The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 08, 1871
    Editorial:"The Dictators of the Erie Railroad."

    "Vanderbilt, Gould and Fisk are typical of the American finance and railroad world. They do openly what the directors of other companies do under cover and which is the fleecing of share-holders, and of the public with the help of the legislature and the Courts of New York. From time to time the great public is permitted to take a look behind the curtain, as a year and a half ago, in "The Chapters on Erie" by Charles Francis Adams, Jr., and since then, through the various attempts made by the unfortunate shareholders to rid themselves of the dictators.

    One connection is that of Gould and Fisk, with Tweed and Sweeney and these dictators of the New York City, and State democracy, makes it all but impossible to attack and to shake the dictatorship over the Erie. The further development of the fight will determine the judgment of the world about the Courts and the Legislature of New York.

    "Vanderbilt, Gould and Fisk are typical of the American finance and railroad world. They do openly what the directors of other companies do under cover and which is the fleecing ...

    German
    I D 1 a, I F 6, II E 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- July 31, 1871
    [Political Matters]

    The meeting of the Workers' Association for Social Politics which was held yesterday at 113 Milwaukee Avenue was very well attended. Mr. Zimpel took the chair. Mr. C. Klings gave the main address. He pointed to an article in the Illinois Staats Zeitung which had all too clearly shown the mistakes of the worker's movements heretofore. The workers must take care not to let themselves be hoaxed again by the professional politicians.

    In 1869 the People's Party accepted the workers' program but not a single one of the People's candidates who were elected kept his promises. Now they had asked Karl Schurz to come, so that his nimbus may throw a glory around the reform humbug. Schurz, however, had shown himself in his true light last year in St. Louis, so that any thinking worker could easily see through him. He would adopt any political persuasion that his interest dictated...Where is there any difference between politicians? Democrats, Republicans, and the reformer Schurz all worked for the land theft from the people by the Northern Pacific Railroad. If the workers were not able to name their own candidates, at least they should not permit themselves to be used by the spoilsmen and office hounds.

    The meeting of the Workers' Association for Social Politics which was held yesterday at 113 Milwaukee Avenue was very well attended. Mr. Zimpel took the chair. Mr. C. Klings gave ...

    German
    I F 6, I D 1 a
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- August 05, 1871
    [American Railroad Shares]

    As is well known, German, Austrian, and Dutch capitalists have actively participated in placing American railroad shares in the European money market. The leading bankers of the three countries have named a committee of experts to travel on the roads and to convince themselves of their condition at firsthand. This committee arrived here last night and stays at the Tremont House. It consists of Mr. August Folsch, Vienna; Counselor Hass, Berlin; Mr. N. J. Dentex, Amsterdam; and the special correspondent of the Frankfurter Zeitung, Otto von Breitschwerdt.

    During their short stay in Chicago - they will return in about two months - the gentlemen could not marvel enough at the colossal commercial life which they found here.

    As is well known, German, Austrian, and Dutch capitalists have actively participated in placing American railroad shares in the European money market. The leading bankers of the three countries have ...

    German
    III H, I D 1 a, I C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- August 12, 1871
    [The New German Savings Bank]

    A year ago the German Savings Bank was born, and so vigorous has it proved to be that it has grown like no other savings bank either here or elsewhere. It has left its New York namesakes - that is to say - in their first stages of development far behind it, both in number of depositors and in the sum-total of deposits.

    The deposits amounted to:

    $141,005 on November 1, 1870
    274,231 " February 1, 1871
    346,702 " May 1, 1871
    504,537 " August 1, 1871

    that is to say, to more than half a million, and what is no less important, they were contributed by 2,780 depositors. The German Savings Bank in New York had after nine months of its existence only 1,900 depositors, and $232,000 deposited.

    Such a success proves that the enterprise is built on names that inspire unusual confidence, and also proves the extraordinary business experience of Mr. Henry Greenebaum, who has been able to win as shareholders and 2directors men who know how to gain recognition for the new bank in the widest circles.

    A year ago the German Savings Bank was born, and so vigorous has it proved to be that it has grown like no other savings bank either here or elsewhere. ...

    German
    II A 2, I D 1 a, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 18, 1871
    [The Great Fire]

    Like vultures and harpies the speculators are swooping down on the field of ruins of the German part of Chicago. Alderman McCauley has moved, on the day before yesterday, to sell out the Northside to the railroads. All German citizens of the North Side who want it to become again what it has been should protest as vigorously as possible against this plan.

    Now that Chicago is half burnt down and its extension towards Hyde Park is prevented for long years to come, the North Side with its magnificent Lincoln Park at last should be able to catch up with the unnaturally inflated South Side. But if, as McCauley in the pay of the railroads demands, the North Side is furrowed with railroad tracks and is made into a smoky, ill-smelling freight yard - then good night, old North Chicago with your pleasant German life! Then you are condemned to become a dirty district of proletarians!

    Whether Chicago shall become a Yankee nest, in which Brother Moody rules and where the "Dutch" form a contemptible subordinate class, or if it shall be resuscitated as the most cosmopolitan city of America, that is now up for decision.

    Like vultures and harpies the speculators are swooping down on the field of ruins of the German part of Chicago. Alderman McCauley has moved, on the day before yesterday, to ...

    German
    I F 3, I D 1 a, III A, I C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 29, 1872
    ["The Better Classes"]

    An ugly and very un-American phrase has for some time recurred frequently in the Anglo-American papers, the phrase the "better classes."

    What such papers as the Tribune, Times and Evening Journal understand by the "better classes", or the "respectable tax payers" is nothing else but largely the native capitalists ("Geldmenschen"O who have become rich less through productive labor than through "Schacher", and frequently through the most odoriferous speculations... In a court in London a witness once was asked what he meant by the term "gentleman." His answer was:" a man who maintains a carriage and horses." That about corresponds to the sense in which our English papers speak of the "better classes." Only that here something more than coach and horses is needed for respectability. One also needs for it a beautiful house in the Southern part of Michigan or Wabash Avenue, in Calumet, Prairie or Kankakee Avenue; and one needs for it fine clothes, diamonds, and an expensive seat in a fashionable church. He who has all that is a highly respectable "gentleman" even if he has made his money by renting houses for brothels. Because in this respect our" high-minded" Republicans hold it with the Emperor Vespasian who cold-bloodedly said about money tainted with blood and sweat: "Non olet"-Money carries no smell...

    2

    When a small clique of money bags who are just making ready to hoodwink the government and to sell to it a plot for $600,000.00 for which they earlier tried in vain to get $450,000.00- when such a clique decides to forbid to thousands of poor plot-owners to build such houses as they could pay- that is to say to steal from them half of what they have- then papers like the Tribune, and Times assure us that the "better classes" i. e. the people, are agreed, and that all those who object are wretches, brawlers, bums, demagogues and the rabble who must be put down by force of arms or through the law courts. As, in order to equal fully their European prototypes they seek help from the clergy to browbeat the "rabble" that dares to resist the "better classes."

    The use of the word "better classes", in the sense in which it is being used by our American newspapers, is a far more serious insult against the American Republic than the display in a procession of a black-red-golden or a black-red-white (sic!) flag can possibly be. Because this flag indicates only a community of race or language- that nefarious word on the other hand announces the existence of Junkerish appetites of a type much more repulsive than those of the Prussian Junkers because they spring not from an imagined superiority of birth, but from basest money pride.

    An ugly and very un-American phrase has for some time recurred frequently in the Anglo-American papers, the phrase the "better classes." What such papers as the Tribune, Times and Evening ...

    German
    I D 1 a, III A
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 02, 1872
    [Mass Meeting to Protest Actions of Railroad]

    Last night a mass meeting took place in the very large hall of Mr. Friedrich Koch, 584 S. Halsted Street. It was attended by Germans, Irishman, Bohemians and other inhabitants of that part of the 8th Ward which is threatened by the land robbers of the La Salle and Chicago Railroad Company. Alderman Bailey presided, and Alderman Clowrey, together with Messrs. Walsh, Fraser, Gelis and John Reiser (who, living 26 years in Chicago, was called on to make a speech, but excused himself), drew up a set of resolutions for the City Council.

    Mr. Carl Gelis, 596 S. Canal Street, made a speech, in German. He said, he had lived 22 years in the district and owned two large plots at the corner of Stewart Avenue and Meagher Street, and at Stewart Avenue and Wright Street. This district, he said, was largely populated by "foreigners" probably more densely than any other part of the city, and as dear to those who live there as their marble palaces to those who live on Michigan Ave.

    2

    When Henry Greenebaum was alderman of the ward he voted for the grant of the right-of-way on one side of Stewart Avenue to the Chicago, Fort Wayne, and Pittsburgh Line, on condition that the company would keep the other side of the avenue in good repair. This, however, has not been done. Now the other side is to be given to another company. If the companies want the the streets, they should buy the plots. The speculators and monopolists are well able to pay for everything at its full value.

    Last night a mass meeting took place in the very large hall of Mr. Friedrich Koch, 584 S. Halsted Street. It was attended by Germans, Irishman, Bohemians and other inhabitants ...

    German
    I D 1 a, III A, I C, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 10, 1872
    [Railroad Monopoly]

    The following weighty article was written by Friedrich Hecker in the sick room to which he unfortunately is still confined, and where he now studies the question of the Railroad Monopolies:

    Production, exchange, trade and traffic are already the slaves of this monopoly. Due to the millions with which these modern "Princes Taxis" can buy advocates, legislatures, and newspapers the subjugation proceeds quietly with a giant's steps. Soon they will command national politics, too, and it is time that the press unceasingly raises the hue and cry, so as to move public opinion to take hold of the matter in all seriousness.

    The question of these monopolies is much more important than all the endless gossip about the good and the bad qualities of this or that candidate for an office.

    2

    The question is all the more difficult as the taking over the railroads by the United States would open the doors to centralization and bureaucratic power. Yet it is undeniable that such a centralization in the hands of powerful combinations already exists, and that men like Sickles, Vanderbilt, Carpenter and others, hold a royal and more than royal power..

    To emphasize only one point and to show the public how it is being cheated: The highest freight rates are charged for the short distances. That is to say, the transport to the nearest market is most weighted down by the monopolists. The producer gets less for his products and the consumer, in the big cities, pays excessive, yes, real starvation prices. The difference between the product and the consumption fills the pockets of the railroad prices.

    The following weighty article was written by Friedrich Hecker in the sick room to which he unfortunately is still confined, and where he now studies the question of the Railroad ...

    German
    I D 1 a, I F 6
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- August 14, 1872
    Protection and Schurz

    No thinking laborer or business man can listen to one of the long speeches of Senator Schurz, without noting how carefully the speaker avoids all reference to protection of home industries and the practical issues of taxes and custom fees. While the Chicago Tribune has preached for years that reform consisting in the abrogation of customs duties should be effected, so the excessive high labor wages may be lowered, Mr. Schurz has nothing to say concerning this important question. And he well knows that these questions are of great importance to the majority of Germans. Nine-tenths of the German population of America are diligent laborers or small storekeepers. Among them are thousands of whom a protective tariff is of vital importance. Should the tariff on iron be lowered, as the apostles of free trade advocate, the big rolling mills in Chicago that provide a livelihood for thousands of families, would have to close their doors, because they could not compete with the cheap capital and labor of the mills in England.

    2

    These questions are of greater importance to the German public than they are to English-American, because the German laborers, are much greater. While Mr. Schurz knows this, he does not talk about it because he can not say anything in conformity to the wishes of his German listeners. Now which is more important to the laborer, Schurz as Secretary of State, or protection to home industries?

    No thinking laborer or business man can listen to one of the long speeches of Senator Schurz, without noting how carefully the speaker avoids all reference to protection of home ...

    German
    I D 1 a, I D 1 b
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- August 19, 1874
    The Congressional Election in the Third District To the Editor of the Illinois Staats Zeitung

    There is a rumor about that I intend to withdraw my candidacy for congress in the 3rd district. Two newspapers have made a remark to that effect. I wish to contradict such an assertion and to state that I shall present myself as candidate before the opposition convention. But should there by any one better fitted to unite all the people against the party of corruption and monopoly, I shall gladly withdraw and support any one who can bring us victory. May I add here that I only expect honest votes and that I do not intend to get any support through the influence of money.

    Respectfully yours,

    Washington Hesing.

    There is a rumor about that I intend to withdraw my candidacy for congress in the 3rd district. Two newspapers have made a remark to that effect. I wish to ...

    German
    IV, I D 1 a, I F 6, I E