The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Saloniki-Greek Press -- January 01, 1931
    First Dance Given by the Greek-American Young Girls Chapter of "Kypseli" Order of Gapa (Greek American Progressive Association)

    p. 4.- The Greek-American young girls of the Chapter "Kypseli" Order of Gapa, are working with great zeal for the successful outcome of their first dance next Sunday, Jan. 18th, in the Cameo Room of the Morrison Hotel. The program will be rich. Among the special numbers will be Constant Nichols, star classical dancer in the immortal play, "Lyssistrata" of Aristophanes, now playing in Chicago.

    Mr. Nichols will dance before general dancing starts and show the audience his exceptional talent. We are sure everybody will have a good time supporting a worthy cause. I will meet you there.

    p. 4.- The Greek-American young girls of the Chapter "Kypseli" Order of Gapa, are working with great zeal for the successful outcome of their first dance next Sunday, Jan. 18th, ...

    Greek
    III B 2
  • The Weekly Zgoda -- January 01, 1931
    Let Us Send the Youth to Motherland (Editorial)

    Cut off from the maternal stem and placed by circumstances in this adopted country, we always are longing for the land of our birth where we spent the years of our youth. Even though these years might not have been very happy for some, yet they always recall to their memory whatever there was pleasant in their early experience of life.

    Our longing for Poland is the stronger now since Poland is free and independent, because we want to see with own eyes how the new Poland looks, and how the new people are managing their affairs there.

    2

    Not all are equally favored with means to visit Poland and stay there for a suitable period of time; but those less privileged could at least send their children to Poland in order that they might see the new Poland with her riches in wisdom and culture; and for that purpose there is being arranged by the Polish National Alliance an excursion to Poland next year, in the month of June, and it will be so inexpensive that even the less wealthy parents can afford to avail themselves of that opportunity, By sending your children to Poland you will share in strengthening in them the Polish spirit and in making them better prepared in the future to take up our places and duties in Polish organizations, to be champions of everything that is Polish.

    Other nations do likewise. The writer of this article will recall that before the great war both the more and the less wealthy German families 3were sending their children to Germany with the explicit purpose that they would be eye witnesses to all that their fatherland possesses and enjoys.

    So have the French inhabitants done also in this country, by organizing and expediting to France a great excursion for their children under the guardianship of the elders. That was some years before the great war, and by now the French newspapers in Paris are appealing to the French residents in this country that they send their sons and daughters to France. This, they say, should be done in order that by visiting France and by sojourning there for some time the children would become imbued with French spirit. Greatness and culture, would preserve these impressions after coming back to this country.

    4

    It is for a like purpose that the Educational Department of the Polish National Alliance is preparing a similar excursion to Poland, details of which will be presented in a special announcement to be published soon.

    Cut off from the maternal stem and placed by circumstances in this adopted country, we always are longing for the land of our birth where we spent the years of ...

    Polish
    III H, III A, III B 2
  • Saloniki-Greek Press -- January 01, 1931
    The Student's Dance

    p. 1.- Thousands of Greeks were present at the Stevens Hotel. The young Greek Student's Brotherhood, Delta Epsilon Pi, of the University of Illinois, gave its second annual dance there last Sunday. At their dance this year, the Greek students showed once more a Greek-like gathering comparable to the previous one. The whole atmosphere indicated that the only hope we have of preserving our racial spirit in the United States is by following higher studies.

    One of the most important rules of that night among the students was that, in their speeches and conversation, no language was spoken but Greek. The students dance was entirely one bright showing of the younger generation. One thing worth mentioning is, that the fourteen Greek students of the University of Illinois formed an ideal group, a group with an objective.

    During their terms at the University, members of the group room and board together, think together, study together, work together, play and speak the language of their forefathers.

    2

    Studying this systematic and mutual cooperation, one should conceive the importance of moral profit in throwing more young Greeks among the students. The fact along that young Greek students live and study under one roof is praiseworthy. Their ambition and intention is to erect their own building so the University's students of coming generations may be housed together.

    Judging them by the excellent behavior and tact which they performed their duties throughout last Sunday, the Greeks of Chicago should encourage and help them in every way to fulfill their ambitions.

    p. 1.- Thousands of Greeks were present at the Stevens Hotel. The young Greek Student's Brotherhood, Delta Epsilon Pi, of the University of Illinois, gave its second annual dance there ...

    Greek
    III B 2
  • Saloniki-Greek Press -- January 01, 1931
    "Toronto Globe" Uncle Sam and the "Dole"

    p. 2.- Uncle Sam, so recently symbolizing the greatest wealth in the world, now talks openly of the "dole" for relief in his own country. Congress is passing through a troublous time, debating how best to relieve distress and reassure a restless people. Whatever else the high tariff has done, it has not prevented hunger and unemployment.

    Since the opening of Congress, early in December, much time has been taken in making appropriations for the emergency, and with little practical results. In the welter of talk, Senator Borah dramatically appealed to his fellow-members to "do something for the people who are hungry." The New York Times refers to a $60,000,000 relief bill as carrying a dole of "human food." President Hoover's request for a $150,000,000 emergency building program to provide employment.

    2

    It is little wonder that a feeling of alarm has arisen. The Federal Treasury is confronted with a deficit of between $300,000,000 and $400,000,000, even though relief measures are kept down to the modest amount asked by the President.

    The rush of Congressmen to introduce bills is described by one newspaper as "the hysteria of relief" and there is fear that measures will lack coherency, cost vast sums of money, and still be disappointing in result.

    Senator Borah, who is celebrated for his cantor and freedom from dictation, brings the public back to earth with this statement. "If the public wants the expenditures, the public will have to pay the bill. There seems to be a widespread belief that you can restore prosperity from the public treasury. It is a false theory. Dire emergencies will have to be met from the public treasury, but the idea that you can restore permanent prosperity by spending public money, and thereby necessitating the imposing of more taxes, is unsound.

    3

    "I favor, therefore, holding down the expenditures as much as possible, a deficit is created, I favor increasing the income taxes especially in the higher brackets."

    All of which sounds ominous in the light of the extravagance of recent years. The results will also give the United States a mild taste of what has been endured by "poor old Europe."

    The experience will, likewise, prove an eye-opener for those who thought the Republic could sell to all the world, buy little or nothing and live in perpetual prosperity.

    p. 2.- Uncle Sam, so recently symbolizing the greatest wealth in the world, now talks openly of the "dole" for relief in his own country. Congress is passing through a ...

    Greek
    I C, I E
  • Saloniki-Greek Press -- January 01, 1931
    A Very Important Message for the Restaurateur of Chicago By George Palmer Patris, President-Illinois Federation of Restaurant Owners.

    p. 6.- Every restaurant owner no doubt is aware that there has been passed by our City Council a Restaurant License. This license covers the following lines: Restaurant, Drug Stores, Confectioneries and any other places that serve food to the public. This license specifies that all who serve food must meet these requirements: sanitation, ventilation, hot water of 170 degrees or chlorine must be used. This does not only mean that the restaurant must meet these requirements, but, everybody serving food to the public must meet them in order to receive a license, otherwise, they will not be allowed to serve food.

    The Illinois Federation of Restaurant Owners is taking steps to protect every restaurant owner, by giving special attention to drug stores, confectionery stores and others, that they get their license and meet all requirements before a license is issued to them.

    2

    To do this we ask the co-operation of every member to report to us any food establishment in their immediate neighborhood, that has not met the proper requirements before it has secured its license. Any names thus secured will be reported to the Health Department with a request to have a special inspection made.

    The office of the Illinois Federation of Restaurant Owners is open to any restaurant owner for complaints which will be held in confidence. There is no better way of reaching the man who serves food and who does not abide by the laws, than for every restaurant owner to co-operate with us and report the slacker.

    Our aim is for better restaurants, better management and, by all means, better co-operation and better feeling and this means greater success.

    Illinois Federation of Restaurant Owners.

    p. 6.- Every restaurant owner no doubt is aware that there has been passed by our City Council a Restaurant License. This license covers the following lines: Restaurant, Drug Stores, ...

    Greek
    I D 1 b
  • Saloniki-Greek Press -- January 01, 1931
    Triumphant Appearance of Miss Alice Diplarakou at the Trianon Dance Sponsored by the Ahepa (American Hellenic Educational Progressive Association) Great Enthusiasm Expressed by Thousands of Greeks Participating at the Trianon Dance Monday Evening

    p. 1.- The outcome of cooperation, the result of great planning, and efforts was the very successful dance given in behalf of the poor of Chicago, Monday, which was witnessed by the many thousands participating in the great dance sponsored by the Ahepa. It is a remarkable fact, that the Greeks of Chicago always participate in any praiseworthy event with enthusiasm.

    From a great success at the Aragon, to a greater success at the Trianon! The feeling of responsibility manifests the great vitality of the Greeks of Chicago. The right handling of our community affairs should produce remarkable results in the great Greek Chicago.

    2

    Our community is extended enough to successfully present Monday afternoon's spectacle to which men, women, and children came by the thousands to support a noble and philanthropic cause. The people's behavior gave the impression that all were acquainted. The old timers were present and also a great number of the younger generation, who are growing more popular by more often attending social affairs.

    The Arrival of Miss Diplarakou

    About 2 P.M. everybody was dancing and anxiously awaiting the arrival of "Miss Europe." As the minutes passed the dancing space of the great hall was abandoned by dancers trying to find suitable place to get a good view of the gracious Grecian maiden. While this was going on great commotion and applause were heard.

    Escorted by the sponsors of the dance and young girls of Chicago dressed as Muses, the Grecian beauty was conducted to the platform amid unbounded joy and enthusiasm. "Miss Europe" was presented to the audience in a smart address made by the lawyer, G. Spanon, Governor of the Ahepa.

    3

    As advertised, there followed a lecture by Miss Diplarakou with "The Delphian Festivals" as a theme. For more than thirty minutes, she kept the audience greatly interested. After the very educational lecture by "Miss Europe", a moving picture, taken last Spring in Greece and showing "The Delphian Festivals", was projected to the amazement of every one, due to the extent and educational value to every idealist and thinker from every part of the globe, who had attended the festivals in Greece, last Spring.

    At the termination of this classical reception and lecture by "Miss Europe," she thanked, in English, the sponsors of the dance and all present, for the wonderful reception.

    At this public appearance of "Miss Europe" many distinguished Americans were present. Among them was the Hon. John A. Swanson, State Attorney, who expressed his joy that Europe's most beautiful girl is in Chicago.

    Miss Diplarakou was escorted around the ballroom and balcony for people to see her better and admire her grace and beauty. While everybody was 4applauding, Miss Diplarakou left the Trianon, the people resumed the dance and talked about the exceptional success of the whole affair.

    The receipts were larger than expected and Chicago's Greek families in need will receive proper help and relief.

    p. 1.- The outcome of cooperation, the result of great planning, and efforts was the very successful dance given in behalf of the poor of Chicago, Monday, which was witnessed ...

    Greek
    II D 10, III B 2
  • Saloniki-Greek Press -- January 01, 1931
    Lysistrata Triumphs in Anglo-Saxon "Garb" Sedles Goes as Far as Law Permits. Norman Bell Geddes, a Flop by Demetrius Glympias

    p. 3.- Whilst not possessing everything required to make an Aristophanian play complete, the Lysistrata as performed by the Coburn players, is as good as should be expected under the circumstances. For, had Gilbert Seldes gone two steps farther, in being more true to the original, the hounds of the censors and the furies of the reformers would have swooped upon him mercilessly.

    The same cannot be said for the work of Norman Bel Geddes. His stage setting is so hopelessly anachronistic and inappropriate that, were it not for the classical costumes worn by the actors, one would even surmise the setting was intended for a Greek play. It is a drab, coffee-colored structure, in elongated perpendicular lines, monotonously tiring and uninteresting. In short, it is another cubistic eyesore, in the stretched 2meters of a modern city skyscraper, by Bel Geddes, without even an inkling of the rocky massiveness and architectural magnificence of the Acropolis pertained in Aristophanes.

    Lest the reader be led to believe that this writer has an aversion for skyscrapers, he wishes to make known, that he has not. In all sincerity, he hails the skyscraper as an outstanding achievement, (distinctly American) in the history of modern Architecture. But its effects cannot lend favor to the setting for a Greek play.

    So much for Seldes and Bel Geddes. Now a few remarks about the good work of the actors. Mrs. Coburn, in the stellar role, interprets her part masterly. Her fine acting in this play is reminiscent of her past successes in the roles of Iphigenia, Electra, Antigone and Media. Both she and Mr. Coburn have been devout admirers and tireless workers in the craft of Greek plays for more than two decades.

    3

    Nydia Westman, as Kalonika, is little short of charming. Her appeal for aid to surpress her ardent longings for love can command help from a man any time. The delivery of her lines, "Oh, goddess! ease the pains of labor", exacted a storm of laughter from the audience. Kalonika, you sure are a tropical mamma.

    Myrrhina, (Juliette Day) is an amorous dame with jet-black hair. She meets the return of her husband with lots of reluctant affection. She promises all to him. Makes everything ready and then gives him nothing. Poor Kinesias! It was a good thing peace was immediately signed, otherwise--, well 'tis better left unsaid.

    Of all the women in the cast representing the different cities of Greece, the women of Corinth were the most painted up. They were painted-up as they used to be in the good old days, with bold dashes of cobalt blue beneath their eye-brows, thick vermilion on their lips and rouge in abundance on their cheeks. They looked the prettiest of all the women in the cast. That is, from a distance. I wonder how the women of Lykoporgia look today.

    4

    We must not forget to mention Lampito, (Hope Emerson), the Spartan woman. She, too, played her part as though she were a regular he-man of the good old days. More power to you Lampito, and Mr. and Mrs. Coburn, we would welcome you back in another Greek play next season.

    p. 3.- Whilst not possessing everything required to make an Aristophanian play complete, the Lysistrata as performed by the Coburn players, is as good as should be expected under the ...

    Greek
    II A 3 d 1
  • Saloniki-Greek Press -- January 01, 1931
    Business Looms for Early Upturn

    With reports from most centers indicating that the volume of Christmas business was of fair proportions and up to expectations, interest has now been focussed upon prospects for the new year, particularly on what the trend will be immediately after January 1st.

    The usual Holiday quiet has been accentuated in some sections by a broader curtailment of industrial operations than is customary at this time, but there is a widespread impression that many enterprises are preparing to follow up the present pause with a sharp expansion of activity. It is rather plainly indicated that the steel industry, to cite only the most conspicuous of the industries which have restricted operations beyond the usual scope at the end of the year, will be obliged to step up its operations rather sharply, even on the basis of such increase in specification for January shipment as has already materialized. As a matter of fact, most steel producers are quite optimistic in their guarded comments on the current trend.

    With reports from most centers indicating that the volume of Christmas business was of fair proportions and up to expectations, interest has now been focussed upon prospects for the new ...

    Greek
    I D 1 a
  • The Weekly Zgoda -- January 01, 1931
    Polish National Alliance the Largest Polish Organization in the World (Editorial)

    While taking into consideration the accomplishments by, and the unusual growth of the Polish National Alliance during the fifty years of its existence, all its members, friends and critics here and in Poland agree in this, that the Polish National Alliance is the largest Polish organization not only in America, but also in the entire world, Poland included.

    The greatness of this organization can be measured by members, by wealth and by the service done to the community. As to its numerical strength, the Polish National Alliance comprises 300,000 members and is the largest Polish mass organization for a common purpose, with regular obligatory taxation, under strict regulations and discipline.

    Concerning the general wealth and financial resources, the Polish National Alliance can be proud of the following computation, namely; since the time it was founded in 1880 until the most recent general recount, Dec. 31, 1929, 2the Polish National Alliance has paid out $19,750, 706.85 in life insurance, and in the same period of time it has disbursed $3,740,233.34 for educational, national and philanthropic purposes in America and in Poland, which makes a total of $23,490,940.19. With the reserved funds of $18,595,685.62 on hand, Dec. 31, 1929, it shows that since the year 1880 the Polish National Alliance has collected for its designed purposes the total of $42,086,685.81, not including the additional income accrued in 1930 since the last general recount.

    However, although the above given figures are certainly large, they do not represent the entire wealth nor all the resources of that unique organization, as it owns, besides, numerous buildings in all States of the Union, libraries and well equipped local and district offices, with substantial cash on hand at the groups and district assemblies of the organization, that might easily increase the general wealth of the organization by at least a few additional millions of dollars.

    The Polish National Alliance is the most important of all Polish organizations also by the priority of the services it renders to the Polish immigrants and to Poland, as shown in the pursuance of its political policy. For it should be 3remembered that the Polish National Alliance-Zwiazek Narodowy Polski-although carrying the insurance business with it, was founded in Philadelphia, on Feb. 15, 1880, as predominantly a political society, and it remains so until today. It was in the pursuance of that self-assumed political role that in 1910, at the Polish Congress held in Washington D. C., the Polish National Alliance has attested to and manifested the necessity of giving Poland the national freedom and political independence, as if in anticipation of the World War of 1914 to 1918, which quickened the realization of the political liberty for Poland.

    Also, on the eve of the World War, the representatives of the Polish National Alliance were busy in cooperating with other Polish political factions, particularly with the so-called Komitet Obrony Narodowej (Committee for the National Defense), before it formed its own clear standing on the side of Marshall Josef Pilsudski and remained so until Poland became politically free. The political and national policies of the Polish National Alliance were enlightening the entire Polish immigration in the most important political affairs of the last fifty years.

    Of all Polish benevolent societies, the Polish National Alliance was the only 4one that had courage of conviction and of clear pronouncement in national affairs, with enough energy, fervor and sagacity to support the right cause not only with words, but also with deeds; and therein lies the real crown of the greatness of this Polish political organization in America until today. Throughout its entire history the Polish National Alliance has been the exponent of the Polish immigrants' national values. No wonder, therefore, that on the 50th anniversary of its existence and manifold national service, it is generally recognized that the Polish National Alliance fully deserves the honor and the privilege of being indelibly written into the Golden Book of great service and of great deeds.

    While taking into consideration the accomplishments by, and the unusual growth of the Polish National Alliance during the fifty years of its existence, all its members, friends and critics here ...

    Polish
    III B 2, III H, II D 10
  • The Weekly Zgoda -- January 01, 1931
    Christmas Donations at the Polish National Alliance Benevolent Association (Editorial, Women's Section.)

    [Translator's Note. The Benevolent Association, whose humanitarian services are narrated below, is an organizational subdivision of and within the Polish National Alliance (P. N. A.), the largest Polish organization in the world. Although the P. N. A. is itself also a benevolent institution in the sense that it carries the life insurance business, it has created within itself a separate benevolent body, called the Benevolent Association - Stowarzyszenie Dobroczynnosci - in order to carry out through it certain local charitable functions, which otherwise would take up a good deal of attention on the part of the Central Board of the P. N. A., sufficiently busy with strictly organizational affairs. The article so prefaced is as follows:]

    As on former such occasions, so also on this Christmastide, the Polish National Alliance has again donated through its Benevolent Association a conspicuous 2quantity of Christmas gifts to the needy Polish families. This time the donations consisted of 1,200 baskets, each one of which contained the following food articles: ham, bacon, flour, sugar, coffee, rice, canned vegetables, peas, apples, nuts, candies, macaroni and bread. This event took place at the Dom Zwiazkowy, 1406 W. Division street, on Sunday, December 21 (1930), under the supervision of the initiator and founder of the Benevolent Association, Mr. Jan Romaszkiewicz, president of the Central Board of the Polish National Alliance, with the assistance of Mrs. Magdalena Milewski, president of the Benevolent Association and vice-president of the Central Board of the Polish National Alliance.

    The money, spent on buying of the above mentioned food articles and amounting to a few thousand dollars, has been benevolently donated by local P. N. A. groups and by single persons.

    The membership list of the association includes mostly the women members of the Polish National Alliance, giving their time and work disinterestedly and covering all the necessary expenses out of their own pockets. This shows that in that organization charity towards one's neighbor is not an 3empty phrase, but consists in giving actual help to those in need of it.

    We intend to recommend at some later date that the members of the Polish National Alliance, residing in other towns and cities, should likewise institute similar Benevolent Associations.

    [Translator's Note. The Benevolent Association, whose humanitarian services are narrated below, is an organizational subdivision of and within the Polish National Alliance (P. N. A.), the largest Polish organization in ...

    Polish
    II D 10, II D 1, III B 2