The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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You are looking at one result from the German group.
This group has 7091 other articles.

This article was published in 1891.
647 articles were published that year.

This article has a primary subject code of "Relations with Homeland" (III H).
2067 articles share this primary code.

  • Chicago Tribune -- January 06, 1891
    No Official Recognition

    It has been suggested that the German-American societies in Chicago should unite and form an organization of German-American citizens for the promotion of the Fair in Germany as the former residents of different States who now reside in Chicago have done in this country. Washington Hesing of the Staats-Zeitung doesn't think such an organization of the German-American societies would accomplish any good.

    "I don't think the German-American societies could be organized for such purpose," he said yesterday. "There isn't a very strong affinity between those societies here. I can see how the various State associations did some good for Chicago before the city was selected as a site for the Fair, as many of them had friends among the members of Congress whose votes could be influenced. It would be far different, however, in trying to accomplish anything with Germany. From all the information I can gather from my correspondence and talks with the travelers who come from there, the German Government will take no official recognition of the Fair. The Government in so disgusted with the McKinley Bill that it is not worth while to talk about it doing anything.

    2

    That is the situation now, of course. It is a long time until the Fair, and the feeling may change.

    "As to the German-American societies of Chicago having any influence in shaping the action of the Government it is idle to talk about it."

    German
    III H