The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Svornost -- May 10, 1881
    A Proclamation to All Bohemian Owners of Bakery Shops

    Bohemian bakery shop employees, at a meeting held Saturday afternoon, in the Hall of "Tel. Jed. Sokol" (Gymnastic Union Sokol), for the purpose of deciding the best method to secure the betterment of working conditions, accepted the following resolutions unanimously:

    (1) Publicly by means of the newspapers to notify all proprietors of bakery shops to install a twelve hour day and give a wage increase of ten per cent.

    (2) For every hour of work performed after 12 o'clock midnight, the worker is to be paid fifteen cents.

    (3) Those employees who are boarded by the employer, are to enjoy such food and quarters as are befitting a working man.

    (4) All those who work without board and room are to receive three dollars more weekly pay.

    (5) All proprietors of bakery shops are called upon to decide these points before Saturday, May 14 and announce their decisions to the Chairman of the Bohemian Bakers Union under the address of Hynek Kopp, 161 Bunker St.

    Bohemian bakery shop employees, at a meeting held Saturday afternoon, in the Hall of "Tel. Jed. Sokol" (Gymnastic Union Sokol), for the purpose of deciding the best method to secure ...

    Bohemian
    I D 2 a 3, I D 1 b, III A
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- October 24, 1881
    The Socialists Congress

    The congress met yesterday morning at 10 o'clock for its third session, at which Mr. Jim O'Meara was presiding. The protocol of the two previous sessions, as road by Mr. Spies, was accepted by the assembly. Mr. Peterson submitted the following plank and requested that i should be substituted for plank two of the platform: "In order to put an end to the degradation of labor, and in the interest of humanity, to advise the creative unions and other labor organizations, in accord with our principles; and to lend such organizations if they are of a progressive character... our sympathy...and support." The plank was...unanimously accepted.

    In the name of the organization committee, Mr. Herben submitted the following report:-

    The name of this organization should be:"The Socialist Revolutionary Labor Party"...

    2

    The party shall be composed only of organized groups which recognize the revolutionary principles of this congress..

    Every group shall act independently, and shall be given the right to plan and act, in accord with conditions, where propaganda in their interest is to take place, assuming plan It also in accord with the platform and the decisions of the party...

    It is recommended, that each group takes the name of the place of its location...

    To form a group five persons are considered to be sufficient.

    The appointment of an information commitee for Chicago, which ought to consist of a secretary from each of the foreign language groups...

    Groups which wish to join this party would necessarily have to be indorsed by an already existing group in their vicinity.

    3

    Ten such groups shall be justified in calling a national convention... the cost of which shall be covered by voluntary donations...

    Applicarts for membership, have to give a written pledge, that they are in full accord with the principles of the party, and will condemn any compremise whatsoever...

    Following this, the organization committee... discussed each article separately. Mr. Peterson proposed that the party choose the name of "International Labor Association". Mr. Schwab declared himself in favor, but Mr. Winnen delivered a lengthy speech against it...

    Mr. Spies declared himself in favor of the name. The party has carried up to the present and emphasized, that the radical socialists brought only honor to it and that it would be of no advantage to make the proposed change...

    4

    Mr. Swain proposed acceptance of the name: "International Labor Association and Social Revolutionaries."

    Finally, after lengthy debate, the party was named "Revolutionary Socialist Party..."

    Article 2 has been accepted without any changes, also, articles 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9 as well as the following decisions: In the name of the combatants for liberty to express our good wishes to Russia's Socialists... Resolved: That we herewith indorse the transaction of the congress of the National Labor Association, which was held in London, July 14-20, 1881, and in accordance with the Congress at London,...we, in the United States, considering this country's conditions have organized...

    It has been further resolved, that this congress acknowledges organizations. the me bars of which carry arms, and are ready to defend their right in case of attack, and also recommend the formation of such organizations throughout the United States.

    5

    It has been decided, that our members shall under no circumstances be permitted to vote for a person or party, who is not absolutely in accord with our platform, and shall reject any compromise of whatever nature...

    It was finally decided that the "liberty" of Boston, the Vorbote of Chicago, and the Nye Fid also of Chicago, are to be considered in futuare as the organs of the party.

    The congress met yesterday morning at 10 o'clock for its third session, at which Mr. Jim O'Meara was presiding. The protocol of the two previous sessions, as road by Mr. ...

    German
    I F 3, I D 2 a 3, IV, II B 2 d 1, I C, I E
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- March 27, 1882
    The Union Council Meeting.

    The Union Council meeting was held yesterday noon at 193 Washington Street. It was its semi-monthly session with about 25 delegates present. President Rodgers acted as chairman.

    Delegate Cain could not see why Chicago's workingman should not have the same privilege of getting some property at the lake front to build a large Union Hall, as our militia Regiments possess, for the purpose of shotting down discontented wage slaves. Delegate Murphy reported that in the name of the organization-committee, he has called a meeting for all Brewery employees, but, was not able to build up an organization, because none could master the English language and there was no German-speaking delegates who could have made himself comprehensible to both sides. At the conclusion of this, two Germans were assigned to the organizing committee and thereupon a second meeting of the Brewers was called. The delegates Bonnefot and Schmalbach were added to the committee.

    The Union Council meeting was held yesterday noon at 193 Washington Street. It was its semi-monthly session with about 25 delegates present. President Rodgers acted as chairman. Delegate Cain could ...

    German
    I D 2 a 3, III A, I C
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- May 05, 1882
    Tanners- Attention

    The German section of the Tanner's Union has 1821 members already. Regular meetings are held every Saturday evening at 533 Milwaukee Avenue. The initiation fee is $1.00 until June 1st, after that date it will be raised to $5.00.

    We soon expect to initiate about 1000 more, to join our organization.

    The German section of the Tanner's Union has 1821 members already. Regular meetings are held every Saturday evening at 533 Milwaukee Avenue. The initiation fee is $1.00 until June 1st, ...

    German
    I D 2 a 3
  • Skandinaven -- November 17, 1882
    Knights of Labor

    Again the "Knights of Labor" come into the limelight. Much speculation and discussion regarding this organization are going on among the people.

    Now definite information is at hand about this more or less mysterious group. The Knights of Labor was organized in Philadelphia in 1873. At that time it was a secret organization, and for several years remained unknown to the public. Only after four years of its existence did it come out in the open in the guise of a "Brotherhood."

    It seems that the cloth and linen weavers in Philadelphia were the first to conceive the plan of the organization. The stronger the organization became numerically, the stronger it became organizationally, and the more progressive it became.

    In the seventies labor struggled against low wages and long hours, and 2unemployment. So it was natural that the Knights of Labor should grow and become strong. The membership is now about eighty thousand although in 1878 it was twelve thousand. This shows a remarkable increase in four years.

    The "Knights" are nonpartisan; at one time they indorse the Democrats and at another the Republicans. However they only indorse the best candidates, and always the friends of Labor.

    Lately they have resolved to try to have their own people nominated and elected. If they are successful, we can see that it will strengthen the position of the workers and cause a decided change for the better, both in wages and hours. [The principle demand of their program will be of course more jobs.]

    Again the "Knights of Labor" come into the limelight. Much speculation and discussion regarding this organization are going on among the people. Now definite information is at hand about this ...

    Norwegian
    I D 2 a 3, I D 2 c
  • Skandinaven -- November 18, 1882
    Knights of Labor

    The Knights of Labor restrict their membership to workers and small bosses only. According to their constitution, anyone who manufactures or sells liquor, lawyers, doctors and bankers are ineligible. The small bosses are permitted to number only one quarter of the total membership.

    The Knights of Labor claim to support the move to set up government employment offices for workers and also co-operative institutions. They oppose prison work, and child labor. They demand equal pay for men and women, and a maximum of eight hours work per day. They also want the workers to receive weekly pay; they oppose bi-monthly and monthly pay days.

    They believe that all public lands should be sold only to the people and 2not to the railroads or large industrialists, and only enough land per family which can be properly cultivated--a maximum of one hundred and sixty acres.

    It is without doubt the strongest workers' movement in the history of the United States. If its growth continues, it will be a real force, not only politically but socially.

    As we go to press, they have decided to throw their forces with the National Greenback-workers Party, which will to a certain extent strengthen their ranks. We can see the strategy of this move since it gives a definite political face to the organization.

    The Knights of Labor restrict their membership to workers and small bosses only. According to their constitution, anyone who manufactures or sells liquor, lawyers, doctors and bankers are ineligible. The ...

    Norwegian
    I D 2 a 3, I D 2 b, I D 2 c
  • Skandinaven -- November 28, 1882
    The Knights of Labor

    The Knights of Labor are today two hundred and fifty thousand strong.

    It would be fine if this group of workers would found their own political party. We need new parties--new blood.

    The Knights of Labor are today two hundred and fifty thousand strong. It would be fine if this group of workers would found their own political party. We need new ...

    Norwegian
    I D 2 a 3
  • Skandinaven -- May 31, 1884
    Demonstrations

    Labor and political demonstrations are becoming quite a fad today. Some of the demonstrations held here lately have been instrumental in winning a great number of issues for labor.

    The Knights of Labor have been the leaders in most of the major demonstrations. They have come to the front especially for the building trades, the bakers, and the cable and horse car unions.

    The recent strike at the Pullman Palace Car Company was successfully led and won by the Knights of Labor. Many of the so-called "assemblies" are officered by prominent Scandinavians.

    Tonight, at 8 P.M., a mass meeting will be held in Battery "D" Armory. A call has been sent out to all labor and fraternal organizations to attend this meeting. Many prominent speakers will be present, and the burning 2issues of interest to labor will be on the agenda.

    We believe that these militant demonstrations and mass meetings will win many issues, and at the same time pave the way for a broad, unified labor movement.

    The Scandinavian Typographical Union has been very active recently, and some very radical resolutions have been presented by the Danish members of the union.

    Labor and political demonstrations are becoming quite a fad today. Some of the demonstrations held here lately have been instrumental in winning a great number of issues for labor. The ...

    Norwegian
    I D 2 a 3, I F 2, I F 3
  • Die Fackel -- June 22, 1884
    [Southside Socialists Meet]

    The Group Soutside held its regular agitation meeting yesterday evening. Comrade Fischer lectured on the theme: "The Unions and the International Workingmen's Association." Speaker laid stress during his lecture upon the fact that the I.A.A. does not oppose the unions as such, but that it fights against the reactionary tendencies, which seem to be prevailing in them. He refuted the union's principle: A good day's wages for a good day's work, and spoke against the silliness of harmony between capital and labor.

    The unions should desert the legal basis of the capitalistic way of production and follow a more radical principle, that of communism. He contrasted the confused principles of the Union with those of the Communists and pointed out, that only in the free communistic society could humanity live a happy life. The speaker was loudly applauded. The lecture was followed by a short but lively debate.

    The Group Soutside held its regular agitation meeting yesterday evening. Comrade Fischer lectured on the theme: "The Unions and the International Workingmen's Association." Speaker laid stress during his lecture upon ...

    German
    II B 2 g, I D 2 a 3, I E, IV
  • Skandinaven -- February 05, 1887
    The Knights of Labor [Forge Ahead]

    The Knights of Labor warned Mayor Harrison that if he did not pass [sic] ordinances in favor of labor he would be defeated in the next election.

    The Knights are becoming more and more militant. They seem to grow stronger and stronger. They have now more than five thousand assemblies throughout the country, and are organizing additional assemblies right along. There is no doubt but they will be a factor in the next national election, especially if they indorse the new National Labor party.

    The Knights of Labor warned Mayor Harrison that if he did not pass [sic] ordinances in favor of labor he would be defeated in the next election. The Knights are ...

    Norwegian
    I D 2 a 3, I F 2, I F 3