The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Rassviet (The Dawn) -- January 02, 1935
    Fourteen Additional Victims (Editorial)

    Last Saturday the bolshevik executioners killed fourteen more men. This time the bolsheviks did not kill White Guards [Translator's note: Partisans of the old regime], but their own comrades from the party, L. Nikolae and thirteen other bolsheviks from the opposition group. The Soviet papers publish official statements to the effect that Kirov's assassination was organized by communists--followers of Zinoviev and Kamenev. These conspirators were brought before a military court and sentenced to death by shooting. Their case, just as the cases of the first victims of bolshevik terror, was carried through in an inquisitional manner, behind closed doors, with no defense or mercy plea permitted. As a result the conspirators were executed immediately following the pronouncement of sentence.

    As far as the ringleaders--Zinoviev and Kamenev--are concerned, they, as was 2to be expected, were not even brought before the court. According to reports from Warsaw, they were banished to Solovki[Translator's Note: island concentration camp in the White Sea].

    According to European newspapers, Stalin's leniency toward Zinoviev and Kamenev was dictated by Stalin's fear of shooting them, as was the case with Trotsky, for their execution might threaten the dictator's regime with serious consequences. Some of the European newspapers compare the current bolshevik terror to Hitler's purge of last year, when some of the prominent National Socialists were shot down. But it's impossible to compare these bloody events. Stalin's terror is many times worse than Hitler's terror. Hitler tried to eliminate only those of his comrades who sought to gain the upper hand in authority, and never touched innocent people. Stalin, on the contrary, began his purge with the mass destruction of the Russian people who had not had any part in Kirov's murder. Why did bolsheviks 3kill one hundred and three men in Petrograd, Moscow, Minsk and Kiev? Nobody knows the reason, perhaps not even the red executioners themselves.

    It's true that the bolshevik press tried to implicate the victims in the terrorist plot, and the plans for a revolutionary coup d'etat, but this accusation cannot be justified in any way. Only idiots would think that preparations for a crime and its execution are the same thing.

    If preparations for revolution are a crime, deserving capital punishment, then, on this basis, all the communists in the capitalist countries, in so far as they participate in preparations for revolutionary coup d'etats and seizure of authority, should be punished by death.

    Therefore, we are compelled to think that the bolsheviks killed one hundred and three men merely to intimidate the Russian people, merely to ensure their submission to slavery and hunger, so that they would not dare to fight the 4bolshevik parasites and oppressors.

    If the bolsheviks destroyed one another as mad dogs do, perhaps it would not be bad at all. When, for instance, bandits of Chicago or New York destroy one another, it does not sadden or make anybody indignant. But when they attack innocent people, the population declares war against them. At present there is a war going on in Russia between two sets of political bandits--between Stalinists and various bolshevik opposition groups. However, innocent people suffer more from this war than do the bandits. Herein lies the tragic part of the latest events in Russia.

    Last Saturday the bolshevik executioners killed fourteen more men. This time the bolsheviks did not kill White Guards [Translator's note: Partisans of the old regime], but their own comrades from ...

    Russian
    I E, III H
  • Rassviet (The Dawn) -- January 03, 1935
    It's Impossible to Be Silent by Zvonarev

    A band of bandits, under the mask of benefactors of humanity, seized power in Russia in 1917 and began to outrage all the Russian people. They seized authority by the use of deceit and violence, and retain it by the same means.

    Kirov's assassination cannot be considered a casual affair. On the contrary, on close examination of the whole incident, it becomes clear that his murder was premeditated. Trotsky's followers could not possibly discontinue their struggle for seizure of the supreme authority after Lenin's death. The followers of Trotsky deceived Lenin's followers by false promises and disclaimers in order to get an opportunity to revenge themselves upon their enemies. They are just as treacherous, and as set on revenge as Stalin's followers. By Kirov's assassination, they frightened Stalin to such a degree that this tyrant is ready to jump out of his own hide. Consequently, he puts to death not only 2the guilty ones, but their kin as well--women and children. Stalin's GPU put to death everyone whose name was blacklisted. They did it because they consider as guilty not only the persons involved in the plot, but innocent individuals as well; thus they can intimidate others, otherwise the band of bandits might be threatened with serious trouble. By such means, they attempt to continue to hold the whole Russian people in slavery. The heart of Russia shrinks at every blow of the Bolshevik tyranny, although those who killed Kirov have not even been touched.

    But how about Mr. Schkliar and his band of sycophants; he discusses this event in his seditious Novy; Mir [Translator's note: name of Bolshevik newspaper in New York]. He rages, and claims that Kirov's murderers crossed the boundaries of Russia from Latvia and Poland, and organized the terrorist acts against the Soviet government. All of them, according to Mr. Schkliar, are supporters of the czarist regime. He also rages against all class-conscious workers, against all members of ROOV, RNzOV and the newspaper Rassviet. He accuses all class-conscious workers [of complicity], in Kirov's assassination.

    3

    These traders in human souls call mass meetings in order to instigate peasants' sons against class-conscious workers and against their mothers and fathers who still live across the ocean. Typical speculators, under the mask of people's friends, they deny every evidence of the suffering endured by the Russian people, They try to comfort illiterate individuals by claiming that the hardships and sufferings of the Russian people are not at all serious.

    The Russian people, hungry and deprived of all rights, have not even the right to tell the rest of the world about their own misfortune, and to ask for help and protection. We, residents of the United States, are, however, very well aware of the blood-curdling tragedy that is being perpetrated on the Russian people. We hear their groans.

    Therefore, enough of silence! We should all unite, arrange mass meetings and proclaim to the entire world: the Russian people have suffered enough! We 4should tell the Bolshevik traders: stop degrading our peasant name and spitting on justice. I call on all peasant sons in Detroit, Philadelphia, Boston, Baltimore, Chicago, and other cities: enough of silence. We must raise our voices, as one man, in protest against the Bolshevik murderers, in defense of our brothers in Russia.

    A band of bandits, under the mask of benefactors of humanity, seized power in Russia in 1917 and began to outrage all the Russian people. They seized authority by the ...

    Russian
    I E, III H
  • Saloniki-Greek Press -- January 03, 1935
    New Store

    The new grocery store "Moreas" was opened last Monday at 412 South Halsted Street, about four doors north of the elevated station. This store is owned and managed by the well-known, experienced Angelo Tsiolis, who has owned the store at Cicero Avenue and Madison Street for many years.

    The new grocery store "Moreas" was opened last Monday at 412 South Halsted Street, about four doors north of the elevated station. This store is owned and managed by the ...

    Greek
    II A 2
  • Saloniki-Greek Press -- January 03, 1935
    School Benefit Dance

    The benefit dance, given last Sunday at the West End Woman's Club for the purpose of raising money to help the Socrates Greek-American School to continue to function, was a tremendous success. All the available space was filled to overflowing by people who recognized the value of the work done by this Greek School.

    Dancing was continuous, including the popular Greek dances. The entire Board of Trustees of the Holy Trinity Church was active in its endeavor to see that every one had a good time. Despite the fact that many of the younger people present were American born, the spirit of the evening was purely Hellenic.

    The benefit dance, given last Sunday at the West End Woman's Club for the purpose of raising money to help the Socrates Greek-American School to continue to function, was a ...

    Greek
    II B 2 f, II D 10
  • Saloniki-Greek Press -- January 03, 1935
    Open Letter to All the Greek Maidens of Chicago

    In behalf of the Greek movie company known as the Cosmograph Hellenic Films Company, which has just brought the movie entitled, "This is Life" to Chicago,....I desire to invite all of you to take part in the beauty contest we are sponsoring. On the committee chosen as judges will be members of Ladies' clubs, scholars, professional men and women, and American art critics. The judging will be done in the aristocratic Aragon Ballroom, February 18.

    The plan and hope of the Cosmograph Hellenic Films is to choose for the first time the three loveliest--in face and body--Greek girls. Beside that, we hope to encourage all Greek girls to be proud of their lineage by making them aware that the people to which they belong is one famous for its 2lovely women.....

    The contestants will parade in front of the judges and the assembled family groups in evening dress. The three winners will be rewarded with rich and queenly gifts. The nine girls chosen as ladies-in-waiting to the queen will also receive lovely gifts.

    Most important of all, the first three contestants will be assigned parts in the films, the work on which we hope will soon be started in our Chicago studios. We hope to establish successful Greek movies in Chicago, using Greek beauties as stars.

    Should you decide to enter this dignified beauty contest, please communicate at once with our headquarters at 110 South Dearborn Street, Suite 905....

    3

    Someone from the Ladies' Committee will always be on hand to accept your name and picture.

    Respectfully,

    Cosmograph Hellenic Films,

    Nicholas A. Christy.

    In behalf of the Greek movie company known as the Cosmograph Hellenic Films Company, which has just brought the movie entitled, "This is Life" to Chicago,....I desire to invite all ...

    Greek
    II B 2 e
  • [Interview] -- January 04, 1935
    Interview: with Dr. A. I. Nedzelnitsky (Nedzel), 1608 Milwaukee Avenue, Chicago, Ill.

    Dr. Nedzel was born in the large village Lubomirka, in the province of Kherson (Ukraine), in 1888. He received his education partly in St. Petersburg, where he studied at the Voznesenskaya High School. But he was not graduated from this school, as in 1905, being involved in political troubles which stirred up all the Russian young people, he was discharged from the school together with several of his fellow students. Being eager to complete his education, he went abroad, to Germany, and in Dresden joined the Polytechnikum, where he studied two years. He then returned to Russia, to Odessa, passed his high school examinations and joined the Novorossiysky University in Odessa, where he studied medicine. He graduated in 1913 and, as one of the most proficient students, was allowed to remain connected with the university in order to go on with his studies, preparing himself for professorship.

    2

    However, the World War interfered with his studies. In 1913 he had to join the army and since the beginning of the war in 1914 till 1918, the doctor worked as a military surgeon. Then he returned to Odessa and continued his research studies at the university.

    In 1920 Dr. Nedzel was obliged to leave Russia and to go to Constantinople as a refugee. Here he soon found a congenial occupation: he managed the laboratories of the Russian hospital of St. Nicholas and of the American hospital.

    In 1923 Dr. Nedzel left Constantinople and sailed to America. He came to Chicago and since 1924 has been a practicing physician and surgeon in this city.

    Since 1929 Dr. Nedzel has been a member of the faculty of the University 3of Illinois, College of Medicine. He is associate professor of pathology and bacteriology. He is chiefly occupied with research in the realm of localization of diseases. He has made many valuable learned investigations in this realm. Reports of these investigations have been published in the pages of several scientific reviews.

    Dr. Nedzel is a fellow of the American Medical Association; a member of the Illinois State Medical Society; also of the Chicago Medical Society, of the Pathological Society, of the society of Experimental Biology and Medicine, of the Medical Research Club and of Sigma Xi. He is very popular among the Russians of Chicago as a practicing physician and surgeon, and has also many patients of other nationalities, especially among Poles, Ukrainians and Galicians.

    Besides his activities as a scientist and practicing physician, Dr. Nedzel has always been an active social worker amongthe Russians in Chicago.

    4

    Every years he has been giving a number of lectures on medical subjects, especially in the years 1924 and 1925, when the club Prosvyeshcheniye (Enlightenment) was in existence. For a number of years he has been a member of the examining commissions of several Russian schools. He provided Rassviet periodically with a medical column from 1926 to 1929, and again since 1935 to the present time.

    He is Supreme Physician of the Russian Independent Mutual Aid Society, Medical Examiner of the St. Nicholas Brotherhood, connected with the Holy Trinity Cathedral, and a member of the Russian American Citizens' Organization. He was president of the Pushkin Committee till September 1936.

    Dr. Nedzel was born in the large village Lubomirka, in the province of Kherson (Ukraine), in 1888. He received his education partly in St. Petersburg, where he studied at the ...

    Russian
    IV, II B 2 f, II B 2 c
  • Rassviet (The Dawn) -- January 04, 1935
    During the New Year by N. Komiakov

    The old year has gone. A new year is here. Time moves on, and we, the living, move onward, together with time. Our movement is determined by the direction in which we are going, and our goal. Striving to get ahead is, in itself, movement--movement toward something new. To strive for something new means that we are not satisfied with the old. In our social work, which has been based on mutual aid and the improvement of the welfare of our organization, its membership as a whole, and each of us individually, all efforts should be directed toward the goal of finishing the unfinished work, and achieving the desired goals during this year--for the improvement of our organization and for the benefit of each one of us individually. We have joined an organization for the sole purpose of helping one another, and by our joint efforts, of carrying out beneficial work in the interests of us all.

    2

    During the last year we were not asleep despite the baneful influence of the depression, for we have started new and important enterprises. One such undertaking is the purchase of the communal farm. Another is the publication of our official magazine, The Herald. If the first enterprise is purely of a practical nature, in the economic interests of our members--so that they can enjoy their rest during the vacation periods--then the second--the publication of the magazine Herald--is a step toward satisfying and enriching our spiritual well-being. By means of our periodical, we shall be able to increase the mutual understanding among our members concerning all the problems which are constantly posed by[the realities of] life. With the help of the periodical, we shall know better where to go and what to do in order that each of us personally and collectively, united in organizations, can prosper and develop.

    Our energies must not remain dormant this year, particularly in the sphere of our civic endeavor. To stop half-way for us is impossible because it would mean that we had lost courage, and that we had neither the strength 3nor the desire to go forward. We have not yet finished all the improvements we plan to make on our farm. This should be done this year, whatever the cost may be. For this purpose, each one of us who has not contributed his share, must do it now because it is a communal effort for the benefit of us all. The beginning of the new year is important for us because it forces us to take a look backward, and to think of the future--to consider what was done and what is to be done. But in order to accomplish anything, we must act and we must be practical. We issue a call to action and joint effort in this editorial addressed to all members of Roova[Russian Consolidated Mutual Aid Society].

    The old year has gone. A new year is here. Time moves on, and we, the living, move onward, together with time. Our movement is determined by the direction in ...

    Russian
    II D 1, I L, II B 2 d 2
  • Danish Times -- January 04, 1935
    Christmas Tree for Five Hundred Children

    Over five hundred Danish children attended the colony's Christmas festival. The best entertainment that could be had was enjoyed by all. This is the largest children's festival ever held here. The program consisted of the usual Fairies and a Jule Nisse (Santa Claus).

    Over five hundred Danish children attended the colony's Christmas festival. The best entertainment that could be had was enjoyed by all. This is the largest children's festival ever held here. ...

    Danish
    III B 3 b
  • Osadne Hlasy -- January 04, 1935
    Medical Care for the Poor

    Many of our people who receive relief either from the state or county are unaware that free medical attention is now available. Under the present arrangements a person who is ill and receiving aid, either from the Unemployment Relief Service, the Cook County Bureau of Public Welfare, the Veteran's Service, or from the Catholic Diocesan Welfare Society, may get free medical aid, if necessary, and in most cases the clients can get the services of their own family physician. The doctors are getting a good deal less money for their services, but they are constantly on the job and always willing to do their part in relieving human misery and want. There are a number of our own Slovak doctors available and if they help others, they surely will help us.

    Many of our people who receive relief either from the state or county are unaware that free medical attention is now available. Under the present arrangements a person who is ...

    Slovak
    II D 3
  • Rassviet (The Dawn) -- January 05, 1935
    The Russian Women

    The beginning of a new year will probably stimulate the activities of the Russian organizations in Chicago. I have come to this conclusion as a result of private conversations, as well as those overheard at social gatherings. It would be very nice if my expectations came true, since the results would be very beneficial to the Russian organizations in Chicago. Even now there are a great number of men and women in Chicago who do not belong to any organization. This is particularly true of women.

    In America, at present, women occupy a very important place in the political life of the country. Many women are elected to important political posts. They also play quite an important role in the economic life of the country, as well as in the field of education. As far as the Russian women in Chicago are concerned, they are not at all interested in such problems. They prefer to kill their time with trivialities, with gossip, instead of devoting their 2time to something more useful. All nationalities have large women's organizations. Polish women are particularly well organized. Each mother who belongs to an organization, sees to it that her children belong too. For that reason Polish mutual aid organizations develop very rapidly and prosper financially.

    In order to quicken the tempo of life of the Russians in Chicago, and to make this life more cultured more interesting, the Russian women in Chicago should create their own exclusive branches in conjunction with the society Rnzov. Let the New Year establish the beginning of the activity of Russian women in Chicago for the benefit and enlightenment of the entire membership of the glorious Independent [Mutual Aid]Society.

    The beginning of a new year will probably stimulate the activities of the Russian organizations in Chicago. I have come to this conclusion as a result of private conversations, as ...

    Russian
    I K, I C, II D 1