The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

Filter by Date

  • Przebudzenie -- January 01, 1928
    A New Disgrace

    To some of our Polish brothers the fact of being in Irish-German servitude does not seem to be adequate enough. They desire to impose upon themselves a new Italian servitude.

    A small group of good thinking Poles on the Northwest Side of the city organized a parish under the name of the Holy Family, and invited an Italian macaroni eater to ordain them and take care of the new parish.

    Naturally, the Italian welcomed the offer and spread his shepherd's care over a flock of not very fastidious Polish sheep. Not knowing the Polish language, he has to perform his duties by signs, or in a macaroni-noodle-like dialect.

    The flock recommended itself most laudably during the Christmas holidays. At that time there appeared in Dziennik Zwiazkowy and advertisement in form of an article, which emphasized the patriotic feelings of this group, for whom one of the most solemn masses was conducted by an Italian 2macaroni eater, Ferraro, and another one by even more renowned, certain Carfora.

    Moreover, the latter archapostle of macaroni eaters fortified the spirit of our compatriots with his noodle-like benediction from a throne specially erected for him.

    As we see patriotic feelings live among our people. We have to congratulate our brothers on their new success in their emancipation.

    To some of our Polish brothers the fact of being in Irish-German servitude does not seem to be adequate enough. They desire to impose upon themselves a new Italian servitude. ...

    Polish
    III C, I C
  • Sitch -- January 01, 1928
    Aid for Those Who Suffered from the Flood

    The Ukrainian District Committee of Chicago and its suburbs collected five hundred and fifty dollars for those Ukrainians who suffered from the flood in Galicia. Complying with the wishes of the contributors, they sent this sum there through the office of Bishop Bohachewsky of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

    The above-mentioned sum was raised by means of concerts, dances, plays, and many individual contributions. We hereby extend our hearty thanks to all the contributors, and further urge that, with the approaching Christmas holidays, we do not forget our poor countrymen in the old country.

    The Ukrainian District Committee of Chicago and its suburbs collected five hundred and fifty dollars for those Ukrainians who suffered from the flood in Galicia. Complying with the wishes of ...

    Ukrainian
    II D 10, III H, III C
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- January 02, 1928
    "Hanoar Hoivri" Jewish People's Institute.

    A general meeting of the "Hanoar Hoivri" was held Sunday, January 15, at the Jewish People's Institute, at 7:30 P. M. sharp.

    The large attendance and enthusiastic spirit of all the members indicated the interest of the Jewish youth of Chicago in Jewish problems, in the reviva of the Hebrew language, and the creation of a permanent Hebrew cultural and social center for the Hebrew speaking youth of Chicago.

    A. Schiff, former secretary of the "Hanoar Hoivri," addressed the audience in Hebrew, pointing out the duties and responsibilities of the Jewish youth in the great historic moment of our national and cultural renaissance, and urging the members to lend their assistance and whole hearted support to the progress and development of this organization.

    2

    A. Liebenson, ex-president of the "Hanoar Hoivri," made a brief report on all the social and cultural activities of this organization in the past, and outlined its prospective activities for the future.

    A general meeting of the "Hanoar Hoivri" was held Sunday, January 15, at the Jewish People's Institute, at 7:30 P. M. sharp. The large attendance and enthusiastic spirit of all ...

    Jewish
    III E
  • Abendpost -- January 03, 1928
    German Societies Celebrate New Year.

    New Year's Eve' and the two holidays were taken advantage of by a number of German societies, to give the usual festivities in different places of amusement. In spite of the cold weather, large crowds attended.

    Saturday the Rhine Society ushered in Carnival time with its first "Fools meeting." President John Cruner carried the scepter, and the people who attended thoroughly enjoyed themselves.

    New Year's Eve' and the two holidays were taken advantage of by a number of German societies, to give the usual festivities in different places of amusement. In spite of ...

    German
    II B 1 c 3, V A 1, III B 2
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 03, 1928
    St. Stanislas Kostka's College Alumni Association to Pold Benefit Dance

    A benefit dance sponsored by the St. Stanislaus Kostka's College Alumni association will be held January 10 at Guyon's Paradise ballroom, Crawford Avenue and Washington Boulevard. The proceeds of the dance are to go toward the school fund.

    The dance committee has arranged a variety of entertainment. It is their contention that no one attending the dance will regret it. They claim that this is one of their finest affairs. Judging from past performances, a treat is in store for everyone.

    Tickets are $1.00 per couple. They may be obtained at the offices of the Dziennik Chicagoski, from any Alumni member, or at the College headquarters.

    This dance is worthy of your support.

    A benefit dance sponsored by the St. Stanislaus Kostka's College Alumni association will be held January 10 at Guyon's Paradise ballroom, Crawford Avenue and Washington Boulevard. The proceeds of the ...

    Polish
    II B 2 f, I A 1 a
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 03, 1928
    Three Hundred Attend Wilno Society Banquet

    New Year's day was one of gala festivities for the members and friends of the Wilno Young Men's Society at the Oakley Auditorium. Over three hundred persons participated in the affair, which was held Sunday evening. From the opening of the program to the very close, success prevailed. Many outstanding personages from St. Anne's and St. Adalbert's parish added prestige to the festive evening.

    The success of this affair is largely a result of the experience gathered from several of such annual occasions. This year's affair was planned many months in advance. Many of the new members had contributed a great deal of hard work.

    The popularity of these annual affairs has made possible the ever-increasing number of members. Today, there are over five hundred of them, with a treasury fund of about ten thousand dollars. Their activities in the social and national sphere increase with the membership.

    2

    When the doors of the Oakley Auditorium were opened at 7 P.M. Sunday, the places at the gaily decorated tables were quickly occupied by early comers. Soon after 8 o'clock, all reservations were filled. From the standpoint of attendance, the banquet was a success alone. But this was not the only feature.

    The dinner--and what a dinner--was prepared by the well-known Polish epicure, Ignac Lenard. The many tasty courses were devoured with zest.

    After the appetizing meal was finished, the chairman of the banquet, Stephen Mojsiejewicz, called upon the toastmaster. Stephen Tyrakowski, prominent banker and P.R.C.U. (Polish Roman Catholic Union), member from St. Anne's parish, to open the program. The toastmaster gave an interesting and humorous discourse on the many activities of the Wilno Society performed in St. Adalbert's and St. Anne's parishes. He complimented the members who were responsible for a large part of the work. Mr. Tyrakowski, from the very beginning, proved to be a capable toastmaster. His reign throughout the evening was one of admiration.

    3

    and his quips between speeches were masterpieces that will remain long with the audience.

    The first speaker to be called upon was Dr. M. Borzec. He gave a short and snappy talk, and concluded by wishing that no one present would need a doctor during the course of the year. (Dr. Matthew Borzec is a true blooded member of the Wilno Society.)

    Musical numbers by Dylag's orchestra followed. A popular Polish hymn was played. "Tesknota Za Ojczyzna" (Yearning for the Fatherland) was played as a violin trio, with orchestral accompaniment. Misses Josephine Ryzewska, Helen and Ann Jarkowicz were the young artists.

    Miss Wanda Kozarzewska sang selections from the opera, "Halka." Piano accompaniment was played by Miss W. Armatys. The operatic renditions were acclaimed by all.

    4

    When the musical numbers were completed, the president of the society, S. Perchorowicz was called. His speech was based primarily on the activities of the organization. The gist of it being to spur the members to bigger and better work. He was followed by Sigismund Stefanowicz.

    "Clou" sung by Miss Mary Gruszczynska, called the Polish songbird by many, was the musical highlight of the evening. She enraptured the guests with Polish and Russian songs. To climax her glorious entrance, she sang in English. The soft, sweet treatment of her numbers won her thunderous applause. Miss Wanda Swierczek played the piano accompaniment.

    Mr. Tyrakowski concluded the festivities at the table by thanking all for their fine co-operation, and wishing them the season's best.

    This entertainment did not terminate the affair. The orchestra began playing, and many a merry polka and waltz were danced before the festivities came to an end.

    New Year's day was one of gala festivities for the members and friends of the Wilno Young Men's Society at the Oakley Auditorium. Over three hundred persons participated in the ...

    Polish
    III B 2, III C, III B 3 b
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 03, 1928
    How to Get Our Children to Read Polish Books (A Letter)

    Concerned not only about the spirit of our Polish youth, but with its moral and religious standards, I came upon an idea which, if placed in practical use, will benefit the students and ease the work of the school in training them. The Dziennik Chicagoski publishes various kinds of books by Polish authors at the nominal cost of ten or fifteen cents. These books are not written in any sensational style to gain popularity or material gain for the author, but are written to awaken the spirit of youth toward Catholicism and nationalism.

    Our school children of today purchase various kinds of cheap American novels and popular magazines, many of which are harmful to the spirit of the student. A characteristic example of the above statement is the present American generation, which at the earliest age, became accustomed to reading the most common literature, and graduated to reading love stories and the like at maturity.

    2

    The publishers of these books and magazines, primarily interested in harvesting fields of gold, appeal to the lowest instincts of their readers. This brings about the lowering of moral standards. A recent disclosure by Doctor Jacobson, after a study in this field, substantiates the above statement. He stated that this country is bringing up gangs of thieves, perverts, and insane persons. Taking this into consideration, are we to follow their example and imitate everything they do, or have we fallen so low that we cannot pursue something better? Let us concentrate our thoughts and spirits in a direction that will be worthy of us--toward better spiritual and moral standards which will place us above all others.

    In order to maintain the purity of the Polish spirit, we must stay clear of the present course of the American generation. we must attach ourselves more closely to the precepts of Catholicism and our nationalism. Without doubt, we may be criticized for this, but this will soon pass. The critics will realize that "blessed is the fruit of our lives."

    3

    Oh, how different it would be today if Jesus Christ would have catered to the Pharisees and other Jewish priests. The annals of the history of the world would be utterly strange. Who could hazard a guess as to the kind of civilization that would be dominant today? Yet one thing is certain, and that is that there would be no Christianity. We can see, therefore, that in order to counteract the backward trend we must strongly resist the present day attitudes, and work toward higher ideals. We must have courage, suffer many hardships and make sacrifices....However, our position is safe here because neither Siberia nor any threats of imprisonment await us. Although criticism would be flung at us for this, it would not last long. Therefore, we could accomplish definite steps in this direction without any funds of any kind, if we only wish to do this.

    I suggest that all the school teachers of Polish schools influence their pupils from the third grade up to purchase books advertised in the Dziennik Chicagoski. Then, once a month, the teachers could choose a particular Polish book and discuss the contents in class. During vacation time, certain books could be 4suggested as reading matter. A reading list of this kind would cover the historical, literary, and social background of Poland. Books about our famous heroes could also be added. In this respect, the work of the teachers would not be wasted, and the students would familiarize themselves with the lore of our country.

    Adam Adamczyk,

    2318 Rice Street.

    Concerned not only about the spirit of our Polish youth, but with its moral and religious standards, I came upon an idea which, if placed in practical use, will benefit ...

    Polish
    I A 2 b, I C, I B 4, I B 3 c
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 03, 1928
    America and Her People in the Eyes of the Europeans Religious Point of View (Editorial)

    The well-known French economist, Professor Siegfried, says if anyone actually wishes to understand the source of American influence he necessarily must revert to the English period of Puritanism during the 17th century, because the civilization of the United States is basically protestant. The Puritans consider their fellow-citizens bad Americans if they pay homage to the religion of other civilizations such as the Catholic religion. When this fact is ignored, then one looks upon America and the Americans with an improper point of view. Professor Siegfried is of the opinion that America is not only Protestant from a religious and social angle, but it is also Calvinistic in many respects.

    In spite of the increased flow of German immigrants, Lutheranism did not gain the position expected. In temporal matters, the only law is force, and because of this, it cannot be literally adapted to the life of the New Testament.

    2

    Good laws are founded by Lutheranism only in supernatural matters. This is true especially in a land where a King or a prince peacefully rules by obtaining the privilege from God. Lutheranism has as its object the perfection of the individual.

    The Calvinists are of another opinion. They consider such doctrines as dangerous, and contend that the duty of individuals is not the perfection of themselves, but the cooperation with other individuals in the native country in conveying to the world the will of God. Hence flowed the Calvinistic tendency to purify the sins of all society, people, and the country at the same time.

    Lutheranism permits separate service to God and separate service to the country. This is not true among the Puritans and Calvinists. They join these two conceptions into one because they believe the teaching of Christ ought to reveal itself in all walks of life. Here arises a typical example for the Anglo-Saxon feeling of social duties.

    A Catholic cannot comprehend these conceptions. He cannot understand why a 3group and not a single person should be the fundamental unit of society. He cannot understand and will never grasp why the 'purification' of the society of all nations should begin with the groups and not the individuals. It is plainly evident that the group can only be good when all of its individual members are equally as good. This has been met with dislike from the very beginning in America by people who have always gone their own way, for they were not of the opinion that everything an individual person possesses should serve the groups. Relative to these conditions, Professor Siegfried attentively considers whether anything can be said about the unquestioned law of the freedom of the individual.

    Puritanical democracy has, in reality, its own laws and obligations, which differ widely from those of Latin democracy, making it thoroughly individualistic. Second in importance is its aristocratic morals. The American Protestants consider themselves exclusive in the vocation of missionary work. Not only do they have missions in this country, but they spread their teachings the world over for the purpose of "elevating humanity." This religion has established its paradise mostly in England and America. It 4is here that they pursue their inspirational crusades against smoking cigarettes, drinking alcohol, and even feminism and pacifism found its origin within their ranks. The Americanization of immigrants in the United States has also been included in their drives. Every American Puritan, including the converts, feels some kind of inward, ungovernable necessity of learning the entire gospel. Then, too, they cannot put it into their heads to let the people think for themselves for a while. And if someone would suggest this they would feel offended for they would be of the conviction that the people would get lost without them, that they could not do anything for themselves. On this basis, they reveal their own alleged superior morals in the presence of others and act accordingly. They consider themselves the messengers of God, and secretly hope that others would recognize them, for which they promise to lift them to their moral level.

    Consequently, circumstances among the American people altered a great deal relative to the belief that all people are equal. This is true in the 5politics of American immigration, especially when the question of race superiority arises. They will also try to prove that the understanding of equality among the people is applied to religious affairs, but a deeper discussion of this will reveal that the Protestant comprehension in this respect is greatly limited.

    On these grounds, one is free to form the opinion that democratic Catholicism is, at least, better than the Protestant in the field of law for man. The Catholic Church teaches that Jesus Christ died on the cross to save the world, while the Calvinist has in mind only the chosen ones.

    Luther has recommended to all his followers that they exert all their physical strength for the services of the country, but did not mention anything about the powers of the soul. This neglect was considered by him as necessary, for he did not desire his followers to enjoy worldly things with authority and clear conscience. Calvin, on the other hand, united his religion with every day duties of life, because he deemed that if one did his daily obligations better, earned more, and accumulated riches, he added to the glory of God.

    6

    But the Catholic Church has never recognized riches as a symbol of piety. The Church firmly instructs that even the most penurious person can possess a noble soul and find himself closer to God than many a rich man.

    The Puritans believe differently: They consider their wealth as an exceptional reward and honor bestowed upon them, and treat this accordingly, particularly considering themselves as a specially privileged group among the others. From this arises an uncommonly complicated apprehension in the mind of the Puritan, because he does not know where his duty ends in this respect; thus begins egoism. But he is well off this way, for even his neighbors judge him as he does himself. No wonder then that it is difficult to discern his true religious aspirations from his egotistical desire for enrichment. Plainly, the religion became materialized, although its followers endeavor in a long run to examine all problems not from a material standpoint, but spiritual as well. However, this is only a remnant of the past and a pleasant personal deceit.

    To Europe, this unknown materialization of religious beliefs played a very 7important part in the accumulation of wealth in America, which convinces the people all the more in their convictions. Religious materialism greatly enveloped the influx of assimilation of the immigrants, as everyone will concede that no other American ideal applies so greatly to the immigrant. This country's wealth is, therefore, the greatest threatening danger to the nationalistic groups, who endeavor to preserve their particular language and culture. This has been true throughout the ages. If we are to look for an example among our own Polish group, then we must confirm this on the strength of evident examples: amidst the poor Polish group the Polish spirit is greater than among the rich; while one hears English spoken among the intelligent Poles, the native tongue is predominant among the lower classes. However, we are guarding ourselves against unraveling from this movement as if the Polish spirit would permit itself to be supported through Polish poverty. For the above example only confirms the characteristic fact in the actions of Americanization, which no one can overlook while examining Americanization among the Poles.

    The well-known French economist, Professor Siegfried, says if anyone actually wishes to understand the source of American influence he necessarily must revert to the English period of Puritanism during the ...

    Polish
    I B 4, I J, I C, III C
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 03, 1928
    Szymczak Named Vice-President of Polish Bank Many People Call Personally to Offer Their Congratulations; Many Flowers Sent.

    [Half-tone-one column-eighth of a page, view of Kowalki, showing Szymczak bank vault]

    At the "White House", located at Milwaukee Avenue and West Division Street, the home of the Polish banking institution, the Northwestern Trust and Savings Bank, hundreds of good wishers came to congratulate Professor M. S. Szymczak on his new appointment as vice-president of the bank. Crowds began to gather immediately after the business closing hours last Saturday afternoon to wish him well. Flowers and telegrams were sent throughout the day. Many friends, businessmen, and politicians called in person also.

    The new vice-president passed out cigars to the men and chocolates to the ladies as a token of appreciation for their kind and generous wishes. This, 2indeed, was a great occasion for him to celebrate the Christmas holidays among his friends. Professor Szymczak, having held the position as Superintendent of the Cook County Forest Preserves, without doubt will be able to handle the various problems that may arise during his initiatory days of his new position. His wide popularity will be of great service to him.

    Baskets of flowers in honor of the occasion were sent by: Anton J. Cermak, President of the Cook County Board; John Jaranowski, Mayor of Calumet City; Thaddeus Szymczak, brother of M. S. Szymczak; Francis J. Wilson, Cook County Commissioner; The Democratic Organization of the 41st Ward; The Cook County Forest Preserves' Police Department. Congratulatory telegrams were sent by: Dziennik Chicagoski; E. J. Hasten of the Chicago Journal; Charles Climer, president of the Illinois Building and Loan Association League; Dr. James J. Losty of De Paul University; T. L. Frankenthal of the Equitable Bond and Mortgage Company; Robert Boniel, director of the Edgewater Beach Hotel; Henry Fabian of the First National Bank; William E. Dever, former mayor; and others.

    3

    Some of the city's leading citizens who called in person were: Thomas Gordon, business manager of Dziennik Chicagoski; A. F. Lakowka, advertising manager of Dziennik Chicagoski; Anton J. Cermak; Alderman J. Toman; Francis J. Wilson; Chick Evans, well-known professional golf star; John Jaranowski; A. Kingery, manager of the Chicago Regional Planning Association; Stanislaus H. Klarkowski, Municipal Judge; Peter Rostenkowski, treasurer of the P. R. C. U. and Albert Soska, president of the Polish Alma. Mater.

    August J. Kowalski, treasurer of the Northwestern Trust and Savings Bank, wished Professor Szymczak the best of luck in his new position.

    The Northwestern Trust and Savings bank is popularly known as Smulski's Bank.

    [Half-tone-one column-eighth of a page, view of Kowalki, showing Szymczak bank vault] At the "White House", located at Milwaukee Avenue and West Division Street, the home of the Polish banking ...

    Polish
    II A 2, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 03, 1928
    Three Hundred Christmas Baskets Given Out by the Polish Democratic Club of the Thirty-Third Ward

    Three hundred Christmas baskets were given out to needy Polish families in the Thirty-third Ward by the Polish Democratic Club, according to a report made at the final meeting of the year, held December 27 at Orzechowski's hall, Blackhawk and Dickson Streets.

    An election of officers was held, and the following members were elected: Anthony Cichowicz, president; Jacob Kuklinski, vice-president; Francis Litterski, second vice-president; Edward Chepek, Secretary.

    Those citizens of the Thirty-third Ward who have not joined this organization can do so by attending the meetings held on the last Thursday of each month.

    Three hundred Christmas baskets were given out to needy Polish families in the Thirty-third Ward by the Polish Democratic Club, according to a report made at the final meeting of ...

    Polish
    II D 10, I F 3