The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

Filter by Date

  • Abendpost -- October 11, 1907
    Lutheran Commercial High School

    The Lutherans of Chicago intend to erect a large Commercial High School and expect to collect for this purpose $50,000 within a short time. Under the leadership of the Concordia League, $12,000 has already been raised. The course at the Commercial High School will follow immediately the course of the Elementary School. Just at this age a large number of Lutheran children become estranged from their church and to keep them in steady touch with their church is the main purpose of the institution that will, besides the subjects of a Commercial High School, also take up Religion in its course of instruction. The new school shall be opened in the business district and shall be large enough to give admittance to several hundred young people of both sexes.

    The Concordia League which fosters the plan consists of representatives of every Lutheran parish in Chicago. It has nominated a Committee to devise plans for the enterprise and it received offers for financial aid from many 2other churches. The plan is unique as most of the institutions that are supported by religious societies prepare their pupils only for intellectual professions. Later on it is expected that a manual labor institution will be added.

    As soon as the necessary $50,000 are signed up, a meeting of representatives of the Lutheran clergy and laymen will be called to execute the plan of the chief sponsors of which are Alderman Albert W. Beilfuss, Julius H. Geweke, and Robert Schoenfeld.

    The Lutherans of Chicago intend to erect a large Commercial High School and expect to collect for this purpose $50,000 within a short time. Under the leadership of the Concordia ...

    German
    I A 2 a, I A 2 c
  • Greek Star -- December 20, 1907
    Why Our Dances Are a Failure (Editorial)

    Three great balls were given last week in this city by the local chapter of the Panhellenic Order, the Saint George Tanias Society, and the Phoenix Club. No one, of course, has any doubt about the good intentions of these organizations in giving these magnificent dances for the entertainment of our people. But upon considering the financial results of these affairs, we observe that the Greeks of Chicago spent the huge sum of $1,500 this year without receiving any real enjoyment or profit. On the contrary, the committees could not meet the expenses, which were far in excess of the receipts.

    In discussing these annual social affairs we notice that this year's ball given by the Panhellenic Order was a miserable failure compared with the 2brilliant affairs given in other years. Even the dance of the Phoenix Club proved to be a failure from both the financial and the social standpoint. The only organization which succeeded in offering the Greeks of Chicago a real treat was the Saint George Tanias Society, which made a net profit of $350.

    In attempting to discover the reason for these failures of the Panhellenic and Phoenix societies, we find that in the case of the former methods of organization and the arrangements were so poor, and the committees appointed so inefficient and sluggish, that failure was inevitable. It seems that the Panhellenic Order has lost its vitality and force, although there is no reason to believe that it cannot regain its old glory and prestige. On the other hand, the Phoenix Club is to be blamed for having spoiled one of its best opportunities to make a favorable impression on those who are contemplating membership in a great nationalistic society. It was obvious that the dance committee overruled itself somewhat. This organization 3has made the people tired of the many socials which have been given over a short period of time.

    The success of the Tanias affair was due to the fact that the people have not been called upon to contribute and support its socials more than once a year. Moreover, the board of the society has worked systematically and wholeheartedly in the sale of tickets,in the selection of a suitable and first-class hotel ballroom or hall, and in the proper reception and entertainment of friends and guests.

    It is very unfortunate that these balls, judged as a whole, should have failed, since their success would have directly benefited our Greek schools.There is no excuse whatever for the failure of these attempts to support our churches and our charitable and educational institutions. The financial and executive committees of any organization that expects to receive the 4full and unreserved support of the Greek community must seek at the very outset the support of the press, the consulate, and the priests.

    No organization, regardless of its power or influence, should undertake to solicit funds for any community or national cause without asking the full co-operation of the other major organizations, the consulate, and our church authorities. Let us hope that no other society or club of any kind will attempt to act independently when an appeal is made for a cause that concerns the entire Greek community of Chicago.

    One can well imagine how much our nationalistic, our communal, and our patriotic interests can be harmed when we think and do things out of purely selfish motives.

    Three great balls were given last week in this city by the local chapter of the Panhellenic Order, the Saint George Tanias Society, and the Phoenix Club. No one, of ...

    Greek
    III B 2, I A 2 c
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- November 28, 1908
    Proclamation of Our Bishop to Polish Organizations and All Polish Socieries in America

    Fellow countrymen:

    We were driven out mainly by heavy pressure and misery from the old country; we threw away our empty desperation. We did not work in the bottomless sea of foreign influence without our knowledge, but with faith in God tied to our tongues. Virtue and Polish habits are always drawing us closer to national unity.

    From the midst of our modest and poor living, we shot into heaven our verification of the old faith in God and his many saints. Near them the young hearts in our parochial schools are rejoicing at our good intentions.

    But nevertheless we all feel that we need a higher culture and higher 2branches of teaching so we can overcome our lack of culture and ease our suffering.

    In the city of Chicago where the population of Polish people surpasses the population in the city of Lwow in Poland or the city of Crskow, it is proof to us that we must have more and higher branches of teaching to save our language and the history of our native land, as well as our existence in America.

    The Polish colleges were founded in 1892 by the O. O. Resurrectionists and in several years expanded to the great number of the present day; praised are the patriots who helped bring recognition to our Polish schools and teachings.

    In the old building near Division Street there is no school lecture hall, not even a reliable hall for drilling our children; there are not sufficient rooms to accommodate our constantly increasing number of teachers.

    3

    Because of the fire regulations, the school and the teachers rooms cannot be overcrowded, which proves to us that we Poles should make it our duty to have a new modern up-to-date school built to accommodate all our Polish youngsters.

    But alas: another more important matter knocks at the hearts of our caretakers; above all, the heart of our well known leader, Most Rev. Father John Kosinski. Therefore we Poles with our nationality, three million strong in the United States, must, for the sake of our schooling, expend our Polish colleges in Chicago.

    This institution has received the approval from our central government to establish this college and to be recognized on a par with our American colleges. It should, in time, come to be the first Polish college in the United States.

    What praise it will be for our Polish people! What great advantage will it bring to our youngsters and the Polish families?

    4

    The higher Polish gymnasiums and Polish universities in Catholic Christianity support culture and science and in a short time will elevate the standing of the Polish nationality and open now fields for our talented Polish graduates.

    Fellow countrymen! This kind of work will place us high in the eyes of other nationalities and will shatter the arguments of our enemies who are trying to make an example of us and classify us as lower than any other nationality, but this is not so and we Poles should fight and demand our rights in this free country.

    Fellow citizens! Let us add our efforts and not hold back our donations so that the splendid plan of Rev. Father John Kosinski can come to reality in the shortest possible time.

    The foundation (for our Polish college in Chicago today represents a first-class high school) surpasses the European gymnasiums.

    5

    There are quite a number of educational collections gathered by the Order of Resurrectignist Fathers. There are educational faculties and above all youth is desirous to learn.

    Fellow countrymen, it is in your power, upon your willingness and sacrifices depends, the success of moving the Polish college to a new building, scientifically improved and developed, to be a fortress and guardian against outside influences, who are denationalizing our youth, depriving them of their basic belief in God and in the future of our dear Fatherland.

    Let us all lend a hand in the deed, which the Rev. Rector John Kosinski at present desire to bring into reality; lot us give our youth a higher education and ability to prepare a better future for the nation.

    Let it be that from faith and education will come a rebirth of our nation, and we will be able to celebrate in the near future our resurrection!

    6

    Having this conviction, the citizens committee organized for this aim under the leadership of the Very Rev. Bishop Paul Rhode, calls upon all fellow countrymen, without exception, to give even a small bit for this purpose, so noble and patriotic.

    May it be that in the publicly announced lists of donors there be found the humble offerings of the poorest. Let every Polish man and Polish woman lend a hand in this act.Let our old Fatherland and our foes see our unity and solidarity, let all of us receive more faith and belief in the future, when everybody, without exception, will put in their offerings for a place and the erection of institutional edifices which will be a testimonial of love for our country, language and Polish education to our future generations.

    Heartily and ardently we beseech you, fellow countrymen, with all your ability to support the Rev. Rector John Kosinski, whom we have invited as treasurer of the Committee.

    7

    All communications should be addressed to the Very Rev. Rector John Kosinski, C. R., St. Stanislaus College, 140 W. Division St., Chicago, Ill. Committee:

    Bishop Paul Rhode, Honorary President; John F. Smulski, Treasurer, State of Illinois, President; Rev. Father P. M. Wojtalewicz, President of the Administration of the P.R.C.U.; Rev. Father Jacek Gulski, Chaplain of the Polish Women's Society in America: Rev. Father D. M. Majer, Chaplain of the Polish Union in America; Rev. Father Stanley Nawrocki, President of the Polish Priests Society; Leon Szopinski, President of the Polish Roman-Catholic Union: W. J. Jozwiakowski, President of Polish Alma Mater Society; Dr. Frank E. Fronczak, from Buffalo, N. Y.; and A. Karabasz, from Pittsburg, Pa.

    Fellow countrymen: We were driven out mainly by heavy pressure and misery from the old country; we threw away our empty desperation. We did not work in the bottomless sea ...

    Polish
    I A 2 a, I A 2 c, III A, III C, IV
  • Onze Toekomst -- March 19, 1909
    A Sign of Life

    The girls society of the First Christian Reformed Congregation, on 14th Street, decided on their last meeting to appropriate $200.00 for the support of two Indian Children at Rehobot, their names being Clarisa Pearson and Edward Breen, whom they decided to care for permanently.

    They also will donate $10.00 to the Home Missions, $10.00 To Median Missions, $50.00 to the Christian School and to spend $25.00 for the purchase of new books for the society. This society was fortunate this year to receive $259.60 from their sponsors, while the advertisements in the program of the recently held entertainment brought in the sum of $85.00.

    The girls society of the First Christian Reformed Congregation, on 14th Street, decided on their last meeting to appropriate $200.00 for the support of two Indian Children at Rehobot, their ...

    Dutch
    III C, I A 2 c, II D 10, III E
  • Onze Toekomst -- April 30, 1909
    Comparison

    Mr. Editor: Will you please allow us some space in your widely read newspaper? When we are asked how the public schools are going, we answer, "Excellently." Not only are the taxpayers eager to pay their share, but the parents also are eager supporters, and make a special and individual contribution.

    In Roseland, for instance, there is a school, a public school, where they want certain things done. The city however considers such expenditures unnecessary, so a way has been devised to raise the necessary money. The children will perform a "drill." The majority of the school children, as well as parents and others who are interested, must pay admission to see the show. A great deal of money has already been collected. The sponsors of the public school system certainly support the principle of public education,regardless of how inadequate that education may be.

    We also have our parochial schools, consecrated to Jesus Christ, who died for suffering humanity, and yet it is difficult to collect money for our schools, 2for our parochial schools. Our churches are full to overflowing on Sundays. When I think of the meager financial support given to the parochial schools, I am forced to ask: "Christians, what evidence do you give of your Christian beliefs? Do you imagine that simply by going to church, you are giving evidence of your beliefs? Do you not know that the seed of Christian life is a war against the [secular] world, which is a world of sin? In the public schools they are teaching the children to dance, and other such immoral practices. Using our parochial schools as weapons, we must war against the evil that is being disseminated among the children in the public schools. Therefore we say, Prove your faith and show your principles by your deeds. Prove that you believe that you are only the servants of the Lord. Prove that from the earthly possessions, of which the Lord has made you the administrators you will give as much as you can for the Lord, and that includes your support of parochial education. Therefore to arms, men, women, and children, who have allied together under the banner of the Cross, and prove that your interest in parochial education is as fervent as is that of the secular world toward public school education."

    A friend of Christian education

    Mr. Editor: Will you please allow us some space in your widely read newspaper? When we are asked how the public schools are going, we answer, "Excellently." Not only are ...

    Dutch
    I A 2 c, I A 1 c, III C
  • Onze Toekomst -- September 23, 1910
    Correspondence from Roseland

    Last Wednesday the pupils of the Christian School, 111th and State Streets, spent a pleasant day in the "Pan Handle Woods." The children were transported from the School to the picnic grounds in the woods in automobiles and carriages.

    The Women's Club, which has undertaken the task of making and selling clothes to support the School financially, sold all the clothing which it offered for sale.

    It is reported that the picnic netted the School a profit of approximately one hundred dollars.

    Last Wednesday the pupils of the Christian School, 111th and State Streets, spent a pleasant day in the "Pan Handle Woods." The children were transported from the School to the ...

    Dutch
    I A 2 c, III B 2
  • Onze Toekomst -- November 18, 1910
    The Spending of Money for Different Purposes

    The Women's Benefit Society of the First Christian Reformed Congregation of Englewood has spent this year one hundred and eighty dollars for charitable purposes, namely: Twenty-five dollars for the Medical Missions amongst the Indians; twenty-five dollars for the Home Missions; twenty-five dollars for the Sanitarium for Tuberculosis at Denver, Colorado; twenty-five dollars for the Jewish Missions; twenty-five dollars for the Christian School, and fifty-five dollars for the improvement and lighting of their church building.

    The Women's Benefit Society of the First Christian Reformed Congregation of Englewood has spent this year one hundred and eighty dollars for charitable purposes, namely: Twenty-five dollars for the Medical ...

    Dutch
    II D 10, I A 2 c, III C
  • Denní Hlasatel -- May 27, 1912
    The Grand Lodge of the Cesko-Slovanska Jednota Celebrates its Twentieth Anniversary

    The twentieth anniversary of the Cesko-Slovanska Jednota (Bohemian-Slavonic Society), one of our best societies, was celebrated in a truly dignified manner by its members. The program for the festive occasion was rich in talent. It began with the playing of an overture by Mr. Anton Konopasek's orchestra, following which Mr. Eugene Frydl, president of the National Grand Lodge, delivered the principal address of the evening. In a brief but pithy speech, the speaker referred to the origin of the society, to the work thus far accomplished, and to the many tireless workers to whom belongs chiefly the credit for the growth and success of the society. He gave thanks for the indefatigable work of these members, and expressed the wish that others also, expecially the younger members of the society, would work for its success.

    2

    The Cesko-Slovanska Jednota is one of those Bohemian fraternal benevolent societies which owes its present independent existence to a non-Bohemian society. It was the first to originate the idea of transferring Bohemian members from non-Bohemian societies to itself, and it still does that. It is the society which indicated to other Bohemian lodges, which were dissatisfied in English societies, how they should act to become independent Bohemian lodges. In the time of crisis in the "Independent Order of Foresters", the same methods were used, and for that reason we have an entirely Bohemian society, the Jednota Cesko-Americkych Lesniku A Lesnic (Bohemian-American Foresters). Then, when the medical examiner of the North American Union expressed himself in an unfavorable manner about Bohemians claiming that they lived under unhealthy conditions, the Bohemian lodges of that English organization resolved that they could be independent, and joined the recently organized Cesko-Americka Jednota (Bohemian-American Union).

    During the Eighties, the English speaking society "Knights and Ladies of 3Honor" began an astonishing agitation among the Bohemian people. Although Bohemian lodges existed already at that time, and though they were successful, still as a result of the large rewards offered for the gaining of each new member many new Bohemian lodges were organized. The same methods were employed among other nationalities, with the result that the society could be seen to grow, so to speak. However, toward the end of the year 1890, disaster overtook it. The society's treasurer embezzled about $70,000 of the society's funds, which caused excitement among the members and the expression of unfavorable opinions about the management of the society. When, in the spring of 1891, three assessments were levied in one month, the dissatisfaction of the members reached its height, because such an occurrence was unusual. The representatives of Bohemian and non-Bohemian lodges asked the Grand Lodge officials for an explanation, but instead of an explanation they were told to pay up as soon as possible, and failure to do so would result in suspension. This ultimatum caused so much anger that many lodges 4withdrew from the "Knights and Ladies of Honor" and organized a new society which carried the name "Independent Knights and Ladies of Honor". It was predicted that previous experiences would serve in guarding against all such mistakes as led to the division of the old society, and that the new organization would progress successfully. However this confidence was shattered when a certain widow, a countrywoman, was paid $550 insurance instead of $1,000, and this after long discussions.

    At that time good advice would have been welcome. To return to the old society was an impossibility, and the confidence which the members of the Bohemian lodges had in the new society was destroyed. Therefore, the delegates of the Bohemian lodges were called together, conferences were held, ways and means were sought by which it would be possible to emerge from the unpleasant situation. Finally it was decided that the Bohemian 5lodges should create an independent society. The plan received ardent support, and on May 2, 1892, the Secretary of State of Illinois issued a permit for the organization of a society bearing the name of Jednota Cesko-Slovanskych Rytiru a Dam (Bohemian-Slavonic Knights and Ladies). The Bohemian society adopted this name as its own.

    The enthusiasm with which the new society began its activities contributed to the fact that the progress of the society was satisfactory; everything went forward, and the expectations of the founders were the rosiest. However, these satisfactory conditions did not last long. In the course of a year, several deaths were reported which raised doubt, and this doubt was increased during the economic crisis of 1893-1896. That period is entered in the history of the Cesko-Slovanska Jednota as the most critical. The successes gained by Bohemian tenacity, superhuman effort and unexampled sacrifice on the part of officials were great, and deserve general 6recognition.

    With the improvement of economic conditions came improvement within the society; confidence returned and membership increased. During the years 1899 and 1900 several lodges from the former society were admitted to membership, and in the course of recent years this has been repeated many times; the society has become a refuge for Bohemian lodges whose existence was made difficult and finally impossible within English-speaking societies.

    This same condition applied not only to lodges in Chicago but to lodges outside of Chicago as well. In the society's convention held in Chicago in 1896, the last link to the English parent society was removed by changing the name to Cesko-Slovanska Jednota. From that date the progress of the society is evident. It now has just short of six thousand members, and has $33,000 in its reserve fund. The interest earnings of this fund are used 7to pay the death benefit dues of those members who are unable to pay because of old age. The activity of this society in national and educational matters is great.

    We can boldly assert that the activities of the Free Thought School Association were made possible by a regular monthly contribution which the Grand Lodge turned over to that organization. At the present time there is a new Bohemian central body of representatives of Bohemian societies coming into existence. This group will have as its purpose to take notice of such laws as would be detrimental to the Bohemian societies, and to work against their passage in legislatures where its influence can be exerted. It will be a body which will be useful in national undertakings, and which will prepare the ground for the distant but possible unification of all Bohemian societies having a common goal. The idea of founding such an organization originated in the Grand Lodge of the Cesko-Slovanska Jednota, where they are 8working not only for their own benefit but also for the benefit of all fraternal lodges.

    The twentieth anniversary of the Cesko-Slovanska Jednota (Bohemian-Slavonic Society), one of our best societies, was celebrated in a truly dignified manner by its members. The program for the festive occasion ...

    Bohemian
    II D 1, I A 2 c, I F 2
  • Onze Toekomst -- January 31, 1913
    Correspondence from Roseland

    Some members of the Women's Society of the First Reformed Church, 107th St., Roseland, are working for the interest of the Christian School at 104th St.

    They have been busily engaged with that work for ten months, and the other day they surprised the board of that school with a gift of $36.25.

    We are hoping that this good example will be imitated by other women, either by joining the society, or by forming their own club.

    Some members of the Women's Society of the First Reformed Church, 107th St., Roseland, are working for the interest of the Christian School at 104th St. They have been busily ...

    Dutch
    I A 2 c, III C
  • Onze Toekomst -- February 07, 1913
    First Reformed Church of Englewood

    From the annual report of the First Reformed Congregation of Englewood, we take the following:

    The congregation received from collections for the church, $1,795.98; for the pastor's salary, $1,227.67; for the missions, $204.14; for benevolent purposes, - such as the fund for incapable pastors, church building, etc., - $64.81; and for education, - such as the classical board of charity, seminary salary fund, Christian school, etc., - $174.99; a total of $3,467.59.

    The principal liabilities are: Salary, $1,100; services, $111; sexton's work, $260; repairs on buildings, $681.08; the poor, $406.28; heat and light, $504.25.

    The Board of Trustees report the following receipts: Received from subscriptions 2(for the new church), $12,316.16; monthly receipts, $1,086.91; mortgage, $10,000; other loans, $5,050; interest, $57.55; - a total of $28,510.82.

    The Sunday School has received during the year the sum of $685.43; the Y.P.S.C.E., $276.21; the Dorcas society, $319.21; the Women Mission society, $68.36; Young Men's Association, $53.08; Men's Association, $15.75; Young Women's Mission society, $68; and the choral society, $102.17.

    The Sunday School donated $476.75 to the missions,and the Y.P.S.C.E. gave $65.

    From the annual report of the First Reformed Congregation of Englewood, we take the following: The congregation received from collections for the church, $1,795.98; for the pastor's salary, $1,227.67; for ...

    Dutch
    III C, I A 2 c