The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

Filter by Date

  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 28, 1887
    Not One German Among Them

    During the last 8 months, we German-Americans had to hear repeatedly, that hardly without exception the sentenced Anarchists were all Germans. To be correct, only 5 of the sentenced men were born in Germany, 2 are natives of America and 1 is an English subject. But of what nationality were the feminine admirers of the sentenced anarchists, to whose trials they have run day after day? To what nationality did these women belong, who before and after the sentence was passed, visited the condemned men all too often, turning their heads with flattery? Among these women never a German was seen, unless it was a close relative of the accused men and then her behavior was always dignified. These women who found pleasure in visiting the jail and its occupants, are members of the so-called better class of English-Americans. Spies of course was the involuntary center of their interest. The fact that 6 of the condemned men are married was a little barrier, and they were left alone by the half crazy women folk.

    Lingg, the youthful dynamite bomb manufacturer is a single man and in addition 2a much handsomer man than Spies. He is also considered a much more interesting man, for he resisted his arrest most vigorously. But Lingg's expression is sulky, his manners reserved and he showed himself not at all in favor of feminine visitors. As a matter of fact, it is not at all necessary for a sentenced man to be handsome, in order to become a darling of "ladies" of that caliber. This shows the case of murderer Mulkowsky clearly. That he did not become engaged to marry one of the fair sex was probably due to the fact, that his lawyer was not a match-maker. Not one woman present at court preceedings or a visitor to the jail, was German, for the German women still believe in decency. In German families the daughter does not rule her parents; the father is not the "old man" or the mother the "old woman" relinguishing the rule of the house in favor of the daughter. They have and continue to be the bosses in their own home. This is of course, the result of sane rearing of German girls, who don't allow themselves to become sickly sentimental or oppose custom and decency.

    During the last 8 months, we German-Americans had to hear repeatedly, that hardly without exception the sentenced Anarchists were all Germans. To be correct, only 5 of the sentenced men ...

    German
    I E, I B 3 b, I C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 29, 1887
    The Public Schools.

    The Turn community opened its winter season, last night, at the north side Turner Hall. As the program promised to be one of interest to teachers, the audience was composed largely of teachers. Turner Max Stern acting as chairman introduced Charles Bary as first speaker. Mr. Bary is well known for the excellent services he has rendered us on the normal school question, and the retention of its director, Mr. Parker. Mr. Bary, American born, chose for his subject "Our public schools" using splendid German. After a short historic sketch about the development of the American public educational system, and a humorous remark about the now abolished system of memorizing, he devoted his speech to comparisons between the public school system of America and that of Germany. Of course the comparison showed that the German system is much more effective and Mr. Bary closed his address with the recommendation to cultivate the German educational system. This was followed by a play, "A scene in a Berlin police court" played by four members of the dramatic school. The next number on the program consisted of a debate concerning the question: "Would education be benefited by exclusive employment of male teachers in public schools?". 2The chairman's invitation for a general participation in the debate did not find any response, therefore, Mr. Bary was approached again with the request to give his opinion on this subject. He paid tribute to women's kind and beneficial influence upon the heart and soul of the child, therefore, prefers a female teacher for the elementary school and male teachers for the more advanced pupils, and he also endorsed Frobel's educational system.

    Turner Neinrich Suder contended, that the disrespect shown to our women teachers is the result of the home atmosphere of the pupil, and caused an outburst of applause when he praised the well mannered boy who, when meeting him would salute him properly and simultaneously remove his hat; but what disrespect was shown by a boy just saying "Hallo Suder". It was a very animated evening.

    The Turn community opened its winter season, last night, at the north side Turner Hall. As the program promised to be one of interest to teachers, the audience was composed ...

    German
    I A 1 a, II B 2 g, I B 3 b, II B 3
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- April 28, 1888
    Suffrage

    Raster writes that it is not necessary to take the menacing nagging of some fanatic women seriously. Does he mean his article does not have to be taken seriously? His main reason is that women do not want the right to vote.

    It is hard for us to say that a nominal amount of women do not want suffrage but we will even concede that most of them do not care about their rights to vote, This is because of our having given them a wrong education and of having surrounded them for centuries with prejudices which dulled them to their own interests.

    The attainment of suffrage is in the interest of woman as the development of the political and economic conditions interest and touch her often far deeper than the man. Notice the rise of prices and fall of wages because of the tariff.

    Besides the interest any woman has in a reasonable molding of political and economic conditions she possesses an incontestable right for co-operation on legislation. She fulfills the same allegiance to the government as does the man and equal duties should have equal rights.

    Do not take exception to the fact that women are not subject to military service 2since in several countries, men are also not subjected. Besides for a woman it is as great a sacrifice to send her husband, sweetheart, son, or brother to war while she remains at home in constant fear for the life of her loved one.

    Not only has the woman the right to participate in public matters but she also has a pressing interest in it. And if this right has not been acknowledged by the legislature of most countries then it is for the reason that so far men have made laws in their own interest and to the disadvantage of women.

    There would have never been such important laws about divorce and subsistence for children born out of wedlock or about adultery on the part of women in contrast to men, if women had participated in legislation.

    The reason that women as yet do not have much interest in public affairs, prefering gossip and newspapers to economic and political questions, lies in the fact that they had no right to participate in these questions. If they possessed the right they would soon learn how to make use of it to the fullest extent. But it is disgraceful and humiliating that women should declare it not proper to show any interest in politics, that this is against feminism, that men will look after those matters, etc.

    We feel sorry for a slave who does not feel his chains, but more pitiable is one 3who boasts about his chains. And to this number of unfortunate ones belong a large number of our women.

    Raster writes that it is not necessary to take the menacing nagging of some fanatic women seriously. Does he mean his article does not have to be taken seriously? His ...

    German
    I K, I B 3 b, I B 3 c, I G, I H, I E
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 14, 1888
    A Practical Application.

    About two weeks ago the so called General Beem died. Since his death he has obtained more publicity than during his whole life. Out of his career of shame and disgrace many practical applications can be made; but whoever thought of making such a special one as did the local newspaper, Globe? This paper has taken over the bitter hatred of Germanism from the old Times and publishes the following: "This man Beem who assumed the title of "General" without having any claim to it whatever, this member of the best social clubs, this pretended learned man, and ambitious, politician, is now being exposed as a man not only without morals, but also without brains. One exception, however, must be admitted. Although he was insane, there was method in his insanity. He was a German. Of course, it can not be said that all Germans are crazy, but psychiatrists are of the opinion that there is a considerable tnedency towards lunacy in the German blood (hear ye). This opinion is confirmed by the large numbers of Socialists, Communists, Anarchists with which the German states are flooding the world."

    2

    The Globe should have gone a little farther and paraphrased the well known citation from Horace Greeley: "Not all Democrats are thieves, but all thieves are Democrats" into: "Not all Germans are crazy, but all crazy people are Germans".

    It is not worth while to get indignant and angry about an explosion of hatred against Germans so vile that it is nothing short of insanity.

    It is, indeed, true that Beem was a son of German parents, although he tried very hard to cover it up, and he understood not one word of German, or, at least, he did not want to understand it.

    To make a practical application of this matter it should be said: A son of German parents, who intentionally denies his German descent and pretends to be of American origin, is in danger of exchanging all the good qualities of his German nature for all the worthless contemptible traits of the Americans.

    Woe unto those German parents who favor their children's degermanization in their stupid illusion that the English language, which they themselves understand very 3deficiently, is the superior one. In too many cases children learn only the scum of the conversational language and of the English papers they prefer those publishing scandals and indecent stories.

    Therefore it is a crime which German parents commit against their children and this country, if they deliberately try to up root those excellent inborn German traits in order to make of them worthless mock Americans who are ashamed of their German origin.

    Children, raised by German parents, with genuine German discipline and honor, make the best American citizens, who highly esteem the German language as a dowry from their parental home. Those children of German descent, who despise their being of such parentage, usually turn out to be worthless, as was the case with Beem.

    About two weeks ago the so called General Beem died. Since his death he has obtained more publicity than during his whole life. Out of his career of shame and ...

    German
    III A, I B 3 b, II E 2, I C
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- September 26, 1888
    Woman's Vocation. By Johanna Greie.

    In the hands of the woman rests, for the bigger part, the task of raising the future generation, and of making this generation understand true human virtues.

    Then why is it that we women are kept eternally in a condition of bondage, when in our hands rest the good and evil of future generations? Why should the only class that produces mankind, be stripped of its human rights?

    These are questions that come up involuntarily when one realizes how numerous are the enemies of a reasonable emancipation of women.

    The progressive class-conscious workers especially should realize the necessity of giving more consideration than has been done so far to womankind as educators and formers of the future generation.

    How can a mother be in a position to teach her children reasonable understanding 2of our world and life when her own mind is crammed with antiquated screwy ideas and prejudices.

    If a woman wants to give her children a good education aimed at a practical life, she must be in a position where she herself is able to judge happenings and events in practical life, and she must be acquainted and well versed with those. She can and will only then be able to teach her children rational thinking and acting, after she has learned them first herself.

    Mothers must be given entirely different positions in society if the education of children is to be a real solid one in conformity with actual conditions. There must not be any rules of exception for women, or the degeneracy of coming generations will infallibly be the result.

    It is indeed unspeakably sad to have to admit that our children must combat always anew the errors and mistakes produced by the same faulty education as we had in youth, in order to reach a clear, rational view and that this fight is going on under much more disgusting and pressing conditions now.

    Is it not far more our holiest duty to help and try to make this battle easier 3for our children? Should we not direct our undivided attention to the early acquisition of consciousness of genuine human dignity on the part of our children, to which acquisition every single human being as a part of the universe has the same right.

    If we want to reach this goal we have first to bring to life this consciousness. The interest of all women must be aroused for present day questions and demands of imminent importance to all workers.

    This understanding will come just as it did with men.

    The mother, being acknowledged to have the greatest influence in most cases on the mental development of her children, will then be in a position to form her children into real human beings who will become loyal, spirited followers of the suppressed and enslaved proletariat.

    Is not this aim worth while - to throw away old ideas of rights and laws, opinions and habits?

    Is it not high time to help women in their efforts to become emancipated, by advice and deeds, instead of working against them, and to use head and hand for 4energetic co-operation in order to realize the demands of a rational emancipation of women which is in harmony with the principles of justice and humanity!

    Just cast a glance at present day married life. I will not go into details with regard to the married life of the upper ten thousand, as I presume that the way those marriages are contracted and the growing demoralization in marital fashions are well known to everybody.

    The same stands for marriages within the so-called bourgoise or middle class.

    There is no concern whether the future bride is physically well or whether her character guarantees a happy married life in the future. No, the first question is: Is there money in her family, and how much?

    You will hardly find more than three or four marriages in a hundred that are found to be at least a bit bearable. There cannot be any talk of happiness, as found in a union based on free mutual harmony and love in which the two individuals supplement each other.

    And married life within the working class? Seldom, very seldom do we meet 5a couple of human beings who are of equal mentality and feeling.

    Defective education and the steady grinding fight for existence, for daily bread, hinder the formation of a harmonious, really happy life.

    When the earnings of the husband are not sufficient to procure the barest necessities and wife and children must go to work for support of the family - then what is life of such a married life?

    It is now easily understandable that as a consequence of these pressing worries for existence disharmony and dissatisfaction appear.

    And how does all this affect the minds of the children who a re witnesses of unpleasant scenes, resulting from this disharmony?

    Or let's assume that the earnings of the husband are sufficient to enable him to live a halfway decent and care-free life. The wife, then, is in a position to give herself fully to the education of the children and to make a comfortable home for her husband.

    6

    But he is also interested in liberal progressive ideas. He goes occasionally to meetings and tries to discuss afterwards with his wife what he heard and saw. But she shows no understanding, no interest in such serious questions and perhaps even differs with her husband and agrees with the opinions of reactionary tendencies, as, by the way, most females do.

    The husband stands firm in his conviction, the wife the same in hers; one word leads to another and the matrimonial disrupture is accomplished.

    The wife begins to hate the causes, the meetings, organizations, etc., out of which come these ideas and discussions which in her opinion estrange her husband from children and herself.

    What a different picture is presented to our eyes when husband and wife are mutually interested and have understanding between themselves.

    A little patience and indulgence on the part of the man, and graciousness and reasonable discernment on the part of the woman, and it cannot be otherwise than that the woman will grow to respect, honor and love her husband's convictions.

    7

    She will become interested in the ideas of our present time and will understand them, and will perhaps become a fearless fighter for truth and right.

    The man, on the other hand, will now be able to have discussions with his wife of a more serious nature, which will gain in interest as the mutual exchange of ideas and opinions furnishes the necessary stimulus.

    He will feel more comfortable in his home from then on, the spare time left him after the day's work will become a time of real recreation because he knows that his wife is of the same feeling and thinking as he.

    The wife must be the best friend, the most loyal comrade to her husband.

    Then this marriage will show a mental harmony which is necessary for happiness.

    The wife will, furthermore, in correct judgement of the situation, raise her children to be energetic brave men.

    No sneaks, flatterers and egoists, excelling in servility, slavery and bigotry, will grow up, but an absolutely true, proud and brave generation will bloom 8forthwith!

    Mothers, take interest in all those serious questions concerning the good and evil of mankind. Learn to realize that you have to make use of your energies in the interest of humanity.

    Do not be afraid of obstacles and interceptions in your way but fight your way bravely through trash of silly prejudices of past days.

    Demand your human rights and fight for them. Your slogan shall be:

    "It is for the future of our children," and you, men, do not remain any longer in inactivity and stubbornness in regard to woman's emancipation, but try to have your wives and daughters spend a few hours for the advancement of a just and rational woman's emancipation.

    You should be proud when your wife learns to think instead of remaining thoughtless all her life and unacquainted with high idealistic aims of humanity.

    It is not the purpose to set women against men but to but to bring them to the point of a realization that is necessary for the whole nation.

    9

    Don't let us forget that all we are doing should be done in the interest of suppressed and suffering mankind.

    Therefore we demand liberation of our women from those unworthy chains with which custom and laws have bound them.

    Let us help to raise women to what they were predestined: "The educator and true mother of her children, the loyal companion and respected comrade of her husband."

    In the hands of the woman rests, for the bigger part, the task of raising the future generation, and of making this generation understand true human virtues. Then why is ...

    German
    I K, I H, I E, I B 3 b, I B 3 c
  • Skandinaven -- September 06, 1889
    [A Love Affair]

    The two love birds, the Chinaman Frank Lee and Miss Jenny Ericksen, who is Swedish, are not married yet. Mr. Ericksen stopped the marriage, because Jenny is not yet seventeen. Mr. Ericksen caused both Mr. Lee and Miss Ericksen to be arrested. The judge agreed that Jenny was too young to decide in the matter of her marriage.

    The two love birds, the Chinaman Frank Lee and Miss Jenny Ericksen, who is Swedish, are not married yet. Mr. Ericksen stopped the marriage, because Jenny is not yet seventeen. ...

    Swedish
    I B 3 a, I B 3 b
  • Svornost -- January 08, 1890
    [Children Should Be Sent to School]

    The State of Illinois has experienced considerable difficulty in forcing the foreign-born in sending their children to school. When asked why they did not send their children to school, they would reply that they had no money or clothes to send the children to school with. When that was furnished they still did not send them.

    Finally Mrs. Axford, a woman with a twelve year old boy, whom she refused to send to school after repeated orders, was made an example of. She was brought before the judge, fined $20.00 and forced to send the boy to school. This example made the other recalcitrant parents take notice and as a consequence the school was crowded on the following day.

    The law is that all children must attend school form the ages of 7 to 14. Heretofore, small children were sent to factories and lot of them had no schooling at all, leaving them illiterate. The English language is taught in all schools, whether they be secular or public and all children should be given an opportunity to acquire an education.

    The State of Illinois has experienced considerable difficulty in forcing the foreign-born in sending their children to school. When asked why they did not send their children to school, they ...

    Bohemian
    I A 1 a, I B 3 b
  • Abendpost -- October 01, 1890
    Emily Rossi

    The suicide of the noted German-American actress, Emily Rossi, together with her sweetheart, Gustav Koch, is not as yet cleared up. The actress had a falling out with her mother sometime ago concerning a love affair in Germany with Felix X. His last name never could be discovered.

    Pressed by her new fiancee, Gustav Koch, to marry him, she admitted she is not able to forget her former lover, and would rather die before marrying him with the love for some one else in her heart. Both became apparently despondent over this dispute and finally decided to die together.

    The authoress Emily Rossi in Berlin, who is the mother of the dead actress, always cherished the wish, according to information on hand, that her daughter should marry a wealthy man.

    The suicide of the noted German-American actress, Emily Rossi, together with her sweetheart, Gustav Koch, is not as yet cleared up. The actress had a falling out with her mother ...

    German
    I B 3 b, I B 3 a
  • Abendpost -- November 09, 1890
    School Instruction and Home-Lessons.

    Our teachers, particularly the teachers of primary schools, are inclined to believe, that a child is the property of the School. This is an error. We have of course a law, which compels the child to go to School. As a rule, all parents are glad and willing to send the child to school for its own benefit and future. But the child belongs first and last to the family, which has the right to dispose of all free time, left for the child after leaving the school-house for home. No child should learn and study without the actual assistance of the teacher. Therefore, during the school hours the child should be completely under the guiding authority of the teacher. Home work should be avoided, as they will always interfere with the recreation and time of the child and the Home-Authority of the parents.

    Our teachers, particularly the teachers of primary schools, are inclined to believe, that a child is the property of the School. This is an error. We have of course a ...

    German
    I A 1 a, I B 3 b
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 21, 1891
    The School Question Polish Parochial Schools (Editorial)

    The English language, along with Polish, French, Bohemian, and Italian, is taught in parochial schools equally, if not even more carefully than other languages.

    That the forgoing statement is true, can be proved by the fact that the graduates of the parochial schools are gladly accepted by the higher institutions of learning, public and private, if their parents desire to give them a better education. No boy, who has finished a Polish parochial school, has ever been rejected by any college on account of poor knowledge of English. Many boys who once attended St. Stanislaus' Polish parochial school in Chicago, are attending colleges and other institutions of higher learning, including the Jesuits college. All of them are making very good progress, and it appears that they have 2a good elementary education, equal to the training received in the public schools. Some of the boys are employed by the telegraph companies, banks, and other institutions, where a good knowledge of the English language is necessary. Still others are studying in Europe, where they would not be accepted, if their elementary education were poor.

    After examining the school books used by the Polish parochial schools, and studying the educational system, European like, practiced by them, any impartial person must admit that the standard of the parochial schools is much higher than that of the public schools, and that the instructions in the language of the country are excellent. There might be exceptions in some small parishes, but not in Chicago. If necessary, we can supply the names of the Polish boys who attend colleges and European institutions, and also names of those who hold good positions in Chicago and vicinity. We have a gew of these names on hand. They are graduates of St. Stanislaus' Parish elementary 3school. This is a sufficient proof that the standard of the Polish parochial schools is not lower in teaching children the English language than that of the public schools. In other respects, however, the standard is higher.

    Is it necessary to prove the foregoing statements? We do not think so. Even the opposers of parochial schools must admit that these schools teach true morality, that they are developing moral principles, the purpose of which is to bring up children as righteous men and women, good citizens, and good patriots of Poland, and of our adopted country, the United States. Who will not admit that their aim is to stir up, and propagate the patriotic spirit in and among children. Is this done by the public schools? This proves that the Poles care more for the welfare of their children. For this reason, they should avoid public institutions and send their children to Polish parochial schools.

    The Catechism

    4

    Children in Polish parochial schools are studying the catechism, but it is not the only subject taught there, as stated by the malicious enemies of parochial schools. Only one hour a day is devoted to this important subject by every class. Catechism teaches children that they should respect their parents more than anybody else in the world, and that they should support them in their old age. Catechism does not teach them how to be clever in evading justice and earthly punishment, but it teaches them how to live in order to receive and eternal reward. The catechism does not teach them how to be clever with their fellowmen, but how to be honest. The catechism also teaches them to respect the laws of the country, otherwise, how to be good American citizens. For this reason alone, children are taught catechism in parochial schools, and since the Bible is not used in the public schools, the parents should not send their children to the public schools, but to the parochial schools.

    No one should say that the mother will not teach her children the prayers, or that the teachings of the priests are not necessary, and that it is 5useless to learn the whole catechism from memory, because it will be forgotten later on. It is true that some of the teachings learned from the catechism are forgotten, but not the foundation upon which the whole life is built, just as a foundation of a building which cannot be seen, yet it upholds the whole structure. The same principle also applies to spiritual foundation. It will uphold the whole life, even if it is hidden, providing it is well-grounded.

    Patriotism

    Love for the mother country, a desire to belong to one's nationality, is developed only at the parochial school, and this desire is destroyed by the public schools, and by the association with other children on the streets. The parents, alone, cannot build a foundation. The Irish know that, and for this reason, they do not sent their children to the public schools, notwithstanding the fact that the language of the Irish is English. This is also known by the Germans, who have their language in the public 6schools, yet they have their own institution. Not only German Catholics, but also German protestants defend parochial schools, and as long as they remain good Catholics, or good protestants, they do not send their children to the public schools. Only those who are unpatriotic, and indifferent to religion, send their children to the public schools.

    Some Bohemians, who have lost their faith, their nationality, their refinement, and are afflicted with anarchism, or masonry, which was spread in this country by the Germans, do not wish to learn patriotism. Only such Bohemians are trying to establish the Bohemian language into the public schools; by this action they try to persuade other Bohemians to send their children to the public schools. Other Bohemians are misled by the first group. Should Poles imitate Bohemians?

    The English language, along with Polish, French, Bohemian, and Italian, is taught in parochial schools equally, if not even more carefully than other languages. That the forgoing statement is true, ...

    Polish
    I A 2 a, I A 2 b, I B 3 b, I B 4, I C