The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 06, 1861
    Do We Need Foreign Mediation? (Editorial)

    We need foreign mediation as little as we need foreign help; in fact, we do not need any mediation, neither from home, nor from abroad. As far as foreign assistance is concerned, all that is necessary is that foreign powers, which are at peace with us, permit us to put out the fire that has been started in our house, and do not do anything to hinder us, and that they be not too critical of the method and means which we employ to extinguish the fire. We request the foreign powers to consider especially, that if we blockade Southern ports we are not blockading foreign ports, but our own ports, and that we have just as much right to do so, as the owner of a house has to lock the doors in order to capture a thief, or as the police have to barricade a street for the purpose of quelling a riot or protecting people against contagious disease. If the foreign nations, our friends, will bear in mind that the blockade of our Southern ports is more to our advantage than to their disadvantage, and 2that one section of international law specifically states: "No neutral power shall be incommodated or importuned by a military operation which is not more to the advantage of the warring nation than it is to the disadvantage of the neutral nation", and, accordingly, do not interfere with our conduct of the war, they will do all that we ask.

    According to the London Times, the English cabinet will offer its mediation as soon as hostilities have actually begun, and Governor Hicks, of Maryland has already made the proposal that the whole dispute be submitted to Lord Lyons for adjudication. Such a proposal, made by an American, amounts to an act of treason, and if made by the representatives of a foreign nation it must be looked upon as meddling, and rejected. What would Great Britain have said if America had offered her mediation when England was at war with the sepoys? His Majesty's Government would have given us the same answer that we will be obliged to give, and shall give, namely, that we do not negotiate with rebels, and that we shall suppress and subdue the Montgomery sepoys, just as England suppressed and subjected the sepoys of India. The 3only notes which one is wont to exchange with rebels are the paper in which powder and bullets are conveyed, and which are called shells, in military language.

    We need foreign mediation as little as we need foreign help; in fact, we do not need any mediation, neither from home, nor from abroad. As far as foreign assistance ...

    German
    I G
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 07, 1861
    The Germans (Editorial)

    In the border states, even in Texas and the extreme Southern states, all the Germans are true Americans; all are loyal to our Government.

    In Baltimore, Maryland, the Germans, one and all, are for the Union. The Germans in this city were the ones who hauled down the flag of the Secession, and everywhere in those parts of the city which are inhabited chiefly by Germans, the flag of the Union is proudly and boldly displayed.

    In St. Louis, the German element holds the Secessionists in complete check and the authorities of that city did not hesitate to furnish these Teutons with arms taken from the arsenal of the United States. Three thousand of these Germans enlisted under The Star-Spangled Banner, ready to defend the Union, the Constitution, liberty and justice against any enemy. Had it not been for these Germans, the State of Missouri would have proclaimed secession long ago.

    2

    Many of the volunteers who hail from our city are German. A number of companies are "all-German," and they were the first to be ready for combat. There are quite a few Germans in other companies also.

    The German hates the flag of the rebels, and this hate knows no bounds, he will never fight under the flag of secessonists; on the contrary, he will take up arms against it, even when confronted by superior forces.

    The hatred of the German race toward everything that savors of slavery is deadly. No doubt it emanates from the fact that the Germans are primarily a working people, who are very practical in everything they undertake, and that they have implicit trust in the possibility that some day humanity may be entirely freed from despotism, whether it be political, religious, or economic.

    Thank God that we have this element among us during these perilous times, when the black cohorts of slavery have arisen to fight against the advocates of those human rights, in defense of which all Christendom is ready to take up arms at this very moment.

    In the border states, even in Texas and the extreme Southern states, all the Germans are true Americans; all are loyal to our Government. In Baltimore, Maryland, the Germans, one ...

    German
    III D, I G
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 07, 1861
    Meeting of the German Ladies' Society

    The German Ladies' Society, which was organized for the purpose of furnishing lint, bandages and other materials for dressing wounds, and, above all, the money necessary to buy them, held a meeting [yesterday] at the German House. The attendance was not proportionate to the seriousness which German ladies and girls should show during times of great danger. The three members of the Committee, Mrs. Butz, Mrs. Schneider, and Mrs. Sparschuh waited patiently until 5 o'clock while a few individuals brought donations of lint, bandages, and money. The following contributions have been received to date:

    Collected by Mrs. Butz $37.10
    " " Mrs. Sparschuh 17.42
    " " Mrs. Schlund 10.14
    " " Mrs. Bahe 8.15
    " " Mrs. Bohrmann 4.62
    " " Mrs. Schneider 18.00
    " " Mrs. Gindele 4.00
    2
    Total $99.43

    The time of the next meeting will be published. In the meantime, ladies may leave their packages with Mrs. Butz, 127 North La Salle Street, or with Mrs. Schneider, 110 North Clark Street. German owners of dry goods stores are urgently requested to contribute some pieces of shirting, which is badly needed. The material may be left in the store of C. Vorpahl, 35 La Salle Street, where receipts for donations will be issued.....

    The German Ladies' Society, which was organized for the purpose of furnishing lint, bandages and other materials for dressing wounds, and, above all, the money necessary to buy them, held ...

    German
    III B 2, II D 10, I G
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 07, 1861
    The Meeting at the German House (Editorial)

    A number of Germans of this city held a meeting at the German House last Sunday. Mr. C. Butz was elected chairman and Mr. E. Seckel secretary. Although the meeting was not very well attended, a laudable zeal was displayed by the assembly, and great progress was made in matter pertaining to the support of the families of the volunteers who have left home to defend the Union and uphold our laws against anarchy and rebellion. Mr. D. Kletz, second lieutenant of the Union Rifle Company (composed of Germans of Chicago), who happened to be here on furlough, reported on conditions in Camp Springfield. He said that food was ample, but that complaints were made in regard to two matters: a lack of shirts and shoes was causing considerable dissatisfaction; furthermore, members of this company were troubled by the thought that their loved ones at home would not be cared for. From the interesting report which Mr. Eschenburg, a member of the Central Committee, rendered later it was noted that the cause for the first complaint, which was justified, had been removed, since a shipment of 2shoes and woolen shirts consigned to the aforementioned company had gone forward last Friday. In regard to the support of the families of soldiers in camp, Mr. Eschenburg informed the assembly that it had been resolved to give each mother who has two children in the service $3.00 per week and that this sum is to be decreased or increased according to circumstances. He also pointed out that the Central Committee spends thousands of dollars for this and other purposes, and that it was necessary to devise some way of furnishing the Committee with more funds. After a long debate, it was decided to propose, through the German member of the Committee, that the Committee appoint three persons in each ward to solicit subscriptions for monthly contributions to be paid during the duration of the war, and to be delivered to the Committee when collected. We hope that our German fellow citizens, especially those who have been blessed with much of this world's goods, will not fail to show their patriotism by generous subscriptions. But also the ones who are not rich can, and should, place their mite on the altar of the Fatherland and remember that the proverb, "many grains make a pile", is still true.

    A number of Germans of this city held a meeting at the German House last Sunday. Mr. C. Butz was elected chairman and Mr. E. Seckel secretary. Although the meeting ...

    German
    III D, I G
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 25, 1861
    Mass Meeting in Worker's Hall

    The following resolutions were adopted in a mass meeting which was held in Worker's Hall last evening:

    1)Resolved, that a safety committee consisting of five members be appointed to aid and advise all German depositors who wish to recover their bank deposits, either by employing friendly tactics, or, if necessary, through lawsuits, and to supply the means necessary to accomplish the purpose. This committee shall have authority to call a mass meeting if it deems it feasible.

    2) Resolved, that we condemn the banking systems which are employed in the United States, and especially the one in vogue in Illinois, as unstable and tending to enrich a few persons, while doing harm to the public in general, particularly to laborers.

    3) Resolved, that gold and silver are the only reliable and valid mediums 2of exchange, and that there is enough gold and silver in this country to meet the demands of all business.

    4) Resolved, that bankers are obliged by all principles of law and morals to pay depositors the full amounts deposited, and that a refusal to do so is a grave breach of confidence.

    5) Resolved, that we are greatly at the conduct of the German bank of Hoffmann and Gelpcke, which refuses to pay German citizens the full amount of their savings-accounts.

    6) Resolved, that we ask this bank to meet it's obligations in full, and to withhold no discounts from depositors.

    7) Resolved, that it is not our intention, illegally or unnecessarily, to incite the public against the bankers, and we regret to hear that German citizens are applying to the Commissioner of Police for protection for private 3persons who should have no reason to be afraid of appearing in public and trying to justify their actions.

    8) Resolved, that it is unnecessary and suporfluous that the Commissioner of Police engage special policemen to quell a disturbance that does not exist.

    9) Resolved, that we, the German inhabitants of Chicago, assembled in mass meeting, will recognize only metal as a meding of exchange in doing business with anyone in the future.

    10) Resolved, that from this day on, we will place all existing representative currency, be it issued in this or in other states, on the same level with all other goods which we consider valueless.

    11) Resolved, that the German residents of Illinois are hereby requested most earnestly to indorse and adopt these resolutions.

    4

    The following men were appointed to the committee by the assembly: A. C. Hessing, John G. Gindele, J. C. Kersten, L. Brentano, and Fred Letz.

    The following resolutions were adopted in a mass meeting which was held in Worker's Hall last evening: 1)Resolved, that a safety committee consisting of five members be appointed to aid ...

    German
    I D 1 a
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 31, 1861
    The Duty of the State Auditor (Editorial)

    As matters are now, only Chicago banks may use "wildcat money" which they buy from the people at miserably low prices to purchase notes of the State. If the State Auditor does his duty, and we hope that he will, this money-making scheme will cease to exist. The State Auditor should demand that the money barons of Chicago, who live in plenty and wallow in luxury, furnish security for the money deposited in their banks. If the bankers do this and make their currency notes as good as gold, well and good. If they do not, then the people should have the right to take these notes to Springfield and exchange them for State bonds. These securities sell at a much higher price than the poor people receive for "wildcat money."

    We have heard that the wildcat bankers of Chicago, whose notes are selling for 80 or 90 cents, have enlisted the aid of courthouse officers and other influential people in a frantic effort to have their financial institutions exempted 2from furnishing security. That would be an infamous swindle, since just these notes are used to defraud the laboring class of its money.

    These hypocritical bankers who but a few months ago were so patriotic as to demand that the people sign a document obligating themselves (the people) to use "wildcat money" as a medium of exchange during wartime, pretend to fear that the reputation of our State will suffer, if the New York money market is flooded with Illinois State debentures. Listen to the devil preach about the disastrous consequences of sin! People, who rob widows and orphans of their mite, are anxious about the credit of our State!

    These wildcat bankers had altogether too much influence at Springfield. They had complete control of the last legislature and did enough damage.

    Now the State Auditor should do his duty toward all of them without fear or favor.

    3

    He should demand that one and all purchase and sell their currency notes at a price which is at par with gold and silver, and if they do not do so, the people should be permitted to do what the bankers do--buy bonds in New York.

    We hope that the Auditor will treat these banks just as he does the others. It is his duty to put extreme pressure upon every bank that does not comply with the law.

    As matters are now, only Chicago banks may use "wildcat money" which they buy from the people at miserably low prices to purchase notes of the State. If the State ...

    German
    I D 1 a
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- July 01, 1861
    Schambeck's Company (Editorial)

    The Cincinnati Yolksfreund reports: "About six o'clock last evening Schambeck's Company arrived here from Chicago, via the Cincinnati and Chicago Air-Line Railroad, leaving the train at the Cincinnati, Hamilton and Dayton Railroad depot, Since the saddles and baggage of this stately cavalry contingent had been immediately transferred and sent on, the travellers were forced to lead their horses through the streets. Captain Schambeck had telegraphed to the local United States Quartermaster, requesting that official to make the necessary arrangements to care for the soldiers and their mounts. The Quartermaster ordered that the horses be taken to Benjamin Jennifer's Livery Stables, at the corner of 12th and Walnut Streets.

    There the horses were fed and bedded, but neither meals nor sleeping quarters were supplied for the men. Some goodhearted and patriotic citizens saw the 2men standing on street corners, heard their bitter complaints about the ill treatment of the Government, and took some of them to the Turnhalle, and others to nearby halls, where the tired troopers received meals and then were lodged in boarding houses. So local citizens had to care for United States soldiers, while it is the duty of the United States' Quartermaster to provide for them. This is just another example of the deplorable and harmful negligence and disorder which prevails in all branches of our war administration.

    Schambeck's Company consists of 102 members, all Chicago Germans who have seen service in the Old Country. They are strong, lanky men, and have all the necessary requisites to effective service in the cavalry of our army.

    The Cincinnati Yolksfreund reports: "About six o'clock last evening Schambeck's Company arrived here from Chicago, via the Cincinnati and Chicago Air-Line Railroad, leaving the train at the Cincinnati, Hamilton and ...

    German
    III D, I G, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- July 04, 1861
    Compromise (Editorial)

    It is possible that certain lukewarm men will express their desire for a compromise in the special session of Congress today, but we cannot believe that any such cowardly proposal will receive much serious consideration. On the contrary, we hope to hear requests that the administration cease its inactivity, that it proceed in Virginia, and carry on the war more energetically, until treason controls not an inch of ground in this Republic. The thought of suspending hostilities before the rebels have been dispersed and forced to obey, is so absurd that it would be an insult to the administration and to Congress to request them to consider it.

    When the loyal states took up arms, when they declared that they were willing to sacrifice thousands of their men and millions of dollars in money and property to preserve the Union, when they sent many of their 2sons to camps and battlefields and exhausted their economic resources for years to come, when the loyal states displayed this splendid evidence of patriotism, did they do so merely to hear contemptible speeches favoring a compromise or to achieve a worthless peace? Did they do so, perhaps, merely to come to a friendly agreement with the rebels, who even now are under arms at the portals of Washington in defiance of the Constitution? No, a thousand times no! The loyal states have made great sacrifices, and they always will, when it is necessary to defend the Union, the Constitution, liberty, justice, and honor, and to destroy the rebels who are trying to overthrow the Republic. That was, and is, the purpose for which the loyal states armed at great sacrifices, and a pillory is ready for anyone who dares to desecrate the heroic efforts and offerings of the loyal states and their citizens by compromising with the rebels.

    It is possible that certain lukewarm men will express their desire for a compromise in the special session of Congress today, but we cannot believe that any such cowardly proposal ...

    German
    I G
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- July 08, 1861
    The Policy to Be Followed by the Patriots of East Tennessee (Editorial)

    Elsewhere in this issue of the newspaper the reader will find information concerning the resolutions of the great Union Convention which the brave patriots of East Tennessee recently held at Greenville. This Convention, composed of staunch patriots from no fewer than thirty counties, was in session for three days. The proceedings were marked by harmony and the spirit of sacrifice. The declaration, made by the Convention and published in this newspaper, is characterized by great simplicity as well as an eloquent enumeration of the many crimes which the Secessionists and their ring leaders have committed against loyal citizens of the slave states. And what a contrast between this catalogue of heinous deeds and the description of the many benefits which the people of Tennessee also received at the hands of the 2Union, and which the loyal Tennesseans gratefully acknowledge!

    But do the resolutions contained in the declaration offer the correct solution of the problem confronting those citizens of the slave states who remained true to the Republic? As indicated by the resolutions, the people of East Tennessee want to sever their part of the state from the rest of Tennessee and establish themselves as a separate state. As we know, the patriots of West Virginia were the originators of the idea; at first they, too, intended to effect a complete separation from their state and to found another state. This plan would be effective if a complete and permanent separation between the North and the South were brought about, and a Southern confederation were permanently established; in that case it would be laudable only if those portions of the southern states which are favorably disposed toward the Union should leave the Rebels and join the Union. However, since there can be no doubt that the Federal Government will prevent a permanent separation between the North and the South, and will disperse the Southern Confederation, the matter assumes an entirely different aspect. The question is whether or not it would be more practical, 3if, under these circumstances, the loyal parts of the slave states remained with their respective states? We answer in the affirmative; for we believe that the whole of the slave states can be cleansed, purified, and emancipated by these loyal, true citizens, as soon as the disloyal parties in those states have been subdued by the strong arm of the Federal Government. Indeed, we are convinced that their co-operation will be indispensible in the cleansing process. Then, too, West Virginia and East Tennessee are to be looked upon as wedges which free labor has driven into the heart of slavery; for example, not even one tenth of the inhabitants of East Tennessee are slaves, while in the secession counties of West Tennessee, in the neighborhood of Memphis, the slaves are just as numerous as the whites. So if there are any serious intentions of abolishing slavery in the whole state of Tennessee, East Tennessee, which favors and furthers the cause of free labor, must not under any circumstances, be separated from West Tennessee, which is "slavocratic". Similar conditions prevail in most of the border states, especially in Virginia. It was for just this reason that the patriots of West Virginia abandoned their plan of establishing a separate state as soon as they saw that the United States' 4Government would not permit a disruption of the Union. They are now endeavoring to elect an administration which is loyal to the Republic in order to eliminate the influence of the disloyal elements within its borders. Let us hope that the forceful message of the President will induce the patriots of East Tennessee to take similar measures.

    In this connection we would like to call attention to the example of Switzerland. No canton was more loyal to the Swiss Republic than was Luzerne. And yet at one time Luzerne was a haven and stronghold of separatists. However, the canton was cleansed and purified by its loyal patriots who defeated the separatists at Gislikon and Meyers Kappel....

    Elsewhere in this issue of the newspaper the reader will find information concerning the resolutions of the great Union Convention which the brave patriots of East Tennessee recently held at ...

    German
    I J, I G
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- July 09, 1861
    Home Guard (Editorial)

    The President's message gives assurance that the War against the Southern Rebels will be carried on vigorously. A call for four hundred thousand men has been issued, and they will be enrolled by fall.

    However, war takes its toll of human lives, and soon the ranks of our brave Union soldiers will be thinned. Therefore, the training of a general reserve, or home guard is of the utmost importance. It is well known that the reserves of Missouri have already rendered excellent services.

    Everyone whose financial condition does not permit him to go to battle should endeavor to acquire at least some military training at home. And the home guard should be composed not only of married men and elderly men, but also of young unmarried men who have remained at home.

    2

    We know that every army needs reserves from time to time, and we are aware of how very important it is that the replacement troops have a knowledge of at least the rudiments of military tactics. This is a fact which needs no further proof or explanation. We shall very likely receive pertinent military orders soon, since Senator Wilson's proposal for the establishment of a general national guard is now before the senior legislative body.

    Here in Chicago it appeared that the citizens, particularly those of German extraction, were to begin training a reserve or home guard when hostilities began; several companies were organized, and we hoped that a number sufficient to establish a regiment would soon enroll. But the ardor quickly waned, and now only a small remnant of a formerly large body remains. Still it is gratifying that even a small group desires to continue its activity, and to obtain further military knowledge. Although a full company exists no more, on the West Side a comparatively large part of Company Three still drills very diligently and conscientiously; and though Company One, on the North Side, was reduced from one hundred ten to about half that number, the Company will 3undoubtedly compensate, with increased efficiency for what it lost in numerical strength.

    Thus we see that many men take training seriously--in addition to exercising two evenings a week, they answer the call of the drum every Sunday, and it is only fair to say that they make good use of the little time that is at their disposal.

    Captain Eshenburg, an officer who received a thorough education at a Prussian military school, deserves credit for the splendid progress made by Company One. He has succeeded in instilling a liking for military matters in his men, as each and every one of them will testify. They presented him with a sword, July 4, in recognition of his honest and conscientious efforts. Mr. E. Pruessing, Second Officer of the Company, made the presentation and addressed a few well chosen words to the leader. The spirit of this Company and the fine relation existing between the men and their officers is highly pleasing, indeed.

    Finally, we most urgently request that all German men of Chicago who do not 4intend to or cannot enlist in the fighting forces immediately, join the reserves, at least, and devote a few hours of every week to military training. Men who live on the North Side may report at the headquarters of Company One in the German House, and residents of the West Side at West Market Hall.

    The President's message gives assurance that the War against the Southern Rebels will be carried on vigorously. A call for four hundred thousand men has been issued, and they will ...

    German
    I G, III D, I J, IV