The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- September 13, 1893
    The Polish National Alliance Convention (Editorial)

    In Monday's issue of Dziennik [Chicagoski], we gave the last in a series of reports on the proceedings of the Polish National Alliance Convention. We tried to give an accurate account of the Convention's proceedings and, in accordance with our promise, reserved all commentary until. after its close. In this article, we fulfill that promise.

    We see now that we did well to refrain from jumping at conclusions after the first few sessions. In its earlier sessions, the Convention promised to be much worse than what it turned out to be later. Partisan politics played so important a role in its first hours, radical slogans were so boldly spoken, that it seemed doubtful whether the delegates would maintain themselves on the only foundation proper for a Polish institution, 2or whether they would be strong enough to release themselves from partisan blindness to truth and justice.

    Fortunately, it developed differently, at least in a certain measure; at some points, justice and tolerance triumphed. The party which was undoubtedly the stronger, and which managed to re-elect some of the officers who--in the opinion of the minority--bring disgrace to the Alliance, knew how to discard personal prejudices on matters of general importance and followed the voice of justice for the public good.

    We do not say that this was true in all cases. We are well acquainted with other matters which were settled less justly, like the Stan case, for instance; but on the whole, in spite of everything, the Convention turned out to the Alliance's profit.

    What is most important is the fact that it smashed the hopes of anarchists and apostates, who, led on by the evil tendencies of the last editorial 3department of Zgoda, sought to sink their roots into the Alliance, like some malignant parasite. In this respect, the Convention's decisions leave no room for doubt. The attempt by a group of radical delegates to discredit the Third of May Constitution, which has hitherto been the cornerstone of the Alliance, was easily forestalled. The Convention, starting as it did with a prayer in a Catholic church, confirmed the Catholic foundation of the Alliance. Its basic Catholicism was further confirmed by exclusion from the organization of those enemies of the Catholic Church, the followers of Kolasinski, the Detroit apostate. In these two instances, the enemies of the Church were so definitely defeated that they dared not introduce on the floor their famous "memorial," dealing with the school question and proposing a socialistic labor alliance, a "memorial" which the editor of Zgoda saw fit to publish in full in one of the Convention issues of that paper. Thus, the fundamental principles upon which the Alliance exists were maintained; attempts by the radical element to change them were frustrated.

    4

    In performing a public duty, the Convention followed the example of the Polish Roman Catholic Union. It appropriated a sum of money for the Polish Day fund and for the Lwow Exposition [1894]. In addition, it appropriated three hundred dollars for a school in Holy Trinity parish.

    The Convention made several important changes within its own organization. The first, and perhaps the most important of them, was the abolition of representation by proxy. In the past, it often happened that small groups Located a long distance from the city where a Convention was held, could not afford to send delegates of their own. Instead, they sent their blank credentials to various individuals, usually to the Central Administration, in order to be represented by proxy. The Central Administration then distributed the credentials among its own followers. The groups did this in good faith, believing that in strengthening the Central Administration they were acting for the good of the Alliance. In reality, however, they helped create a majority favorable to the Administration, and thus prevented 5criticism of its actions, even when such criticism was necessary. This is what happened at previous conventions. Even at this particular Convention, it was well known to everyone that the names written on a certain number of blank credentials were in the handwriting of one of the officers in the Central Administration. The Tenth Convention's ruling will make such manipulations impossible in the future. Delegates from each group must be members of that group--otherwise the group cannot be represented. This was a very necessary measure, as it will prevent the creation of a "political machine" within the Alliance and will insure equal rights to all members of the organization.

    An important change was made in the Central Administration itself. Henceforth, the Central Administration will consist of the president, vice-presidents, the auditing committee, and the treasurer. The secretary-general, as a paid official, is no longer a member of the Central Administration, whose officers receive no salary. Instead of being an arbitrary dictator, he becomes, as is perfectly right, a servant of the organization 6which pays him. Such a change has long been necessary; in its time, it would have prevented such things as the Morgenstern case and many of the more recent scandalous occurrences. At the same time, this change, putting the secretary in his proper place, releases the editor of Zgoda from his influence. The change, then, should have a definitely beneficial effect upon the affairs of the Alliance in the future.

    We omit discussion of other changes, such as the increase in the death benefit to six hundred and three hundred dollars, and the abolition of the one-cent death assessment, for these are strictly internal matters.

    We hurry on, instead, to give credit to the Convention and the Alliance for the result of the elections to the newly reorganized administration. However, we regard the elections as beneficial only in part. Credit is certainly due [to this Convention] for the removal of Mr. Gryglaszewski as a potential candidate for the office of censor. The turbulent past of this gentleman, his open anti-religious stand at the Convention, and his intrigues directed 7against Censor Przybyszewski during the past year, created the fear that, should Mr. Gryglaszewski stand at the head of the Alliance, he would certainly lead it into a sorry mess. The candidacy of Mr. Gryglaszewski, whose protestations of patriotism frequently smack of humbug, was very skillfully set aside. Mr. Helinski, formerly vice-censor, was elected to the office of censor. His conservatism during the recent misunderstandings was well appreciated. Mr. Lewandowski, well known in Cleveland for his honesty and moderation, and who demonstrated his tact and ability as president of the Convention, was elected vice-censor.

    Another important fact was the removal of Mr. Nicki from the editorship of Zgoda. During the four-year incumbency of Mr. Nicki, the official organ of the Polish National Alliance dropped to an extremely low level, both morally and journalistically. During the past few years it has been an organ of dissension, incapable of conceiving or appreciating a single good idea, a single honest cause. While we deplore the fate of Mr. Nicki, who has been left at a rather advanced age without means of support, we cannot but commend 8the removal of this man from a job for which he was unfit. His successor, F. Jablonski, is a young, capable man, well known, it seems, for his peaceableness and tolerance. He seems destined to make Zgoda a decent paper again.

    Most unfortunate was the re-election of the secretary-general and the president of the Central Administration. Considering the auditing committee's report, the interference of Mr. Mallek with the credentials committee, the charter mix-up, the case against Morgenstern's guarantors, and the illegal expulsion of Stan, the Convention proved beyond a doubt that these two men exert an evil influence over the Alliance's affairs. Their re-election strikes us and many other people as very inept. It will not have a definitely evil influence over the Alliance's affairs however, for a group of new people, representing fresh, healthy strength, have been elected to the Central Administration. These people, working in harmony with the decent elements of the Administration, will not allow any harm to come to their institution. By their own example they may even inspire--and we really believe this--the above-mentioned 9officials to peaceful and constructive work.

    Such were the commendable acts of the Convention, which had its unworthy side also--the case of T. Stan, for example. Against all rules and logic, in spite of the fact that his credentials as a delegate were recognized, Stan was suspended without any formal accusations being made, and his case was put off until the very close of the Convention. Another bad feature was the constant shouting, especially on private matters, which was heard continuously during the entire course of the Convention; often the delegates would direct bitter words against others who did not share their ideas. It is also to be regarded as unworthy that as many as thirty delegates (against a majority of seventy) voted for acceptance of Kolasinski's followers into the Alliance.

    On the whole, however, the commendable actions of the Convention outweigh the unworthy ones. We have hopes that with the reorganization of the Central Administration and the replacement in the editorial department of Zgoda, God's peace will reign within the Alliance instead of its usual bickerings; that 10instead of destructive activity and dissension, active work for the good of the Polish cause will be taken up. We believe that the Alliance will now enter upon the road of peace and tolerance, and we sincerely hope that it does. If it really does, we will never find expressions for the Alliance other than those of fraternal recognition.

    In Monday's issue of Dziennik [Chicagoski], we gave the last in a series of reports on the proceedings of the Polish National Alliance Convention. We tried to give an accurate ...

    Polish
    III B 4, II B 2 d 1, II B 1 c 3, I A 2 c, II D 1, III C, I E, I C, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- September 14, 1893
    Polish Roman Catholic Union under the Protection of the Blessed Virgin of Czestochowa Holds Convention in Chicago

    [Note: Organized in Chicago in 1887. Not affiliated with the Polish Roman Catholic Union of America.]

    The convention of the Polish Roman Catholic Union under the Protection of the Blessed Virgin of Czestochowa opened yesterday, September 12, at Pulaski Hall.

    Following the opening prayer, J. Herman, president of the organization, named J. Przymorski chairman, J. Kuczewski sergeant-at-arms, and O. Grochowski secretary.

    After the opening formalities were concluded, the delegates marched in a procession headed by the St. Gregory Krakus Society to St. Adalbert's church, where they 2attended Mass. Before the services, the Reverend J. Radziejewski addressed the delegates, commending them for their faithful adherence to the Catholic religion, an adherence which the last five difficult years had not succeeded in diminishing. He said that the Union sought to aid widows and orphans, that it helped preserve the Polish national spirit, and that it had nothing to do with the enemies of the Catholic Church. In conclusion, Father Radziejewski wished the Union every success, leaving it to the delegates to decide whether their organization should merge with one of the larger organizations or remain independent. He assured his listeners that God will always aid those who believe in Him. After Mass, the delegates returned to the convention hall.

    Chairman Przymorski made the first address of the day. He was followed by F. Smietanka, manager of Pulaski Hall, who greeted the delegates and put the hall at their disposal without charge. He said that the Union had done much to make this Polish Hall possible. He was vigorously applauded.

    3

    A credentials committee was then appointed, consisting of J. Napieralski, W. Jaworski, and M. Bielecki. On a motion by Delegate Maciejewski, the session was recessed for half an hour.

    The session was reopened at eleven o'clock and the credentials committee report was received.All credentials were accepted. The societies represented and their delegates to the Fifth Convention were as follows:

    St. Adalbert's Society was represented by O. Grochowski, J. Napieralski, I. Morzynski, and S. Budzbanowski; Heart of the Holy Virgin Mary, by F. Lamich and Jacob Kuczewski; Knights of St. Casimir, by F. Kaminski and Leon Maciejewski; Name of Jesus Society, by K. Gulcz and Vincent Jaworski; Brotherhood of St. Dominiek, by Joseph Herman and Martin Bielicki; St. Gregory Krakus Society, by B. L. Maciejewski and John Przymorski; St. Stanislaus Kostka Society, by J. Drzycinski; St. Casimir's Society (of St. Casimir's parish), by Alphonse Tokarski; St. Joseph's Society, by Francis Kolkowski; and St. Stanislaus Society 4of South Chicago, by Martin Borowczak.

    Altogether, there were eighteen delegates representing ten societies.

    Appointment of committees followed. The auditing committee consisted of J. Drzycimski, F. Kolkowski, and W. Jaworski. F. Kaminski, I. Morzynski, and K. Gulcz were appointed to the committee on motions and constitutional amendments.

    President J. Herman made a motion that a committee be appointed to invite the Reverend W. Radziejewski to attend the convention; the motion was carried. The committee included S. Budzbanowski, F. Lamich, and J. Napieralski. After the reading and acceptance of the minutes of the Fourth Convention, the session was adjourned until two o'clock in the afternoon.

    5

    Afternoon Session

    The afternoon session opened with a prayer. The committee reported that Father J. Radziejewski had promised to attend the convention in the company of two other priests. At this point, Father Radziejewski, his brother the Reverend S. Radziejeswski, and the Reverend Malkowski entered the hall. Father S. Reichstag and newly arrived from Europe, was an envoy to the German Reichstag and publisher of the Bytomsk Catholic [Bytomsk is located near Cracow]. The delegates greeted the clergymen by rising.

    The secretary-general next read the administration's annual report. It was accepted without question.

    The Reverend Stanislaus Radziejewski was asked to address the convention, which he did. In his long, beautiful address, Father Radziejewski pointed to the two aims of all our efforts: faith and nationalism. The speaker said that though 6he knew little of the Union, the reports which were read at this convention proved it to be an institution devoted to these two aims. "Rendering aid to widows and orphans," he said, "is always a good and noble deed. In any case, it is a wonderful thing that Poles can unite and hold conventions here on this free soil, that they can work together for the mutual good. In Poland, such things are either forbidden outright, or must be conducted under police supervision. In general, every organization, either religious, national, or industrial, is a good thing for our people. United, the Poles can do much. The Germans accomplished a great deal by uniting; so can the Poles." The speech was thunderously applauded.

    Following Father Radziejewski's address, the session was adjourned until later in the afternoon.

    7

    Election of Officers, Adjournment

    The financial statement presented by the secretary-general, F. Marcinkowski, for the period of September 1, 1892, to September 1, 1893, was as follows:

    Income for the fiscal year, $9,760.75; cash on hand at beginning year, $571.04; total $10,331.79. Expenditures totaled $9,582.50, leaving a cash balance of $749.29. In addition, organization pins on hand, valued at $79.50, and ten shares of stock in Pulaski Hall, value $100, bring the total assets to $928.79. During the past year, $9,000 in death benefits were paid; other expenditures included a total of $482.50 for nationalistic purposes and $100 for salary to the secretary-general. Since its organization five years ago, the institution has paid $28,800 in death benefits to its members. A recess of fifteen minutes followed this report.

    The session was resumed at four-thirty. As the result of a motion by S. Budzbanowski, the secretary-general reported that six hundred and seven members 8had paid their last assessment. The secretary-general also read a letter from St. Casimir's Society, of St. Casimir's parish, requesting financial aid.

    Further, a motion was made that the Union remain independent as heretofore. It was carried. Another motion, stating that all members of societies affiliated with the Union must be members of the Union also and contribute to the death benefit fund, was also carried. At six thirty, the convention adjourned until the following morning.

    Second day's session

    The second day's session opened at about ten o'clock in the morning, after the delegates had attended Requiem Mass, said for the intention of their departed brethren.

    J. Drzycimski was elected special secretary to read the constitution. Article V, 9paragraph one, of the constitution occasioned some discussion. Delegate Maciejewski proposed an amendment raising the annual dues to the Union to fifty cents and discontinuing the practice of special collections. It was finally decided to leave the paragraph unchanged, but in case the necessity should arise for a special collection, the administration and the delegates will be called together to adopt appropriate measures.

    Before further reading of the constitution, the auditing committee presented its report. It had found the accounts entirely in order.

    An amendment to paragraph two of Article VI of the constitution, proposed by J. Drzycimski, providing that all societies listing from ten to twenty-five members will be allowed one delegate to the convention, was accepted. (Heretofore, one delegate was allowed to societies listing from ten to fifty members).

    10

    At noon, the session was recessed until one o'clock, at which time, reading of the constitution continued.

    The secretary-general next read a telegram of greeting from the Censor and the Central Administration of the Polish National Alliance, expressing best wishes for the conventions's success and for continued efforts toward freedom, equality, and the spreading of Polish fame in America. The delegates acknowledged the greeting by rising.

    A motion by the delegate from the Name of Jesus Society, proposing that the death benefit be paid to an incurably crippled member, was defeated.

    An appeal in regard to the Polish Day celebration was read. Since all of the member societies of the Union have already signified their desire to participate in the celebration and are paying as much as fifty cents per member to this 11cause, it was decided that a special appropriation is unnecessary.

    After a short recess, the matter concerning the fifty dollars that had been offered to aid orphans several years ago was discussed. A commission, consisting of J. Drzycimski and B. L. Maciejewski, was appointed to dispose of the matter.

    A report on the agreement reached with St. Adalbert's parish was accepted.

    Twenty-five dollars was appropriated in compliance with a request for funds made by the St. Casimir's Society, and a like sum was appropriated for Masses. In addition, fifty dollars was donated to the new parochial school in St. Adalbert's parish. The secretary-general's salary will remain one hundred dollars per year; officers of the convention will be paid three dollars per day.

    A commission including O. Grochowski, J. Napieralski, and B. L. Maciejewski 12was appointed to investigate the possibility of establishing an organ for the Union. It was decided also, to purchase three more shares of stock in Pulaski Hall.

    The election of officers resulted as follows: Joseph Napieralski, president; Francis Kaminski, vice-president; 0. Grochowski, secretary-general; Stanislaus Budzbanowski, treasurer. The advisory board consists of W. Jaworski, F. Lamich, L. Maciejewski, F. Kolkowski, M. Bielicki, and Jacob Kuczewski.

    The new administration took office immediately, the old president administering the oath.

    After the chairman had thanked the delegates for their presence, and the priests for their attendance and kind words, the convention was adjourned.

    [Note: Organized in Chicago in 1887. Not affiliated with the Polish Roman Catholic Union of America.] The convention of the Polish Roman Catholic Union under the Protection of the Blessed ...

    Polish
    III B 4, II B 1 c 3, I A 2 c, III B 2, II D 1, II D 10, II D 6, III C, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- September 12, 1894
    Fair in Saint John Cantius Parish

    The subject of all conversations in Saint John Cantius Parish is the coming fair. Everybody is asking when it will begin and who will participate in it. To satisfy this curiosity, I will give here some details about the coming event.

    The fair is for the benefit of the Saint John Cantius Parochial School and will be opened on Saturday, September 15, at 7:30 P.M. It will last until October 7.

    Admission fee will be ten cents. Tickets for the duration of the fair will cost one dollar. Regular admission tickets will be sold at the gate but tickets for the duration of the fair must be obtained at the rectory.

    As to who will participate in the fair, I hope that all Saint Cantius parishioners and as many members from other parishes as possible, will come. Admission will be free on the opening day. The fair will be open daily, except Wednesday and Friday.

    2

    Thirty societies and fraternities from Saint Stanislaus Kostka and Saint John Cantius parishes will participate in the fair in the following order: (Societies will receive free tickets for their members on the days set aside for them).

    Saturday, September 15: Admission free for everyone.

    Sunday, September 16: Saint Joseph Aid Society, St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish--tickets sold by Stephen Konkel, 637 Dickson Street; Sacred Heart of Jesus Society, Saint Stanislaus Kostka Parish--at 4 P.M., has its own orchestra, tickets sold by John Kroll, 642 Holt Avenue; Third Order of Saint Francis Society, Saint Stanislaus Kostka Parish--tickets sold by Paul Figura, 50 Augusta Street.

    Monday, September 17: Saints Peter and Paul Society, Saint John Cantius Parish--tickets sold by Martin Ptaszek, 85 Front Street; Saint Hedwig Society, same parish--tickets sold by Mary Skrzypczak, 273 center Avenue.

    Tuesday, September 18: King Ladislaus Society, Saint John Cantius Parish--tickets sold by Valentine Michalski, 26 Fry Street; Bricklayers and Plasterers Society, Saint Stanislaus Kostka Parish--tickets sold by Michael Tomczak, 34 Will Street.

    3

    Thursday, September 20: Saint Stanislaus Kostka Cadets, Saint Stanislaus Kostka Parish--tickets sold by Mr. Kamek, 644 Ashland Avenue; Saint John Cantius Society, Saint John Cantius Parish--tickets sold by Francis Sobieszczak, 321 Sangamon Street; Women's Rosary Sodality, Saint John Cantius Parish--tickets sold by the secretary. Time: 2 P.M.

    Saturday, September 22: Saint Michael Archangel Society, Saint Stanislaus Kostka Parish--tickets sold by Andrew Nowicki, 865 Dickson Street; Saint John the Baptist Society, same parish--tickets sold by John Trojanowski, 150 Blackhawk Street.

    Sunday, September 23: Saint Adalbert Society, Saint Stanislaus Kostka Parish--tickets sold by Ignace Krusinski, 678 Dickson Street; Saint Stanislaus Kostka Society, same parish--tickets sold by Stanislaus Urbanowski, 58 Augusta Street.

    Monday, September 24: Saint Ignatius Society, Saint John Cantius Parish--tickets sold by John Dunczyk, 341 Carpenter Street; Saint Casimir Youth Fraternal Society, same parish--tickets sold by John Kielminski, 83 Front Street.

    4

    Tuesday, September 25: Holy Cross Society. Saint John Cantius Parish--tickets sold by Lewis Kalisz, 73 Front Street; Ladies' Rosary Sodality, Saint Stanislaus Kostka Parish--tickets sold by the secretary. Time at the fair: 2 P.M.

    Thursday, September 27: Saint Cecilia Society, Saint Stanislaus Kostka Parish--tickets sold by Ladislaus Barwig, 655 Dickson Street; School children from Saint John Cantius Parish. Time at the fair: 2 P.M.

    Saturday, September 29: Saints Peter and Paul Society, Saint Stanislaus Kostka Parish--tickets sold by Charles Armgardt, 523 Paulina Street; Saint Hyacinth Society, same parish--tickets sold by John Block, 692 Holt Street; Young Ladies' Rosary Sodality, same parish--tickets sold by Josephine Dudzik, 11 Chapin Street.

    Sunday, September 30: Saint Barbara Society, Saint Stanislaus Kostka Parish--tickets sold by Frances Zyla, 38 Fox Place; Saint Joseph Society, same parish--tickets sold by Joseph Pankowski, 65 Sangamon Street.

    5

    Monday, October 1: Saint Cyril and Methodius Society, Saint Stanislaus Kostka Parish--tickets sold by John Mysecki, 120 Front Street; Saint Joseph Youth Society, Saint John Cantius Parish--tickets sold by John Poczoski, 94 Front Street.

    Tuesday, October 2: Ladislaus Jagello Society, Saint John Cantius Parish--tickets sold by Francis Centnarowicz, 3 Augusta Street.

    Thursday, October 4: Holy Tamperance Society, Saint John Cantius Parish--tickets sold by John Dunczyk, 341 Carpenter Street; Young Ladies' Rosary Sodality, same parish--tickets sold by the secretary.

    Saturday, October 6: Saint John Cantius Cadets Society --tickets sold by Francis Centnarowicz, 25 Alston Avenue; Polish Cadets Society. Saint Stanislaus Kostka Parish--tickets sold by Bartholomew Fradzinski.

    Sunday, October 7, is the last day of the fair.

    Notice: Societies desiring to have a day at the fair and free tickets are requested

    6

    to get in touch with the pastor of Saint John Cantius Parish.

    Reverend John Kasprzycki, C.R.

    The subject of all conversations in Saint John Cantius Parish is the coming fair. Everybody is asking when it will begin and who will participate in it. To satisfy this ...

    Polish
    II B 1 c 3, III C, I A 2 c
  • Zgoda -- November 14, 1894
    Lottery at Holy Trinity to raise funds for a new School

    The fantastic lottery held during the week of November 4 - 11 at the Holy Trinity Hall to raise funds for a new school was a huge success. Some of the prizes raffled were mattresses, kitchen sets, etc. The lottery wheels contributed a good amount for this cause, as did the young ladies selling refreshments. Many church organizations came to this affair in groups and took part in all the different lotteries and games of chance, hoping to win a doll, ham or chicken. The bar was permitted to sell wine, beer, and liquors to all the patrons except minors. Polish and English music was furnished for the people wishing to dance, the net profits of this affair amounted to over $7,000. The committee and the pastor of the church take this opportunity to thank all the people for their good and kind hearted support.

    The fantastic lottery held during the week of November 4 - 11 at the Holy Trinity Hall to raise funds for a new school was a huge success. Some of ...

    Polish
    III C, I A 2 c
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- November 30, 1894
    November Manifestation in Holy Trinity Parish

    A patriotic manifestation commemorating the November insurrection of the Poles against Russia in 1830 was held last night at the Holy Trinity Parish Hall through the efforts of all parish societies. The affair was opened by S. Terczewski, who called upon S. F. Adalia Satalecki and J. J. Chrzanowski to act as chairman and recording secretary respectively.

    Reverend Casimir Sztuczko, pastor, who delivered the first address, urged work and sacrifice for Poland. A historical speech was given by I. Machnikowski. Other speakers were T. Rudzinski, Mrs. Kadis, and Anthony Stefanowicz, who spoke in Lithuanian.

    Declamations were made by Casimir Adamowski, Miss P. Sniegocka, and A. Lisztewnik. A piano solo was rendered by Mrs. Lande. Solos were sung by Miss A. Wojtalewicz and Mr. Gatkowski. Songs were also given by the Chopin 2and Wanda Choirs.

    At the close of the exercise a collection which netted $37.15 was taken for the Holy Trinity School. One fourth of this sum was turned over to the Rapperschwil Fund.

    Upon a motion made by John F. Smulski, it was agreed to send a letter of thanks to Dr. Lewakowski for his stand at the Austrian parliament in Vienna in behalf of the Poles. In this respect a committee composed of Reverend C. Sztuczko, J.F. Smulski, and E. Z. Brodowski was chosen to take care of the matter.

    A patriotic manifestation commemorating the November insurrection of the Poles against Russia in 1830 was held last night at the Holy Trinity Parish Hall through the efforts of all parish ...

    Polish
    III B 2, I A 2 c, III C, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- May 11, 1895
    Benefit Ball to Be Given at Pulaski Hall

    Through the combined efforts of all the societies of St. Adalbert Parish, a benefit ball will be given tomorrow, starting at 4 P. M., at Pulaski Hall.

    According to an understanding reached by the delegates of the societies, one-third of the proceeds are to go toward Pulaski Hall and the other two-thirds toward the church and school of St. Adalbert Parish. This hall will also serve as an example of the unity, harmony and co-operation of the Polish societies of the parish.

    A program will take place before the dancing begins. A speech of welcome will be given by W. J. Pijanowski. Reverend John Radziejewski, pastor of St. Adalbert Parish, and Casimir Zychlinski will also speak.

    Invitations were sent to all societies, including those of the Polish National 2Alliance and the Polish Roman Catholic Union. A capacity crowd is expected.

    Through the combined efforts of all the societies of St. Adalbert Parish, a benefit ball will be given tomorrow, starting at 4 P. M., at Pulaski Hall. According to an ...

    Polish
    III C, I A 2 c, III B 2, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- May 25, 1895
    Financial Report of Benefit Ball Staged by St. Adalbert Parish Societies

    On May 12 the societies of St. Adalbert Parish staged a benefit ball at Pulaski Hall; its results were satisfactory. The committee in charge, comprised of representatives of the various societies, wishes to extend an old-fashioned Polish "thank you" to the speakers, military societies and civil societies for their co-operation.

    The financial statement is as follows:

    Income

    Wardrobe $2.60
    Refreshments 8.65
    Tickets sold at Hall 48.75
    Bar [drinks] 219.30
    Tickets sold by societies 188.75
    Total $468.05
    2

    Expenses

    J. I. Migdalski (printing) $6.50
    B. Z. Maciejewski (ham, lemons, etc) 8.07
    Christ Bronder (cigars) 21.20
    R. Hensel (music) 64.00
    J. Bonk and Marcinkowski (hall and drinks) 99.05
    J. Michalowski (cigars) 6.40
    Total $205.22

    This resulted in a net profit of $262.83. This sum was divided as follows: One third, $87.61, for the benefit of the Pulaski Hall; and two thirds, $175.22, to J. Radziejewski, pastor of St. Adalbert Parish for the benefit of the church and school. The committee suggested the purchase of a canopy for the church.

    In the name of the committee thanks are extended to all the supporters of this cause.

    Stephen Napieralski

    On May 12 the societies of St. Adalbert Parish staged a benefit ball at Pulaski Hall; its results were satisfactory. The committee in charge, comprised of representatives of the various ...

    Polish
    III C, I A 2 c
  • [Association documents] -- April 04, 1904
    Sinai Congregation, Annual Meeting Minutes

    Dr. Hirsch responded with a brief address to the effect that in his opinion a new Temple was essential to the future growth of the congregation; that the present building was unsuitable for the purpose of the Sabbath School on account of the distance from the residence of a large number of the members and on account of the character of the neighborhood. He also referred to the inadequate ventilation of the auditorium. He also called attention to the fact, that the present building furnished very inadequate facilities for meetings of the auxiliary societies and other worthy purposes.

    Dr. Hirsch responded with a brief address to the effect that in his opinion a new Temple was essential to the future growth of the congregation; that the present building ...

    Jewish
    III A, III C, I A 2 c
  • Narod Polski -- July 11, 1906
    Poles in Chicago Convention of Polish Women's Alliance

    The Polish Women's Alliance finished its sixth convention last week.

    Several resolutions were adopted for support of the organization.

    Important items of the resolution were on the gradual assessment.

    They also elected a commission to deliberate on the problem, and set aside a sum for educational purposes.

    The Polish Women's Alliance finished its sixth convention last week. Several resolutions were adopted for support of the organization. Important items of the resolution were on the gradual assessment. They ...

    Polish
    III B 2, I K, III B 4, I A 2 c
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 25, 1907
    A Magnificent Concert

    This Sunday, January 27th, at 8 P. M. in the Schoenhofen Hall there will be held an unusual interesting concert consisting of song. It shall be performed by the Stanislaus Dramatic Male Choir Society under the direction of the talented Mr. F. Kondziorski, who for several months has been preparing the production of an elaborate program.

    For the first time in the history of Chicago there will be sung in Polish Mr. K. Gounod's prominent masterpiece, "Kowadlo"; also a new creation of Mr. Wiedeman's "Wisla." There will also be the singing of Mr. Demunski's creations, "Songs of our Nation." Mr. A. J. Kwasigroch, a popular male tenor, will also be present to portray his talent.

    Dancing will take place after the concert. The fund received from this concert will be donated toward a new school of St. Stanislaus.

    This Sunday, January 27th, at 8 P. M. in the Schoenhofen Hall there will be held an unusual interesting concert consisting of song. It shall be performed by the Stanislaus ...

    Polish
    I A 2 c, II B 1 a, IV