The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Forward -- January 01, 1929
    Ten Years of the Forward in Chicago Editorial

    Ten years ago today the Forward, came to Chicago. It was in the year of 1918, when the members of the Forward Association granted the request of the Chicago Socialists and labor movement, to come to Chicago and establish a plant here and publish the daily Forward, in the same manner and the same form as the Forward is being published in New York.

    The first issue of the Chicago Forward appeared January 1, 1919, and that day was transformed into a great folk celebration, participated in not only by Chicago's labor movement, but by all other Jewish organizations to whom the Forward was the great and powerful people's newspaper, and who already for the last twenty years, has been the most significant factor in their spiritual and cultural life.

    2

    The coming of the Forward to Chicago ten years ago marked a new epoch in the social life of the Jews in the Middle West.

    Publishing the Forward in Chicago which is the center point between the East and West, made it possible for such Jewish centers as Detroit, Milwaukee, Cleveland and St. Louis to receive the Forward the same day, with all their important local news and occurences of the day.

    Therefore, this day the tenth anniversary of the Forward in Chicago is a jubilee not only for Chicago, but for the Jewish masses in the Middle West, and especially organized labor in the Jewish centers of the West.

    And just because of its interest in the labor movement in the various parts of the West and Middle West, the Forward was inveigled in to installing another plant in Chicago with a line of special editions for the various cities in the West. With this step the Forward had no profits 3in mind whatsoever, as at that time the Forward was too financially strong and powerful, to consider this undertaking of publishing the Forward in Chicago a source of increased income.

    And what is more, that time in 1919, was the most unfavorable time for such a great undertaking, this was a year after the World War, had ended. The entire country awaited an economic crisis, which came soon enough and hit with such powers that it was felt in 1920, and 1921 - so, that from a natural business viewpoint, it did not pay the Forward to make such an expensive move.

    4

    But on this, depended the need of serving in the best manner, a great part of the labor movement throughout the country, and the comrades of New York at that time demonstrated the true Socialistic spirit. They took it for granted that if Chicago and the Middle West must have the Forward, in order to strengthen the Jewish labor movement, then there was no question of how much such a move will cost. If the Jewish unions of Chicago, and the West, will gain, in the Workmen's Circle, will, by this move, become stronger and more powerful, if all the other parts of the Jewish social life in the West will start blooming, then that alone, is the greatest impetus for the Forward to take this step.

    At the present celebration of the tenth anniversary of the Forward of Chicago we can proudly say that the step we took ten years ago has provided a great success according to all indications.

    5

    The Forward has for the last three years been in their own beautiful and magnificent home that stands out like a bright star in the heart of Chicago's Jewish center. The machinery setting and printing the Forward is the last word in modern presses.

    The people engaged in all departments, from the girl at the switchboard to the manager, are all loyal and devoted to the Forward and feel as members of one large family. The home of the Chicago Forward is in the center of all branches of the Chicago labor movement that are organically connected with the Forward.

    Today, the first day of the new year, let that be the beginning of a new and peaceful life, let the new year bring more luck and peace into the world and a more fortunate life for those who create all the wealth in the world.

    6

    The new year shall awaken, in the workers of America, their needy political consciousness and lead them to a great victory in their struggle for a better life.

    Stronger and mightier may become the labor movement of America.

    Ten years ago today the Forward, came to Chicago. It was in the year of 1918, when the members of the Forward Association granted the request of the Chicago Socialists ...

    Jewish
    II B 2 d 1, I E
  • Chicago Greek Daily -- January 02, 1929
    The First of the Year

    The first of the year was celebrated in America in the particular fashion that Americans have adopted of welcoming the New Year.

    While it is true that nowhere in the world the first of the year provokes such enthusiasm as in America, it is also known that this enthusiasm causes an abundant sacrifice to Bacchus. In America we can furthermore say that the first of the year corresponds with the feast of Bacchus of the ancients, and no law can stop the sacrifices to the God of cheerfulness and joy.

    We Greeks, on the contrary, try to gain entrance to the shrines and sanctuaries of Fortune and to sacrifice before her even our last penny in order to gain her favor.

    And for us Greeks no law prohibiting card-playing could check us in offering our worship, on New Year's Eve, to the great God, whose name we changed to "St. Basil" when we became Christians.......(dots in the original-Translator). This custom is so well known to Americans that many special 2permits are issued by the police for the occasion, allowing card-playing in various Greek centers.

    This privilege has been granted to the Greeks since the establishment of the Greek community of Chicago, in the year of our Lord 1890, the first day of which the parishioners celebrated by playing "Tertso-tero" in the various centers of that time. But just because the police authorities did not yet know this Greek custom, they arrested all the players and led them to the police station, and it became necessary for the priest of the Greek parish, the late Father Fiampolis, in order to set them free to go there and state to the chief of police that it was a religious custom. And ever since that time they have been free to go on with their religious customs........(dots in the original - Translator).

    Faithfully, therefore, our fellow-nationals have celebrated this year also, in the most panegyric manner, their religious custom, at various public places and also at home with much reverence and compunction and with all-night ceremonies.

    The first of the year was celebrated in America in the particular fashion that Americans have adopted of welcoming the New Year. While it is true that nowhere in the ...

    Greek
    I B 4
  • Magyar Tribune -- January 02, 1929
    The Burnside Hungarian Reformed Church by Eugene Boros, Pastor

    Despite the severe cold weather, the special meeting that was scheduled for January 13 was well attended. According to the elders' annual report, the Burnside Hungarian Reformed church has an adult membership of three hundred two. The church's total income was $6,173, of of which $1,000 was paid on the mortgage and $789 for benevolent purposes. The rest of the money was used for the upkeep and support of the church, with the exception of $364 carried over to the next year.

    Despite the severe cold weather, the special meeting that was scheduled for January 13 was well attended. According to the elders' annual report, the Burnside Hungarian Reformed church has an ...

    Hungarian
    III C, II D 10
  • Svenska Tribunen-Nyheter -- January 02, 1929
    Real-Estate Transactions

    Sigfrid Monson sold the six-apartment building at 8127 Maryland Avenue to Agatha Eisenberg for $55,000.

    Alvin M. Johnson sold the sixty-apartment building at 4625 Drexel Boulevard to William H. Darlington. As part payment, the seller took title to a tract of land near Ladysmith, Wisconsin.

    Sigfrid Monson sold the six-apartment building at 8127 Maryland Avenue to Agatha Eisenberg for $55,000. Alvin M. Johnson sold the sixty-apartment building at 4625 Drexel Boulevard to William H. Darlington. ...

    Swedish
    II F, II A 2
  • Greek Daily -- January 02, 1929
    Daily Items - the First of the Year

    p. 1.- The first day of the new year was celebrated in that special fashion the American people have of welcoming the New Year. It is true that in no other part of the world does New Year's Day incite such great enthusiasm as it does in America.

    It is also known that this enthusiasm provokes ample sacrifices to "Bacchus."

    We can truly say that in America New Year's Day lives up to the tradition of the ancients, and there aren't any prohibitive laws able to stop the sacrifices on that day to the "God" of gaiety and joy.

    In contrast with the American people, we, the Greeks, try to get into the impenetrable and solve the secret of destiny by sacrificing on that day our last penny to appease bad fortune and incite good will.

    2

    There are also no laws prohibiting us to play our card games and offer our adoration on New Year's Day to our "God" whom we have named "Saint Basil" since we accepted Christianity.

    This custom of ours (of playing cards on New Year's Day) is so generally known by the American people, that on that day special permission is given by the police to allow card playing or rather gambling, in all the Greek centers.

    This privilege was given to the Greeks on the establishing their first colony in Chicago in 1890. In that year they celebrated their first New Year's Day in America by playing their national game called, "Passeta" or "Fairbanks," in all the Greek centers of that time.

    Due to the fact that the police authorities did not know this Greek custom, they arrested all who were playing cards and brought them to the police station. Then the ever memorable Father Fiampolis went to 3the police authorities and by explaining to them that it was a religious custom and a national tradition to play cards and bamble on New Year's Day, he not only secured the Greeks' freedom but they were given permission to continue observing their national tradition.

    Faithful as ever, our countrymen celebrated on New Year's Day, gambling and playing cards in all the different Greek centers with the greatest devotion in the all night celebration.

    We wish them happiness and many returns of the day of "Saint Basil."

    O. Antilogos.

    p. 1.- The first day of the new year was celebrated in that special fashion the American people have of welcoming the New Year. It is true that in no ...

    Greek
    III B 3 b, I B 4
  • Svenska Kuriren -- January 03, 1929
    [Hall Wins Shooting Prize]

    To hit the bull's eye is evidently not any effort for our well-known countryman, County Architect Eric E. Hall. At the annual "turkey shoot" arranged last week by the Lincoln Park Shooting Club, Mr. Hall's score was one hundred percent, thereby giving him first prize. Four contestants scored ninety-eight per cent, and three, nine-seven percent.

    To hit the bull's eye is evidently not any effort for our well-known countryman, County Architect Eric E. Hall. At the annual "turkey shoot" arranged last week by the Lincoln ...

    Swedish
    II B 3, IV
  • Abendpost -- January 04, 1929
    John Haderiein, 61 Years Old, Died Yesterday

    John Haderlein a well-known personality among the old settlers of German-Americans, passed away. He was born in Northern Bavaria and lived more than forty years in Chicago. He represented the interests of the local German-Americans at all times. John Haderlein was a member of the Schwaben Verein and a true and sincere supporter of the affairs of his fellow countrymen in the city council of which he was a Democratic member for thirteen years. John Haderlein started his activities in Chicago as an employee of the Wacker and Birk Brewing Company; later, between 1890 and 1912, he managed a restaurant on the Northside. In 1920 he ran as candidate for Congress in the tenth district against Carl R. Chindblom and was defeated.

    John Haderlein a well-known personality among the old settlers of German-Americans, passed away. He was born in Northern Bavaria and lived more than forty years in Chicago. He represented the ...

    German
    IV, I F 5
  • Magyar Tribune -- January 04, 1929
    Seething Revisionist Movement (Editorial by Dr. Erno Lowinger)

    Although we have repeatedly expressed our views on the movement for the revision of the Trianon treaty, we must clear up one or two points to dispel any doubts.

    We, too, believe that the peace treaty of Trianon is unjust. We are willing to do anything in our power to bring about its revision, as long as we don't come into conflict with American laws by doing so.

    We believe also that the Trianon treaty has affected the Hungarian people and has caused much suffering and privations to the Hungarian working class. The Trianon treaty is too stringent and cruel. In our opinion its revision is necessary, especially for the interests of millions of Hungarian workers.

    It is a well-known fact that the kettle of the revision movement is boiling 2again in Magyar-America, where different ambitions and efforts are striving for recognition.

    Some persons are trying to push themselves to the fore to satisfy their egoistic aims. Others think that by taking part in this movement, they can stimulate their business.

    Still others want to be rewarded for their "unselfish" patriotic activities by the Hungarian government.

    All of these noble and ignoble motives or aims are negligible in our opinion.

    We can truthfully state that none of the aforementioned motives or aims can be applied to us. Nevertheless, we do voice two conditions which should be borne in mind whenever there is a gathering of Hungarian-Americans discussing the revision of the Trianon treaty.

    3

    Always and everywhere we must declare that the movement for the revision of the Trianon treaty is not in the interests of Hungary's feudal lords and priesthood, but in behalf of the oppressed, impoverished Hungarian people. Furthermore, the movement stands for the establishment of a democratic form of government and the restoration to Hungary of Hungarian territories.

    We must also explain clearly that we do not condone the present tendency of the Hungarian government to restore the king to the throne. The American-Hungarians are true to the ideals of the American Constitution and sympathize with a republican form of government. We would not make a move to help to the throne a degenerate member of the Hapsburg dynasty, or any other aspiring feudal lord.

    4

    Our other stipulation is that we should not follow or foster such Hungarian politics here as would be objectionable and in direct conflict with American political interests.

    In Italian circles, a few fanatical leaders wanted to start a Fascist organization on the pattern of Mussolini's organization. The result was that the American press made public this un-American activity, which proved very embarrasing to Italian-Americans, and which was discussed even in Congress.....

    Before the Trianon treaty revision movement becomes more serious, it would be advisable to ask the proper United States authorities whether or not it is legal for American citizens to organize an active political party for the revision of the Trianon treaty here in America.

    If we do not ask this information now, then when the movement has gained momentum and will mean something to the Americans, others who oppose the revision will do it. It is not necessary to say that the enemies of the 5revision of the Trianon treaty are numerous and that they also have influential friends in the proper places.

    Let us remember, too, that it is an easy matter to persuade liberal America to form an unsympathetic attitude toward the dictator-ridden....Hungary.

    We believe that not even for the sake of this revision movement we would want to acquire the reputation of not being faithful and responsible citizens of our adopted country.....

    During the past twenty-five years we have seen, more than once, instances of feverish enthusiasm toward a cause in Magyar-America, yet the results were always--we are sorry to say--nil.

    6

    We are all horrified by the injustice of the Trianon treaty, because it is terrible.

    But our justified resentment should be told and explained to our influential American friends, to gain their sympathy toward this cause. This would be the proper method in our endeavor to gain our goal--revision of the peace treaty of Trianon.

    Let us not overexert ourselves in this cause.....Let us use brains, not brawn.

    Although we have repeatedly expressed our views on the movement for the revision of the Trianon treaty, we must clear up one or two points to dispel any doubts. We, ...

    Hungarian
    III H, I C, I G, III B 2
  • Danish Times -- January 04, 1929
    Earl Juul, Committeeman

    Earl Juul, the son of Congressman Niels Juul, has been appointed Committeeman of the 35th Ward. He fills the office because of the death of his brother Herbert Juul.

    Earl Juul, the son of Congressman Niels Juul, has been appointed Committeeman of the 35th Ward. He fills the office because of the death of his brother Herbert Juul.

    Danish
    IV, I F 5
  • Magyar Tribune -- January 04, 1929
    Proclamation to the People of Magyar-America

    "Magyars!

    "We are speaking to all who came from the land of the Magyars, and with the New Year's greetings we knock at each door:

    "Come all, and let us act!

    "There are many hundreds of thousands of us who have worked for the same causes for decades--for our spiritual country, Magyar-America, where the memory of our mother country is uppermost in our minds.

    "Our past, present, and future are our own, and our affairs also. We have only one calling and in it our numerous problems that have accumulated during the years. The situation is comparable to that of a family in the life of which the hardships of years have left their mark, and to 2which the gate of the future has just been opened.

    "It is proper that we get together. It is proper and necessary. Our mother country is calling, and our own work summons us. We hear the voices of our fathers and our children every minute of the hour. The time has come for a final reckoning.

    "We are living and working--in mines and factories. We till the soil, we use the pen, we analyze our thoughts and feelings. We work with our hands, brains, and hearts in the thousands of Hungarian organizations that we have created. And there is not one among us who does not know that our life is setting and that we must perform our work while we are alive. We must all act together in every way, because we can't lease our feelings and wishes to anyone, for we have had countless proofs that the lessees of our lives deliberately commercialized our most sacred causes.

    "God, country, brother, mother, joy, sorrow, ideals, adoration, each 3heart throb, have all been shipwrecked because we allowed them to end in that way. Hundreds of banners waved at times in the service of a cause. Sometimes they were side by side and often one against the other. And we always contributed and we always suffered.

    "Magyars! This state of affairs cannot go on! We number hundreds of thousands, and we must voice our wishes when anything happens to us, for us, or through us. Magyar-America is not an oligarchy, but a free land of the Magyars. It is a free ship manned by hundreds of thousands in an ocean of opportunity. Who should steer it but we ourselves?

    "In the future, we will not agree to any flag unfurling or mass movement until our people and all their organizations, as well as delegates from other Hungarian settlements, shall meet for a conference and decide on a method of activity. We will also follow only the leader appointed at such joint conference.

    4

    "We who are speaking in the interests and in the name of the people of Magyar-America, wish to discuss our common problems and the creation of a perpetual Hungarian forum. For three days, beginning on March 15, the glorious Hungarian memorial day, the Hungarians of Buffalo, New York will herald a national convention and call upon all Hungarian churches, societies, and other organizations, as well as newspapers, to send their delegates. At the same time, let it be known that any true Hungarian has a right to be present at this national convention.

    "It is not the curse of Trianon alone that weighs on our shoulders. Our work program must be complete. It concerns our children's fate, the future of our societies, the problem of our orphans and the care of the old and infirm.....

    "Our aim is peace and work, and we wish to take care of our problems independently of outside interests. The scope of our work requires a national conference. Magyars, come, let us act!

    5

    "We are and remain our Hungarian brethren's true brothers.

    "In Magyar-America, December, 1928." [A list of twenty-eight names of newspapers and their editors is appended.]

    We will comment on the foregoing proclamation in our next week's issue, and until then recommend its contents to our readers.

    "Magyars! "We are speaking to all who came from the land of the Magyars, and with the New Year's greetings we knock at each door: "Come all, and let us ...

    Hungarian
    I C, II B 2 d 1, III B 2, III C, III H