The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Sitch -- January 01, 1930
    The Ties between the Sitch Organization and the United States National Guard

    In our last issue the Sitch Central Committee announced the confirmation of ties between the Sitch organization and the United States National Guard. Even before this many of our members had joined the 132nd Infantry so as to become American soldiers and thereby acquire more military training. Today our aim is to explain to our readers why we should join the United States National Guard.

    It is not beyond possibility that some will think that this is unreasonable, saying: How can one remain a Ukrainian patriot and still join the ranks of another country's army, thereby so seriously obligating himself to serve the interests of another commonwealth, when military service with all its burden and eventualities is only for war?

    Such a question might justly be raised among all honest people who have 2become accustomed to the serious outlook on life. Therefore we must answer in this manner: By joining the United States National Guard nobody impairs his patriotism, even as nobody harms it by becoming an American citizen. But by becoming a citizen of this country one is obligated to protect its interests against the enemy. If one were to become a citizen of the United States only because of the material and political advantages which this citizenship offers and was not willing to carry any of its burdens and obligations, it would be a contemptible procedure, and such a man never could be considered a good citizen.

    A Ukrainian has no country of his own as yet, and when he takes the oath on becoming an American citizen, he does not betray any one except the Austrian, Polish, Russian, or Roumanian government. Therefore, if you join the United States National Guard as a citizen of the United States, you do not gamble on raising the sword against your own country, as it might have happened to those of certain other nationalities who have entered the ranks of the American Army.

    3

    become accustomed to the serious outlook on life. Therefore we must answer in this manner: By joining the United States National Guard nobody impairs his patriotism, even as nobody harms it by becoming an American citizen. But by becoming a citizen of this country one is obligated to protect its interests against the enemy. If one were to become a citizen of the United States only because of the material and political advantages which this citizenship offers and was not willing to carry any of its burdens and obligations, it would be a contemptible procedure, and such a man never could be considered a good citizen.

    A Ukrainian has no country of his own as yet, and when he takes the oath on becoming an American citizen, he does not betray any one except the Austrian, Polish, Russian, or Roumanian government. Therefore, if you join the United States National Guard as a citizen of the United States, you do not gamble on raising the sword against your own country, as it might have happened to those of certain other nationalities who have entered the ranks of the American Army.

    4

    First of all we must consider this special aspect of our subject. The United States is the only country in the world in which a person can become a citizen and still not betray the nation of his birth or lose its spirit, for the simple reason that the American nation is composed of people of many nationalities who compose this mutually governing and working commonwealth. There is no other country in the world of which you may become a citizen and still remain a son of your European Fatherland, so that you can actually help it and fight for it. As an example we have here the Irish, who through a few hundred years of Americanization,have acquired all the necessary material resources and have carried on a fight against England for their independence and gained it.

    As another instance take the Poles, who with their American comrades gained the freedom of Poland. The Czechs achieved the same end through American soldiers who at the same time were Czechs and patriots, and the same thing happened to the Slovaks and the Lithuanians.

    5

    The nature of the American state usually favors the endeavors to attain freedom of those countries which are oppressed or abused and which have nationals among the citizens of the United States. We can maintain with absolute certainty that no other country in the world has this spirit, for not one of them would permit immigrants to found national societies or create military units to serve their oppressed native lands.

    America cannot have any colonizing intentions regarding the European countries; therefore it does not have them in regard to the Ukraine. Its intentions are clear and honorable. The American love of freedom is universally known. This love inspired America to help in forming national legions for the oppressed nations, and many who joined these legions were found to be good American citizens.

    It is true that we often hear Americans say that only that immigrant can make a good and patriotic citizen of the United States who was and is a 6good patriot with respect to his native land. This is true, for how can you love the country in which you were not born and be true to it if you do not love and honor the country in which you were born? But it is not difficult for our Ukrainian patriots to join the United States military service. There is no difference between Ukrainian and American patriotism.

    There is one important fact which influences the majority of our people, and that is that the United States does not have compulsory military service. The American Government does not force you to render military service as other countries do, and that is why it appears to Ukrainians that the United States does not regard such service as obligatory. Therefore, any one may say, "My home is on the border," and he may carry on his business in the hope that the army which he was not forced to join will defend him from the country's enemies. But he who truly accepts American citizenship and knows what it means to be a member of a commonwealth should understand that in return for all the benefits which he enjoys as a citizen of this vast American country he should help to carry certain burdens. Of these 7obligations the most important is that every normal and healthy man should help to defend the country in which he enjoys privileges and of which he receives benefits. He who does not care to defend this country came here only seeking something for nothing. The mere fact that we are American citizens should impel us to enter the United States military service so as not to hide behind the backs of other citizens, dwelling as peaceful inhabitants who seek only our own comfort, when instead we should be ready to give our lives for the country of which we have vowed to be loyal citizens.

    The United States maintains the so-called National Guard, the military organization which accepts all men who care to enlist voluntarily. This same service sent some millions of soldiers to the French front, thereby determining the outcome of the great war. Soldiers of all the [subjected] nations were enlisted in this military service, and as a result they now may boast of having their own countries.

    8

    Where were the Ukrainians then? Some of us called ourselves Austrians, others Magyars; and those who considered themselves Russians rejoiced because the Russian mobilization could not reach them here in the United States. Those Ukrainians, almost thirty thousand of them, even in the time of the war might have made their way into the United States Army, thereby getting to the front, but they did not form any fighting unit and did not have any political influence. They therefore had no effect on the destiny of our native land, for they were unorganized, and they had no prestige; hardly any one knew about them.

    Is it not time that we corrected this infirmity? We do not know whether there may not shortly be a new World War, which again will change the map of Europe, and in which again the fate of the Ukraine will be involved. No one can guarantee that it will not come to this. Let us suppose that this will not take place in our generation; is it not nevertheless worth while to have our own American-Ukrainian military unit here in the country where we are allowed to have such things?

    9

    As we mentioned above, the reason why the United States did not speak up for us Ukrainians is that we lacked Ukrainian-American soldiers in the World War. Now we may say, to console ourselves, that the will to found our own country was too weak at that time; the idea of a free Ukraine was limited to Ukrainians in Germany or Austria because the rest of our fighting men were in the same encampment with Russia, and therefore even America would have [been against any attempt of theirs to attain independence]. The result is that our politicians did not adjust themselves in time and came to their senses too late as usual, though the fact that it was too late was hardly our fault.

    We now see that America will be the one to decide the future conflicts of the world. Therefore whom should we conciliate for our cause if not America?

    There are two different advantages in creating a Ukrainian military unit in America: first, the national and political advantages for the Ukraine; 10second, the advantage for the individual Ukrainian-American, who will be benefited by it later on.

    The first advantage is political. If we have military unites in the American Army, Washington will officially recognize us as a nation. The American Government and its laws do not recognize those peoples who have countries of their own unless they declare themselves as nations striving to gain their independence, [demonstrating their purpose by] forming separate units in the American Army. The historic examples of this are the above-mentioned Polish, Czech, and Lithuanian legions; through them America recognized their peoples as nations--nations deprived of their countries. To put it briefly, in order that America may recognize us as a nation even before we have our own country, we must form at least one unit of the American National Guard. Therefore the first goal is that the Government of the United States shall acknowledge our national existence and the legitimacy of our efforts to attain independence.

    If the best and the largest unit of our potential Ukrainian Army shall be 11created and formed in America, then when it comes to founding our country, America and her Ukrainian citizens as soldiers of this army will have the right to say the deciding words, and no other Ukrainian formation will have that right.

    We, members of the Sitch organization, can and must achieve our aim because we are Americans! We must prove to America and to the whole world that we are a race fit to rule by our nature and by our cast of thought, even if only because we want to receive the confidence of American governing circles; and by enlisting in the National Guard we shall achieve the most important aim of our organization. If we do not achieve our aim, our Sitch organization will be merely a set of toy soldiers. Therefore, to put it briefly, the members of the Sitch organization have the opportunity to become real soldiers and to acquire all the military training requisite for modern warfare.

    Let us now view the individual and private advantages which the American 12Army offers. A member of the Sitch organization who enlists in the military service of the United States will be grateful to the United States for all the benefits which he has received and which he is to receive by living in this country. Every one knows what these benefits are, especially if he compares the misery and the political oppression from which he came with the life in America. A member of the Sitch society by enlisting in the Army has the opportunity to become a true patriot among honorable Americans and a full-fledged citizen. He ceases to be a foreigner and becomes a real American. Every one can understand how this may prove advantageous in future years. A Ukrainian who enlists in the National Guard has the opportunity to learn something, to broaden his education by pursuing many technical studies, very profitable for him and for the group which he frequents outside the service. The member of the Sitch organization who enlists in the National Guard finds himself in the company of good people who are conscious of their governmental and social obligations; therefore such a member has the opportunity to utilize his free moments culturally at the proper 13educational gatherings. Ukrainians enlisting in the National Guard also have a chance to learn dicipline and order, which our people sadly lack.

    Besides all the above-mentioned opportunities the founding of a Ukrainian military unit has one more advantage, perhaps the most important of all, namely, that these Sitch soldiers will play the principal part in the liberation of the Ukraine; therefore they will be the founders of a large and important Ukrainian army which under the leadership of Hetman Skoropadsky will create a new, invincible commonwealth of Cossacks and forever defend the freedom and the liberty of our native land.

    In our last issue the Sitch Central Committee announced the confirmation of ties between the Sitch organization and the United States National Guard. Even before this many of our members ...

    Ukrainian
    III D, III H
  • Novi Svijet -- January 02, 1930
    Christmas Party in Orphanage.

    The program was given on December 22, 1929, by boys and girls who have found shelter in the Croatian Childrens Home, DesPlaines, Illinois.

    In spite of the bad weather and blanket of heavy, thick snow that made roads almost impassable with abstructions, many had the courage to brave nature and make their way to Des Plaines, to visit the little ones whom a cruel fate had separated from their parents, and who depended upon the understanding of National Croatian Union members. (H. B. Z.) And on this understanding depends whether the children will, some day, become men and women, healthy physically, and spiritually, who can report with honor to the members of the H.B.Z. or National Croatian Union. On account of lack of space in the paper we regret that we cannot give the program in detail. But we will touch on some high spots.

    The program was opened by Mr.Kutuzovic, Supt. of the Home who congratulated the public for their interest and thanked the Board of Trustees for arranging presents for the children so that they would not feel forgotten.

    The program, of twenty-four parts, was listened to with quiet and sympathetic 2understanding, and on the faces of listeners one could see an unusual appreciation "Mother", recited by J. Cindric, touched us. It begins with these words:

    "I don't know what is Mother dear,

    Nor what is flame of Mothers heart,

    I don't know all she was to me,

    But that she was I can dimly see."

    Following this, "Be Yourself" was recited by Helen Kutuzovic. The school orchestra composed of twenty-six little musicians surprised us with a few nicely played marches which they had learned in last few weeks. That proves Mr. H.C.McNeal, as a good high school principal.

    The honor goes to the Central Executive Board of H.B.Z. for making it possible to teach the music in school.

    Mr. McNeal, in his speech given in English, thanked the audience for their interest in the welfare of the children. He mentioned that the executive board could not find a better pair to manage the Institution than Mr. and Mrs.Kutuzovic.

    It would be a good idea for the children to present the same program once in Chicago so that others may see what they know. Also, on that occasion, we could realize enough profit to buy Christmas presents, next year, for every child and eliminate the worries of the executive board in that respect.

    The program was given on December 22, 1929, by boys and girls who have found shelter in the Croatian Childrens Home, DesPlaines, Illinois. In spite of the bad weather and ...

    Croatian
    II D 4
  • Dziennik Zjednoczenia -- January 02, 1930
    Walter Filipiak Addresses Literary Circles

    Walter Filipiak, the newly elected president of the Polish Roman Catholic Union Baseball League of Chicago, and manager of the champion Brighton Stars, addressed the members of the Alliance of Polish Literary and Dramatic Circles convention, on Tuesday evening, at Five Holy Martyrs Hall. The peppy president outlined the work which is being done to promote sports in the organization.

    "While the literary and dramatic clubs were doing their share toward the Polish intellectual cause," he said, "the Polish Roman Catholic Union is not neglecting the physical development of its youth."

    Filipiak expects the Polish Roman Catholic Union Baseball loop of 1930 to be greater than any in the history of the organization. He is formulating plans by which he hopes to make the Polish Roman Catholic Union Baseball loop the best in the city. No definite date has been set for the initial meeting of the year by the congregation of baseball managers, but it is hinted that the league will get an early start in its affairs.

    Walter Filipiak, the newly elected president of the Polish Roman Catholic Union Baseball League of Chicago, and manager of the champion Brighton Stars, addressed the members of the Alliance of ...

    Polish
    III B 2, III E, II B 3, III B 4, II B 1 d
  • Osadne Hlasy -- January 03, 1930
    New Club Organized

    A Slovak cultural club has been organized which will be known as Club Furdek. Its purpose is to bring together Slovak Catholic students and former students, thereby promoting mutual acquaintance and the maintenance of the Slovak spirit.

    Only those who have attended high school at least two years, or who are skilled workers, trained in their special fields, are eligible to become members of this Club.

    A Slovak cultural club has been organized which will be known as Club Furdek. Its purpose is to bring together Slovak Catholic students and former students, thereby promoting mutual acquaintance ...

    Slovak
    III B 2, III C
  • Sandara -- January 03, 1930
    Annual Meeting of the Members of the Building Loan Association

    p.7...The Dollar Savings, Building and Loan Association, held its annual meeting December 26, 1929 at 2436 West 59th Street, Chicago, Illinois.

    The meeting was opened at 8:00 P.M., by P.J. Yuskevich, chairman of the Building Loan Association. A large number of members attended and participated in discussing various affairs of the association. For that reason the meeting was lively and interesting. The secretary made his report, and informed the public that the association has grown much stronger financially, and increased its membership. At present the association is in a very good financial position. Therefore, a net profit of seven per cent (7%) had been realized and was divided equally among the members of the association.

    All members were very well pleased when they received their dividends.

    2

    One of the most important decisions made at the meeting was that every member be asked to recruit at least one new member. In that way we will have the benefit of a larger membership, and at the same time we will be able to invest more money, thus earning a greater profit. The association will benefit ten-fold if we increase the membership. Every member should be interested and help to build up the association, which is very important to our people, especially, to those who want to make a sound investment.

    It is pleasant to know we have elected three well-known business men in Chicago, as new members of the board of directors. These three men are chairman of three different chapters of the Lithuanian Alliance of America. They are experienced, and will help the association to grow stronger and bigger. Mr. F. Siratavicius, secretary, is a well-known business man of Marquette Park; Mr. George Stungis, is president, and Mr. J. Pocins, chairman. The above mentioned, are newly elected executives of the Building and Loan Association. We are confident that the business of the association will increase during the coming year,and hope to obtain better results than last.

    3

    Therefore, it is advisable and proper for the Lithuanians of Marquette and vicinity to join the Building and Loan Association as soon as possible. Now is time to join and to start your savings account with the Dollar Savings, Building and Loan Association. New membership drive has just started. Those who want to join the Building and Loan Association should do so now.

    p.7...The Dollar Savings, Building and Loan Association, held its annual meeting December 26, 1929 at 2436 West 59th Street, Chicago, Illinois. The meeting was opened at 8:00 P.M., by P.J. ...

    Lithuanian
    II A 2
  • Magyar Tribune -- January 03, 1930
    Welcome Karolyi (Edited by Dr. Erno Lowinger)

    [Translator's note: This article appears in English in the Magyar Tribune.]

    As the boat is approaching the shores of U. S. A. which brings the distinguished Hungarian visitor, Count Michael Karolyi, the exiled and former President of the Hungarian Republic, the publicity-seekers, the super-patriots are very busy trying once more to exclude him from the United States.

    The National Patriotic League and the Woman's Patriot Publishing Company are protesting to the Immigration authorities to keep Karolyi out, as a dangerous alien.

    Our State Department, according to their official announcement on October 28, 1929, has granted him a Visa, permitting him to visit our country, thereby 2upsetting the previous ruling of Secretaries of State Hughes and Kellogg.

    We all may be assured of one fact, that Secretary of State Stimson has not acted in a hasty or superficial manner, when he changed the rulings of his two excellent predecessors, who are both followers of the same political school as he is.

    [So]that we may understand how this reversal of the previous decision came about,[it should be mentioned that]after a thorough investigation and[after] establishing the facts of Karolyi's political activities, the malicious and false information of his political opponents were eliminated.

    If Hungarians in this country try to exclude him, we can easily account for it!

    There are a few Hungarians who are misled by vicious propaganda and have absorbed it and worry about the arrival and admission of Karolyi.

    3

    It is true, he might say a few things about the antiquated feudal regime which has been ruling Hungary in the last ten years.

    It is true, he might give us an insight into the workings of the machinery by which the Princes, Counts and nobility of Hungary are keeping the upper hand over the Misera Plebs--workers and producers of the Hungarian nation.

    Well, what of it? Whom will that hurt?

    Out country can only benefit by this informative lecture course that Karolyi is undertaking. No one is compelled to attend and anyone who wants to attend should attend this in the same spirit as he goes to political meetings during the campaigns.

    If he is pleased, he applauds, if he is not, he listens and thinks his own way.

    We have read the interview with Karolyi by one of the ablest and most reliable 4American journalists in Paris--Mr. Arno Dosch-Fleurot of the New York World Staff. Among other things Karolyi said this:

    "I am going to lecture in English but will speak also in Hungarian to any group of Hungarians which wishes to hear me, regardless of the political opinion of its members, but I shall have nothing to say which will have any political bearing in America."

    This statement ought to be sufficient for our worried super-patriots that the fundamental structure of our beloved country will not be shaken through the lectures of Count Karolyi.

    To be frank, we consider it as a sign of intellectual weakness when our genuine American citizens protest against a lecturer of Karolyi's type.

    We think it will be a rare and piquant treat to listen to his lectures, unveiling 5the curtain about some of the secrets of Europe that we may know some of his interpretations of European political trends.

    We think it will be interesting to get his slant!

    As far as we know Karolyi's political career--and we know it is well as anyone--he is a victim of his own altruistic ideals and democratic principles. He is immaculately pure in character and honest to the core and this is more than we can say of the average statesman or politician. For these reasons alone, he deserves our attention and welcome.

    We Americans of Hungarian extraction congratulate the Washington Administration for granting him a visitor's Visa and extend to Count Michael Karolyi a hearty welcome!

    [Translator's note: This article appears in English in the Magyar Tribune.] As the boat is approaching the shores of U. S. A. which brings the distinguished Hungarian visitor, Count Michael ...

    Hungarian
    III H, III G
  • Sandara -- January 03, 1930
    [Lithuanian Christmas Party]

    Last Friday evening, December 27, at Petrokas hall, a Christmas party was held by the Lithuanian National League for the benefit of the members of the Young Lithuanian Choir. More than seventy children came to the party, some with their parents and others alone.

    The party started at 8 P.M. sharp with special program arranged for the children. This program consisted of various games, dancing, and singing, with a children's orchestra furnishing the music. There was great interest and enthusiasm. The party opened with the singing of the American national anthem, "The Star Spangled Banner," followed by the Lithuanian national anthem, "Lietuva Tevyne Music" (Lithuania, Our Fatherland).

    Then they started dancing their native Lithuanian dances, and American dances.

    While the children were dancing and having a good time, their parents were watching them enjoy their party with great enthusiasm. The parents, 2seeing their children having a good time, were tempted to join the party and have a good time with them. As a matter of fact, it seemed that nobody could refrain from joining the party. The affair started as a children's entertainment, but it soon became an entertainment for the grown-ups as well. We don't know which was so tempting to the parents, the music or their children.

    The evening passed very quickly while the children played and danced. After the dancing, Lithuanian candy and gifts were passed out to the children by the members of the Lithuanian National League. At the end of the evening everybody was well contented, children and grown-ups. They all had a good time and departed for home in a happy mood.

    Last Friday evening, December 27, at Petrokas hall, a Christmas party was held by the Lithuanian National League for the benefit of the members of the Young Lithuanian Choir. More ...

    Lithuanian
    III B 2, II B 1 c 3
  • Rassviet (The Dawn) -- January 03, 1930
    Events of the Knowledge Society

    On Sunday, November 22, about 1:00 A.M., at the hall of the Knowledge Society, the following were present: the chorus of the Society in a body, together with its conductor, V. V. Shumkov; representatives of the Knowledge Society; the public; children, who are invariably present at all Russian entertainments and so on...

    V. V. Shumkov who had previously finished conducting the chorus, nervously walked in the hall waiting for the guest of honor, the well known composer, A. M. Grechaninov, who is paying a short visit to Chicago. The expectation reached its climax, when finally there appeared in the door the familiar figure of Alexandre Tikhonovich... The chairman of the Knowledge Society, J. Erin, in a brief speech greeted the great composer and introduced the conductor V. V. Shumkov to him.

    The guest took the place reserved for him, and the somewhat nervous chorus began its program. A. M. Grechaninov listened to the chorus very attentively and from time to time exchanged remarks with the musical director of radio 2station WLS, who accompanied him. After the conclusion of the short program, Alexandre Tikhonovich expressed, in a brief speech, his admiration of such an excellently organized chorus and rendered tribute to its creator, V. V. Shumkov. To this, V. Shumkov thanked A. M. Grechaninov heartily, for honoring the chorus with his praise and begged him to allow to name the chorus in his name. A. Grechaninov agreed to this idea and remarked that he would be proud to tell of this in France, his second fatherland.

    Whereupon the conductor announced the news to the chorus, and his announcement was greeted with a storm of applause. After a short conversation with some of those present, A. M. Grechaninov left the hall to finish some important proof reading.

    He promised to visit the Society again on his return to Chicago. The public whose enthusiasm was aroused by this rare visit remained in the hall long after the guest had left.

    This modest celebration is especially important to the Knowledge Society which began its cultural work only a few months ago. The composer, A. M. Grechaninov, prominent representative of Russian genius gave his name to the young chorus 3and thus greatly helped it to gain a high reputation. Let us wish good luck to the Knowledge Society which has undertaken the good work of creating a center of Russian culture in Chicago.

    A member of the colony.

    On Sunday, November 22, about 1:00 A.M., at the hall of the Knowledge Society, the following were present: the chorus of the Society in a body, together with its conductor, ...

    Russian
    II B 1 a, IV
  • Osadne Hlasy -- January 03, 1930
    Midwest Slovak Catholic Baseball League Holds Official Presentation of Trophies

    The official presentation of trophies for the 1929 baseball season was made by Rev. John Lach, President of the Midwest Slovak Catholic Baseball League, at an informal dinner held December 18th, at the Geneva House, Whiting, Indiana.

    All trophies were won by St. Michaels of Chicago, but unfortunately their representatives were not present to receive them and therefore Rev. John Fedor of Chicago, accepted them in their behalf.

    The program for the evening began with a dinner, after which the presentation ceremonies were conducted by Father Lach. In a short speech he congratulated St. Michaels for winning the championship for the second consecutive year, and expressed his regrets at their inability to be present. He stressed the fact that good sportmanship has ever prevailed among the teams of the League and gave his best wishes for the continued success of them all.

    This occasion marked the third successful year of the Leagues' existence, and a more successful season than any previous one. All teams showed marked improvement.

    2

    All teams affiliated with the League are from the Calumet Region, with the exception of St. Cyril's and St. Michaels'.

    The official presentation of trophies for the 1929 baseball season was made by Rev. John Lach, President of the Midwest Slovak Catholic Baseball League, at an informal dinner held December ...

    Slovak
    II B 3, III C
  • Osadne Hlasy -- January 03, 1930
    This and That

    The American Slovak Citizen's League is working to have Michael Trenko on the ballot as a candidate for Judge of the Municipal Court, in the next primary election.

    It is the first time in history that a Slovak has had an opportunity of this kind. Therefore it is our duty to give him our support.

    The American Slovak Citizen's League is working to have Michael Trenko on the ballot as a candidate for Judge of the Municipal Court, in the next primary election. It is ...

    Slovak
    I F 5, IV, I F 1