The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- September 29, 1891
    Is it Possible? (Editorial)

    In the issue for September 26 of this year of Ameryka--a journal well-known for the publishing of deliberate falsehoods--we read an extensive account of the convention of the Polish National Alliance, which was held in Detroit, Michigan. One of the paragraphs in this article reads as follows:

    "A resolution was adopted to condemn the following Polish newspapers: Wiarus, Polak W Ameryce, Wiara I Ojczyzna, and Dziennik Chicagoski. The editors of these newspapers were accused of dishonesty and branded as outcasts."

    Is it possible that such a public resolution was adopted by the convention of the Polish National Alliance? We will admit that a certain organization may not like the policy of a particular newspaper; we will also admit that such an organization may even, in its private meetings, condemn that newspaper, but to 2accuse the editors publicly of dishonesty or brand them as outcasts at a convention about which even other nationalities talk and write, just because they are exponents of different ideas, would be taking a great responsibility. It would, in fact, be disgraceful.

    We did not believe that the paragraph which we read was true. In order to verify it, we made a private investigation by asking some delegates to the convention whether these reports were true. All delegates whom we asked categorically denied that the second part of the above-mentioned paragraph was true; besides, all of them asserted that Dziennik Chicagoski was not even mentioned at the convention. Others stated, in addition, that the resolution against Wiara I Ojczyzna (Faith and Country) was not adopted.

    At any rate, this curious item was published in Ameryka, and as long as there is no official denial, we will not know whether it is true or not. If it is not true, we expect official retraction. We would like to know and we must know whether the Polish National Alliance takes the responsibility for such 3a resolution or whether Ameryka is guilty of misrepresentation of the facts.

    Ameryka also states that W. Prybeski was elected censor, and Rewerski assistant censor, of the Polish National Alliance, and H. Nagiel, was chosen as editor of Zgoda.

    Finally, we demand that the publishers of Ameryka disclose, according to the permission given them, the name of the correspondent who "can prove" that there is no dependable Polish school in Chicago; that the teachers in Polish parochial schools do not know how to write Polish and yet teach it to others; that the Catholic Church forbids sending children to American public schools, on account of which the Poles are afraid to educate their children; that if any Pole sends his children to a high school and wishes to prepare them to become decent citizens, he is immediately condemned publicly by the priests from the pulpits, and is ostracized by the other Poles; that our priests commit crimes mentioned by the correspondent, and so on.

    In the issue for September 26 of this year of Ameryka--a journal well-known for the publishing of deliberate falsehoods--we read an extensive account of the convention of the Polish National ...

    Polish
    II B 2 d 1, I A 1 a, I A 2 a, I A 2 b, III B 2, III B 4, III C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- December 05, 1891
    Retrogression of German

    There are Christian churches in eastern cities which were founded by Germans years ago, but where services are now held in English only. At the present time such retrogressions do not occur frequently. The hot battle that was fought for the continuation of Protestant and Catholic German parochial schools assures the maintainance of German in the churches at the same time.

    It is regretable, however, that the German language is more and more supplanted by English in some of the Jewish temples because the rising generation desires it. Quite a few of the outstanding German rabbies in this country were substituted with English-Jewish clergymen, because of their inability to master both languages thoroughly. It must be admitted that the younger generation in the Jewish congregations, who desire the change are usually very generous towards their German clergymen thus forced to resign.

    Of course, the rising generation of the Jews in this country has the right and privilege to make rules and regulations in their inherited temples according to their own desires. But just as indisputable is the right of the German-American 2Press to deplore the retrogression of the German language among such a capable race. The most splendid achievements in Jewish pulpit oratory in the United States are and remain German.

    There are Christian churches in eastern cities which were founded by Germans years ago, but where services are now held in English only. At the present time such retrogressions do ...

    German
    III C, I A 2 b, III A, III C, III A
  • Abendpost -- March 18, 1892
    The Oppenents of the Illinois School Law.

    As the enemies of the proposed new Illinois School Law are on the increase, the Republican sponsors of this unfortunate and malicious law are changing tactics, and this only is due consideration of the coming Presidental election.

    Now these Republicans, propose and promise the complete rejection of the whole School Law, in its present form. But they are leaving so many back doors and classes open for the comback of the said law, that we cannot trust the Republican standpoint. From the beginning of this fight, the Democrats, have stressed the standpoint, to accept the School Enforcement Law, but at the same time to report as a principal any School Language instruction Law. But the Republicans insisted, that not only in public schools but also in Church and private schools the Language of instruction should be exclusively English. Time will show, which way the Public and the voters will force the issue.

    As the enemies of the proposed new Illinois School Law are on the increase, the Republican sponsors of this unfortunate and malicious law are changing tactics, and this only is ...

    German
    I A 2 b
  • Abendpost -- March 18, 1892
    The Opponents of the Illinois School-Law.

    As the enemies of the proposed new Illinois School law are on the increase, the Republican sponsors of this unfortunate and malicious law are changing tactics, and this only in due consideration of the coming presidential election.

    Now these Republicans, propose and promise the complete rejection of the whole School Law, in its present form. But they are leaving so many back doors and classes open for the comeback of the said law, that we cannot trust the Republican standpoint. From the beginning of this fight, the Democrats, have stressed the standpoint, to accept the School Enforcement Law, but at the same time to report as a principal, any School Language instruction Law. But the Republicans insisted, that not only in public schools but also in church and private schools, the language of instruction should be exclusively English. Time will show, which way the public and the voters will force the issue.

    As the enemies of the proposed new Illinois School law are on the increase, the Republican sponsors of this unfortunate and malicious law are changing tactics, and this only in ...

    German
    I A 1 b, I A 2 b, I A 2 a
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 18, 1892
    German Theological Seminary.

    Six young students of the German Theological Seminary, went through their examinations recently. The German Theological Siminary, is located at Ashland Avenue and Augusta Street, and is under the direction of Rev. J. D. Severinghaus. The directors of the seminary held two conferences yesterday, in which they consulted about a new constitution for this institution.

    The directors have made an appeal to the friends of the seminary for financial support. It is pointed out that this institution has trained and educated fifty young men for the ministry since its foundation in 1885; and that it is entirely dependent upon voluntary contribution for its maintenance. The expenses of the institution are estimated as follows: salary and rent for the professors $1,750; board and lodging for ten students $800; heat and light $250; miscellaneous expenses $200. This is a total of $3,000, for the training of twenty-one students. The synod to which this church belongs has appropriated $5,000; for the payment of debts of the seminary.

    Six young students of the German Theological Seminary, went through their examinations recently. The German Theological Siminary, is located at Ashland Avenue and Augusta Street, and is under the direction ...

    German
    I A 1 b, I A 2 b, I A 2 a
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 10, 1892
    Missouri Synod

    The Illinois district of the Missouri Synod, appointed a committee for the Chicago exposition. This committee informed the teachers of the synod what they expect to exhibit and the following things are mentioned:

    1. Plans and drawings of schoolhouses as they were at the establishment of the synod, and what they are today.

    2. School work:

    a/ English and German specimen of writing.

    b/ Brief German and English essays

    c/ Solutions of mathematical problems in English.

    d/ Drawings.

    e/ Drawings of maps.

    f/ Answers to questions in writing about geography and history.

    g/ Lessons in grammar in German and English.

    3. Photographs of groups and classes of scholars.

    2

    4. All schoolbooks and all of the volumes of school papers.

    5. Teaching material, such as maps, globes, reading cards, biblical pictures, cards for pictorial instructions, etc.

    6. Lesson tablets and time tablets in German and English.

    7. Statistics about the developments and growth of schools.

    8. Collections of insects, stones, birds, shells etc, which are used for instructions.

    The Illinois district of the Missouri Synod, appointed a committee for the Chicago exposition. This committee informed the teachers of the synod what they expect to exhibit and the following ...

    German
    I A 2 a, I A 2 b, III C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 25, 1892
    Crusade against Hatred of Germanism.

    The German-haters are again busy in different states. Again they are aiming their attacks against the German language.

    Instructions in German in our public schools is a thorn in the scanty flesh of the hating Know-Nothings. Since they succeeded in suppressing German in St. Louis, one of the strong holds of Germanism, they have become assertive.

    The Germans not only have to keep up the fight for German in public schools, but must also continually defend their own schools if they do not wish to be defeated.

    2

    If, for instance, the present election campaign against the Edward Law fails, the Know-Nothings in other states would immediately attempt to suppress German in their public schools by a similar law.

    For the sake of self-preservation, as well as for the welfare of German-Americanism in general, the Germans in Illinois must summon their whole forces, in order to complete the victory at the coming election, which they won in part only in November, 1890, through the election of Raab.

    We have often stated the irrefutable reasons why we can accomplish this only if Altgeld is elected, and if the state legislature is composed of a majority of men, who will treat this burning question as did the recent Democratic state legislature of Wisconsin. The Germans of Chicago and 3Illinois are preparing to form a united and invincible front against the haters of Germanism. Previous religious differences and discords are ignored. We see, for instance, the following announcement in Catholic papers:

    "The German Catholics are now beginning to organize themselves on the school question. The organization is preparing for a large convention, which is soon to be held in Chicago. We understand that this convention will make resolutions favoring the Democratic candidate upon the ballot, and other resolutions which are in accord with those of the Lutherans."

    The Protestant German church members will not permit the friendly attitude of the Catholics toward the Lutherans to react to the former's disgrace. Neither will this happen to those Germans who have no religious affiliation, because this matter is a question of life or death for them.

    4

    Everything points to the fact that Altgeld, and the German school will win a brilliant and definite victory at the November election.

    The German-haters are again busy in different states. Again they are aiming their attacks against the German language. Instructions in German in our public schools is a thorn in the ...

    German
    I A 1 b, I A 2 b, II B 2 f, III A, I F 1, I F 4, III C, I C, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- July 05, 1892
    Poles in Chicago

    The final exercises of the scholastic year of 1891-1892 in the school of the Venerable Sisters of Nazareth were held in the afternoon of July 2 in the hall located at 112 West Division Street. The downpour of rain, which had continued during the entire forenoon, subsided in time to permit the large audience to gather in the hall, which was decorated in greens and beautiful flowers. The attendance, to a large extent, consisted of the parents of the pupils of the school. The exercises turned out quite well and would have been an even greater success had not thick clouds gathered toward the close, causing the Venerable Sister Superior to eliminate several numbers of a lengthy program. From what had been exhibited we are convinced that the Venerable Sisters possess excellent methods of teaching, and that they are experienced and hard-working teachers. We repeat this with pleasure because we have seen that from the standpoint of the youthfulness of the pupils, the Venerable Sisters have satisfied the most exacting pedagogic demands. The Misses M. Barzynska, W. Wleklinska, Z. Brodowska, M. Schultz, G. Pankowna, F. Daniszowna, M. Makowska, K. Magnosowna, 2and Z. Waszewska, played musical compositions on the piano with precision and vivacity, bringing real honor to the Venerable Teachers and revealing [like-wise] the ability and the diligence of the pupils. Two of them surpassed the others, and one of these two was nearly exhausted with weariness; but in spite of this she played her music excellently. Who are they? That we will not tell for fear of awakening vanity in young hearts. Maybe we shall divulge their names next year--God willing--if they do not permit others to surpass them.

    In elocution an acknowledgement of priority is due Miss R. Sniegowska, and that from the standpoint of her accent and clear Polish speech as well as the deep emotion with which she recited. The difficult text of the dialogue by Syrokoma, "Jan Deborog," was declaimed by M. Barzynska, M. Wleklinska, and H. Made jowna in a fashion excellent beyond our expectations. Equally good were the German declamation by M. Bardonska and those in English by M. Wleklinska and K. Magnosowna. The Polish declamations also left nothing to be desired; these were delivered by L. Bardonska, A. Nicka, K. Polencowna, M. Skorupa, T. Wleklinska, M. Rura, T. Lewandowska, J. Tafinska, E. Herkowna, L. Marszalkiewicz, St. Tylska, 3and W. Rozanska.

    The brief plays, partly humorous and partly emotional and serious, were excellently selected and brought real honors to the young actors. Exceptionally beautiful was "The Letter to Our Lady of Sorrow and Joy". We regret that the names of the boys and girls who enacted the plays are not known to us; let them, however, learn and work further, like the proverbial hidden violet.

    Among the Polish priests present were the Reverend Fathers Kobrzynski, J. Barzynski, Snigulski, and A. Nowicki.

    Wishing a joyful vacation to the dear children, we cordially recommend the Venerable Sisters and the truly meritorious English teacher to all the Polish parents residing in Chicago and its vicinity for their conscientious and able work. We recommend the school of the Venerable Sisters of Nazareth as a perfect institution in every branch of Polish education.

    The final exercises of the scholastic year of 1891-1892 in the school of the Venerable Sisters of Nazareth were held in the afternoon of July 2 in the hall located ...

    Polish
    I A 2 a, I A 2 b
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- August 01, 1892
    The Dedication of the Cornerstone for the School of the Venerable Sisters of Nazareth

    A crowd of several thousand people gathered yesterday, at 2 P. M., to witness the ceremony of laying the cornerstone of the beautiful edifice on West Division Street which is to house the Polish high school of the Venerable Sisters of Nazareth.

    Architect Diethelm and contractors Ratkowski and Ostrowski, well known in Polish circles, are in charge of the work.

    A little before 3 P. M., the marchers began to arrive--first the mounted marshals, followed by the brave Cadets of St. Stanislaus Kostka parish, and then the Guards of the Queen of the Polish Crown, of the same parish. The platform, upon which a throne for the Archbishop had been erected, was occupied by a number of priests--Reverends Vincent Barzinski, 2Joseph Barzynski, Theophilus Szypkowski, Simon Kobrzynski, Le Grand, Snigurski, Domogalski, J. Kasprzycki, A. Nowicki, and Lipski.

    A reporter of the Daily News and the editors of the Telegraph and Wiara i Ojczyzna (Faith and Fatherland) were among those present. Mr. Peter Kiolbassa, recalling his military days, busied himself in assigning positions to the marshals and to a great extent, in controlling the throng.

    The weather was favorable, and the heat was not as intense as it had been in the past several days.

    The foot of the platform and the stairs leading to it were occupied by the pupils of the Venerable Sisters of Nazareth. The children were dressed in white, and were under the guardianship of the Sisters.

    3

    The Most Reverend Archbishop, who had donned his pontifical robes at the Polish Orphanage, was escorted to the platform by the Reverends Kasprzycki and Le Grand, who were attired in dalmatics.

    The cornerstone, to the right of the main entrance and bearing the inscription "J. M. J., Erected A. D. 1892", was bedecked with garlands of natural foliage and two bouquets of natural flowers, one on each side.

    After the performance of the required rituals--singing of prayers, psalms, and the recital of the Litany of All Saints, during which both the devout and the clergy knelt down--the copper box containing the usual erectional document, written in Latin on celluloid paper, was sealed and placed into the opening in the stone and encased with bricks.

    After this ceremony the Most Reverend Archbishop went to his throne, and the 4Reverend Snigurski addressed the crowd. "Some sixty years ago," he said, "the Poles began to arrive in Chicago because of the persecution to which they were subjected by the three confiscatory governments. They arrived here with a Polish song upon their lips, with a deep love for the Polish nationality and an abiding attachment to the Catholic religion in their hearts. Even though not many of their homes had as yet been built, nevertheless the Poles soon got busy in erecting a divine edifice, for the Polish heart cannot do without Polish churches, Polish prayers, and Polish hymns. As long as we will do this, we need not fear the enemy.

    "Along with the building of a church, they thought of the building of a Catholic school in which their children could learn to love God, Poland, and the Polish language. A Pole who says that he is a Catholic but who is ashamed of or neglects the Polish language, is not a true Catholic. As long as Poland stood by the Catholic religion, she was strong and famous; hence, stand by this religion and become strong. But let no one who professes 5this religion deny his Polish nationality, for that would be contrary to God, by whose will nationalities exist.

    "You should educate your children for God and Poland, since no other nation will do that for you. An alien will not teach us Polish patriotism; therefore, we are in need of Polish educators, who would teach our children that a sensible person will never deny that he is a Pole, that he is a Catholic. Your children will learn to love God and Poland in this new school. Endeavor, therefore, to elevate the Polish schools in general by sending your children to them. God will bless your efforts, and you will have good children, who will honor and respect you. You will have an easy death because of the conviction that you have fulfilled your obligations to God and country. Furthermore, after death, you will have the joy of seeing your children in heaven, because he who truly loves God and his motherland will not be deprived of heavenly reward.

    "Let us never lose our spirit in the presence of opposition arising from 6everywhere; let us constantly combat evil, and God will aid us."

    The place of the reverend speaker was taken by the Most Reverend Archbishop himself. "We are laying a cornerstone for a Polish school," he said. "I am inexplicably glad of this, because I am aware that this school will at the same time be Catholic. It will be a beautiful evidence of how the greatly sacrificing Polish nationality is attached to the Catholic Church, this Church of their fathers. I know that the Poles endeavor to see that their children obtain an education in schools founded in the spirit of our Holy Church. I am glad of this and praise you for it, and for that reason I sincerely offer this school to you, whose students will be equally good Catholics and good Poles."

    After these brief and sincere words, which created a great impression upon the audience, the Most Reverend Archbishop left for the Polish Orphanage, where he examined two classes, in which he was welcomed by the songs of the little orphans. After this, he changed his pontifical robes 7and, in company of the clergy, came to visit the Venerable Sisters of Nazareth, who received him with great hospitality, after the old Polish manner.

    Our wish for the Venerable Sisters is that the number of their pupils increase twofold and that their conscientious efforts and their fundamental educational training may find a proper field of activity.

    A crowd of several thousand people gathered yesterday, at 2 P. M., to witness the ceremony of laying the cornerstone of the beautiful edifice on West Division Street which is ...

    Polish
    I A 2 a, I A 2 b, II D 4, III A, III C, I B 4, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- October 07, 1892
    The Polish Democratic League of Illinois Appeals to the Poles

    The Polish Democratic League of Illinois deems it its duty to bring to the attention of the Poles certain points of importance relative to the present election campaign. The Polish Democratic League is not stepping to the fore with a partisan (sic) point of view. This declaration is made because it wishes to protect its and the Polish people's interest. Upon the consideration of these interests, the Polish Democratic League must condemn the party which is not only perpetrating acts of violence but is trying to deprive of their rights not only the Polish people but the poor people at large and all those not of the millionaire class. Yes, this party is trying to make all of us blind tools in their hands--to mold us into slaves of the capitalistic system, dominated by millionaires. These are the efforts that are being expended by the Republican party.

    One of the first points which must be brought out is called the "Force Bill," which states that if two citizens in any city over 20,000 population declare 2before the district marshal that they do not believe that the election in this or that precinct can be carried out to the fullest extent of the law, then the said marshal can appoint two so-called special deputies to inspect the votes, deny the right to vote, count the ballots, and give a full report on the results.

    This law was created by the Republican party, and in the present campaign the party has decided to take advantage of it. At present the Republican District Marshal Hitchock has appointed two thousand such special deputies.

    Our citizens should not pay any attention to these special deputies, should ignore their idle talk and should vote as they desire. These so-called special deputies do not have any right to intimidate or influence any of the voters. In the event that such a special deputy denies anyone the right to vote, he must at the same time make and swear out an affidavit before the election judge. When such an affidavit is executed against one of the Polish voters, he should not sign it, for these special deputies are apt to do most anything to prevent one from voting. If some of the Polish voters do not 3know how to speak English they can get an interpreter.

    The second point of importance in this state is the school question. A law proposed and supported by the Republicans declares that: A school which is not recognized by the director of public schools will not be considered as legitimate, and parents who send their children to such a school, and not to a public school, will be subject to a fine of from two to twenty dollars.

    This proposal is a direct blow at the parochial schools, which the Republican party, composed of Methodists, Baptists and representatives of other sects not of the Roman Catholic faith, wishes to see destroyed. We know only too well the position and significance of our schools, for the public schools do not give religious instruction. We know that in our schools the children are able to learn the Polish language and receive instruction in the Roman Catholic religion. This is why we should protect our schools!

    These are the facts which the Polish Democratic League of Illinois wishes to 4bring to light and careful consideration.

    Brochures and circulars relative to these matters may be had upon writing to the secretary of the Polish Democratic League; they will be sent without charge.

    Peter Kiolbassa, president

    M. J. Szameit, secretary

    The Polish Democratic League of Illinois deems it its duty to bring to the attention of the Poles certain points of importance relative to the present election campaign. The Polish ...

    Polish
    I F 2, I A 2 a, I A 2 b, I F 1, III C, I E, IV