The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

Filter by Date

  • Abendpost -- January 01, 1933
    A Well-Known Musical Director

    Our old home has given quite a number of well known musicians to our adopted country, among them, the musical director Joseph Koestner, who to many friends of radio music has not been a stranger. Maybe not quite as well known as Walter Damrosch, whom even the schoolchildren of this country know well by his name and his language, because they heard him many times when he made his pleasant musical explanations during the children's hour. They also know him by his pictures. A picture of him shown sitting at the piano, appeared lately in this paper.

    Today another music master should be remembered: Joseph Koestner, who as a very small boy liked to tinkle on his father's piano.

    This piano stood in Willersdorf, where little Joseph was born and received his first musical education. His was a musical family: father Koestner was a music teacher and organist; the mother a virtuoso on the zither, and 2the uncle no less than Felix Mottle whom everybody knew in Munich, if he ever passed the State Opera house.

    At the age of four years little Joseph received his first instructions on the piano from his father, at the age of six, he was the proud possessor of his first violin. Then came twelve years of serious studies at the Leipsic Conservatory, a hard time for the young artist, because after the death of his father, he had to help support his family. Later he became acquainted with Otto Lohse. This brought to him welcome opportunity to get a knowledge of the operatic department. Further he became acquainted with our Frederic Stock, through whom Koestner, who in the meantime had become a well-known virtuoso, got in touch with Claire Dix, that world renowned singer, who engaged him to be her piano accompanist on her concert tours. Still later he was engaged as concert master for the Balaban & Katz theatres. Soon he became the National Broadcasting Company Orchestra's musical director. He is one of those on whom the Germans can look with pride as on a man who has made a name for himself in the musical world.

    Our old home has given quite a number of well known musicians to our adopted country, among them, the musical director Joseph Koestner, who to many friends of radio music ...

    German
    II A 3 b, II B 2 e
  • Rassviet (The Dawn) -- January 03, 1933
    Christmas Celebration for Russian Children

    Note about a Christmas celebration with Christmas tree for Russian children, to take place on January 8th, 1933, at Polish Union Hall, 984 Milwaukee Ave. A concert program and dancing and other entertainments are announced.

    Note about a Christmas celebration with Christmas tree for Russian children, to take place on January 8th, 1933, at Polish Union Hall, 984 Milwaukee Ave. A concert program and dancing ...

    Russian
    III C
  • Rassviet (The Dawn) -- January 03, 1933
    Christmas Celebration for Russian Children

    Notice about a Christmas celebration with Christmas tree for Russian children to take place on January 8, 1933, at Polish Union Hall, 984 Milwaukee Avenue. A concert program and dancing and other entertainments are announced.

    Notice about a Christmas celebration with Christmas tree for Russian children to take place on January 8, 1933, at Polish Union Hall, 984 Milwaukee Avenue. A concert program and dancing ...

    Russian
    III C
  • Saloniki-Greek Press -- January 05, 1933
    Our Community Problem Is the People's Problem (Editorial)

    After the struggle carried on by this newspaper for the rectification of our community affairs and the clarification of the situation, innumerable letters are arriving in our office, which on the whole express intense pain at the present intolerable conditions. We accept the verdict of public opinion, which emphasizes the need for a systematic study of our problems.

    Each time that we have dealt with our community affairs--and we have done so many times, without any pompous titles--we have always supported the opinion that the public demands an immediate and radical reorganization, but that it lacks the necessary power to enforce its will. This is up to the church governing boards and our higher Greek church authorities.

    The problems which the Greek people of Chicago must face this year are infinitely 2more important than those which occupied its attention in the past. These problems cannot remain unsolved for long, if we want to preserve our identity as a national Greek group. The state of affairs has reached a point where only those who have no social experience or historical perspective think that our problems will solve themselves. This psychological condition which characterizes many of our community leaders is nothing more than mental and spiritual inertia and shiftlessness, the result of ignorance of the elementary conditions necessary for a community. The prevailing opinion that things must take their natural course, is characteristic of men who are devoid of any ideals. These men are living only in the present, without being able to see into the future. A policy of aloofness and indifference, on the other hand, leads to social disintegration. We want to believe that the entire group of our people in Chicago has not become the victim of a sort of mental lethargy and sterility to the extent that it is no longer interested in the fate of our community structure.

    We realize that no form of organization is ever perfect; that no scheme which 3has been tried has produced the expected results. But, there is no instance in history where conditions changed and states took a different social, economic, or political direction, when the people did not strive for the best. Only the Greek people of Chicago are negative in their attitude, indecisive, and inert. Our leaders do not seem to be aware of the historical axiom which asserts that a static and self-complacent state is nonexistent. We either progress or retrogress. In the eyes of even the most naive, the Greek community of Chicago is retrogressing.

    It is indeed strange to see that logical and practical men think that the narrow confines of their particular parish embrace the entire world of social ideas and values. The voice which we are now raising reflects society's demands to adjust our affairs on the basis of the common interest. We shall continue to maintain that the principle of a consolidated and united Greek community in Chicago constitutes the key to the solution of all our pressing problems. Our leaders and people must think and act like intelligent and prudent members of a consolidated Greek community. Mere academic discussions do not inspire action.

    4

    We will ask for the support of the Greek Archdiocese in New York--and it will be given us--for the regulation of our affairs.

    Why lose time? In his last visit to us, His Grace the Archbishop expressed the hope for a united community. He instructed us to form a deliberative body which shall elect a committee to study and report on the possibility and the means of a more unified reorganization of our community institutions and forces. The report will be made before the governing boards of each and every Greek church of Chicago. The Archbishop reserves the right to appoint members to the committee. We are lodging a strong protest against this prerogative of the Archbishop. This undue interference of his will not help the matter. This is a matter which the people themselves should tackle; we suggest, therefore, that the governing boards of our churches convene immediately to decide on the composition and methods of the committee.

    After the struggle carried on by this newspaper for the rectification of our community affairs and the clarification of the situation, innumerable letters are arriving in our office, which on ...

    Greek
    III A, III C
  • Osadne Hlasy -- January 06, 1933
    Slovaks Resigned from the World's Fair Committee A Declaration to the Patriotic Slovaks in America

    Dear Slovak Friends;

    A World's Fair will be held in 1933, in the City of Chicago. It will be a World's Progress Exposition. All the nationalities are making preparations to display their cultural achievements to the world.

    The Slovaks of Chicago, had taken great interest in this undertaking and wished to participate in the Century of Progress Exposition. Therefore, at a mass meeting of the Chicago Slovaks, held on Nov. 29, 1931, there was organized a Slovak World's Fair Committee, for the purpose of uniting all the Slovaks in America, with the idea of making a united appearance before the world. This was denied to them by the World's Fair executive committee. The Slovaks, then, in order to show their strength and might

    2

    to the public, chose another committee, which consisted of representatives from all the large Slovak organizations.

    The Slovaks were to unite with the Bohemians, not as Czechoslovaks-as the Boehemians wished it-but on the same basis as their brothers, the Czechs. The following Slovaks were on the committee: Mr. Samuel Kostelny, Dr. P. Hletko, Mr. Adam Poliak, Mr. Michael Rehak, Mr. V. S. Platek, Elizabeth Lavrinec, Julia Kraycovic, Catherine Bohus, Mary Sopocy, Mr. Martin Potucek, Mr. M. Palkovic, Mr. Hermina Vlk, Mr. Joseph Simonides, Anne Simek, Mr. Joseph Spanik, Mr. John Filko, Reverend Mlinarovic, Mr. Rondzik, Mr. Bradec and Reverand Pelikan.

    The Slovak Committee united with the Bohemians, and formed a Czecho-Slovak

    3

    Committee, in which the Slocaks were to receive equal rights and privileges as their brothers, the Czechs, and share equally all the expenses.

    The by-laws for the committee were made about a year ago. According to them, the committee was to be called, The Czecho-Slovak Branch of the World's Fair Committee, Century of Progress in Chicago, 1933.

    From the year 1931, the cooperative work of the Czechs and Slovaks was gradually developing, and a satisfactory understanding was reached. But a month ago, arguments and disagreements took place concerning the incorporation of the Czecho-Slovak Committee. The Czechs were in favor of incorporating the committee as Czechoslovak, that is, without a hyphen. For the first time they revealed their intentions to the Slovaks by using

    4

    the name in the Worlds Fair, without a hyphen. The Slovaks adhering to the by-laws, wanted to know why they could not appear as Czechs and Slovaks, as two separate nations represented by one Czecho-Slovak committee? An argument developed between the Czechs and the Slovaks.The Czechs claimed that it made no difference as to whether the committee were known as Czechoslovak or Czecho-Slovak, because they both meant the same thing. The Slovaks, however, had a different opinion in the matter. They mentioned the fact that when the contract was signed between both nationalities, the committee was called Czecho-Slovak. Our brothers the Czechs stated that we should appear before the public as a Czechoslovakian nation and apply the hyphen only in the Slovak and Bohemian connection. After the statement had been made, we, the undersigned Slovaks, resigned from the committee because we realized that the situation, in the future would not be a smooth one.

    5

    We as Slovaks, faithful to our nation, could not appear before the American public as Czechoslovaks. Also we could not justly proclaim the identity of the Czecho-Slovak nation. If we were not allowed to declare at the World's Fair that we are Slovaks, we would be misrepresented.

    We were willing to cooperate with out Czech brothers on a basis of equality, and we are still willing to do so. But only on the condition, that we will be recognized and accepted as a Slovak nation. We are only defending the interests of the Slovak people. The patriotic Slovaks will approve our reason for resigning from the committee. We regret that we had to take this step, but if we wish to stand up for our rights, we must do so, regardless of the price it may entail.

    6

    Signed: Adam Poliak, Elizabeth Lavrinec, John Filko, Michael Rehak, Julia Krajcovic, Dr. Peter Hletko, Anne Simek, Hermina Vlk, M. Palkovic.

    Chicago, Illinois, December 31, 1932

    Dear Slovak Friends; A World's Fair will be held in 1933, in the City of Chicago. It will be a World's Progress Exposition. All the nationalities are making preparations to ...

    Slovak
    II B 1 c 3, I C, III B 2
  • Osadne Hlasy -- January 06, 1933
    This and That

    The Slovaks who resigned from the Czecho-Slovak World's Fair Committee, because the Bohemians did not want to hyphenate the name Czecho-Slovak, are constantly being reproached for desiring to import a European political battle to America. In the Committee such things have no place. Let us look at this matter honestly.

    The Slovaks, regardless of European politics or its situations, had the right to request a hyphen in the name Czecho-Slovak World's Fair Committee, because the committee represented American citizens of Slovak and Bohemian descent. The Bohemians had a ready answer for the Slovaks by referring to the official name of the Czecho-Slovak Republic. The name is seldom

    2

    hyphenated except by the Slovaks. Who then, started the discussion of European politics? One thing was certain, that, American Slovaks clearly revealed to the Bohemians, in this city, that they are not compelled to subordinate themselves, and that the Bohemians must deal with the Slovaks as their equal brothers. This step, which the Slovaks had taken, brought respect and recognition from some of the Bohemians and also from other nationalities.

    The Slovaks who resigned from the Czecho-Slovak World's Fair Committee, because the Bohemians did not want to hyphenate the name Czecho-Slovak, are constantly being reproached for desiring to import a ...

    Slovak
    II B 1 c 3, I C, III B 2
  • Magyar Tribune -- January 06, 1933
    [Twentieth Year] (Editorial)

    Today, on the front page of our newspaper and below the title, there appears the caption, "Twentieth year," which means that during the last nineteen years we have served with unselfish perseverance the Hungarians of Chicago and vicinity. Like a faithful soldier, the Magyar Tribune has stood watch through nineteen years over the Hungarian interests, so that nobody and nothing could hurt them. For nineteen years we have been preaching with unyielding consistency liberal and, in some measure, even radical ideas, in which we see the only way to a happier future.

    All this we have done only through our own work, with great sacrifices on our part, especially during the recent years of depression. We fought against all obstacles, because the Magyar Tribune is not solely a business enterprise but also a Hungarian institution, which, in fulfilling its calling, does not shrink back from making any sacrifices in order to promote the interests of the 2Hungarians.

    In this struggle of ours, our only support has been the mighty legion of our readers, which is warmly faithful to us, and is together with us in our struggle. Our enthusiastic readers give us the strength to continue our fight. They know and feel that ours is not a battle for individual gain but a battle for human rights and to build up a better future.

    Now at the beginning of the New Year, we ask our readers to keep us in their affection and to strengthen us by renewing their subscriptions, so that we may further serve the interests of the Hungarian-Americans.

    In return we pledge ourselves to be in the future what we were in the past: the determined fighters for the interests of the Hungarians and the torch-bearers of progressive ideas.

    Today, on the front page of our newspaper and below the title, there appears the caption, "Twentieth year," which means that during the last nineteen years we have served with ...

    Hungarian
    II B 2 d 1
  • Rassviet (The Dawn) -- January 06, 1933
    Lectures by Mr. G. D. Grebenshchikov

    Announcement of two lectures to be given by the well known Russian writer G. D. Grebenshchikov, to be given on January 9 and 10, 1933. The themes are "The Truth, Sacrifice and Hope of the Russian People," and "Holy and Rejected Russia." The lectures will be illustrated by screen pictures.

    Note: From an article by Mr. I. Raskatov, Rassviet, Jan. 19, 1933, containing an account and criticism of the first lecture we learn that Mr. Grebenshchikov dwelt exclusively on the bright side of the tsaristic regime in Russia, ignoring entirely its dark side, showing thus an entire lack of understanding of the causes of the Russian revolution. D. S.)

    Announcement of two lectures to be given by the well known Russian writer G. D. Grebenshchikov, to be given on January 9 and 10, 1933. The themes are "The Truth, ...

    Russian
    III H, I E
  • Osadne Hlasy -- January 06, 1933
    An Announcement to Citizens of the Twenty-First Ward

    All the members of the Slovak Citizen's Club in the twenty-first Ward are asked to be present at a meeting, January 6, at 7:30 o'clock. It will be held in the C. S. P. S. hall, 1126 West Eighteenth Street.

    Now, fellow citizens, is the time to show our determination to elevate ourselves and the Slovak name during the year 1933. We cannot wait for wonders to happen, nor must we depend on the help of others. We must work in every possible way to reach the goal and make our dreams a reality. Therefore, citizens of the twenty-first Ward, we appeal to you for your assistance and co-operation. We hope that you will be present at this meeting, because many important matters will be discussed. Membership cards will be distributed at the meeting. All those who wish to receive their cards are asked to be present.

    All the members of the Slovak Citizen's Club in the twenty-first Ward are asked to be present at a meeting, January 6, at 7:30 o'clock. It will be held in ...

    Slovak
    I F 2, I F 1
  • Osadne Hlasy -- January 06, 1933
    Slovak Selected for a Public Office

    Many of our Slovak people and newspapers were in doubt about the work of the American-Slovak Citizen's League. We can now assure the public that the League is doing everything possible in order that the Slovaks receive the recognition due them. We are permitted to announce only this information to the Slovak public. The long-awaited recognition by political leaders is becoming an actuality. Just recently, with the assistance of the League, and the co-operation of the Czecho-Slovak Citizen's Club in Mayfair and Jefferson Park, and also with the help of Mr. S. Kruto, and Mr. T. Bowlers, who is president of the Sanitary district, Mr. Samuel Papanek, a young Slovak lawyer, was selected as an assistant to the State Chairman. Mr. Papanek is already functioning in his new position.

    We hope that in the near future we will be able to make more announcements of a similar nature.

    Many of our Slovak people and newspapers were in doubt about the work of the American-Slovak Citizen's League. We can now assure the public that the League is doing everything ...

    Slovak
    I F 4, I F 2