmen, popularly called, "Russians," hate the Germans with the same ardor as their kinsmen, the French. They gloat over every humiliation of the Germans, and just because Greeley has been nominated to spite the Germans, they loudly acclaim him........

    For the profit of those who might be deceived by the supposedly growing popularity of Greeley, be it said, that Greeley is gaining strength only on the anti-German side......The Democratic ...

    German
    I F 1, I F 3, I C