The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Saloniki-Greek Press -- January 01, 1927
    (No headline)

    Appeal to the Greeks of Tegea.

    A general meeting of the Tegeatas is called, to form a society whose object will be to teach and prepare the Greek girls of Tegea to become useful house-wives and mothers, so that they may be better qualified to mold the future of their children, not only with Greek principles, but also with the prevalent progress of the new generation.

    Appeal to the Greeks of Tegea. A general meeting of the Tegeatas is called, to form a society whose object will be to teach and prepare the Greek girls of ...

    Greek
    III E, V A 1
  • Saloniki-Greek Press -- January 01, 1927
    Appeal to the Greeks of Tegea

    A general meeting of the Tegeatas is called to form a society whose object will be to teach and prepare the Greek girls of Tegea to become useful housewives and mothers, so that they may be better qualified to mold the future of their children, not only with Greek principles, but also with the prevalent progress of the new generation.

    A general meeting of the Tegeatas is called to form a society whose object will be to teach and prepare the Greek girls of Tegea to become useful housewives and ...

    Greek
    III B 2, I A 1 a
  • Saloniki-Greek Press -- January 01, 1927
    Real Estate

    The Greeks of Chicago, stimulated by the suggestion of Mr. Salopoulos, editor of Saloniki, have begun to invest their money in Real Estate more than ever. The Greeks, having implicit faith in Mr. Salopoulos whose integrity is beyond reproach, bought heavily from one of the leading sub-dividers and developers, named Thomas K. Valos Realty Co. Mr. Thomas Valos, "and Company," are the sole owners of the Olympia Highlands, where they intend to build a new city. Other Greek Realtors, such as Geo. K. Gatsis Realty Co., Geo. P. Ciagouris and Co., Melidonis and Co., and Peter J. Eliopoulos, have sold thousands of lots to the Greeks of Chicago. Many other Realtors are doing good business wth the Greeks.

    The Greeks of Chicago, stimulated by the suggestion of Mr. Salopoulos, editor of Saloniki, have begun to invest their money in Real Estate more than ever. The Greeks, having implicit ...

    Greek
    II F, II A 2
  • Vilnis -- January 03, 1927
    Starting the New Year (Editorial)

    Once again we say good-by to the old year - 1926 - and say hello to the new year-1927. The Vilnis is greeting a new year for the first time as a daily working class newspaper.

    The Vilnis had been faithfully serving the cause of the Lithuanian working class movement in the Middle West for over five years. The first issue of the Vilnis appeared on April 8, 1920, as a weekly newspaper. Later it was converted into a semi-weekly. On 2Sept. 18, 1926, thanks to the courageous and untiring efforts of our working class organizations and individuals, the Vilnis became a daily. The Lithuanian-American labor movement now has two daily newspapers -- the Laisve (Liberty), in the eastern states, and the Vilnis (The Wave), in the Middle West.

    The Vilnis is the first Lithuanian working class newspaper published in Chicago. The two extinct Lithuanian dailies that were published in Chicago -- the Lietuva and the Katalikas -- were not working class newspapers because they were mainly in the service of the Lithuanian bourgeoisie. The same is true with the other two active Lithuanian dailies in Chicago -- the Naujienos and 3the Draugas. The Vilnis is the only Lithuanian daily in Chicago exclusively in the service of the Lithuanian working class movement.

    Just as we had predicted the Daily Vilnis has caused a great increase in activity and power among the Lithuanian-American working class. No other Lithuanian newspaper in America has such a large army of contributors, correspondents, and friends.

    Therefore, in starting another new year, the Vilnis, promises not only to remain in the service of the working class, but also promises to make an effort to improve the contents of the Daily Vilnis.

    4

    The old year is dead, a new year has been born, but our trials and tribulations are old. Beginning with the new year, we must labor with new energy, and with renewed determination to make the new year more successful than the past year.

    Once again we say good-by to the old year - 1926 - and say hello to the new year-1927. The Vilnis is greeting a new year for the first time ...

    Lithuanian
    II B 2 d 1, I H, I C, I D 1 a
  • Dziennik Zjednoczenia -- January 04, 1927
    Dr. Thaddeus Mitana Lectures

    Dr. Thaddeus Mitana, outstanding lecturer on Polish language and literature at the University of Michigan, will lecture, on Sunday afternoon, January 15th at 3:30 P.M., in the large hall of the Polish Women's Alliance. The lecture is under the auspices of the Polish Arts Club and is receiving the cooperation of the Department of Education of the Polish Womens Alliance of America. Members and friends will please note that to postpone the lecture from the second to the third week of January, it was necessary to suit the convenience of Dr. Mitana.

    Dr. Mitana delivered a lecture in Chicago a year ago, leaving a very favorable impression with all those who heard and met him. The history of Polish culture from the physical standpoint was the subject of his lecture last year; the subject of his next lecture will be announced as soon as it has been decided upon. Dr. T. Mitana was called to the University of Michigan, one and one-half years ago, as instructor of Polish language, and literature. Last summer Dr. Mitana visited Poland, returning in September again to resume his work at the University. He will, no doubt, have much of interest to tell us concerning the progress of education in Poland. Dr. Mitana will be entertained at the home of Mrs. V. B. Zielinski, president of the Polish Arts Club. Following the lecture on Sunday a supper will be given in his honor by the club members.

    Dr. Thaddeus Mitana, outstanding lecturer on Polish language and literature at the University of Michigan, will lecture, on Sunday afternoon, January 15th at 3:30 P.M., in the large hall of ...

    Polish
    II B 1 d, IV, I K, III B 2, II B 2 g
  • Vilnis -- January 04, 1927
    They Speak for Everybody (Editorial)

    Secretary of Labor James J. Davis and Secretary of Agriculture Jardine, after fully satisfying their appetites with food and drinks, started the new year by delivering addresses in the name of all the workers and farmers of America. The former stated that the workers are enjoying wonderful "prosperity" Secretary Jardine said that the farmers are enjoying wonderful "prosperity" also. Neither of these two gentlemen know anything at all about the life of the workers and poor farmers. Evidently they figure that if the steel trust and other corporations 2are making gigantic profits then the workers and farmers are also enjoying "good times." However, such reasoning is all wrong. That is admitted even by some members of the bourgeoisie. A Congressman from Georgia recently made the following statement about those corporation profits:

    "These fabulous corporation profits mean that a small army of corporation magnates, who are heartless, inhuman, dishonest, unpatriotic, soulless and without conscience, are taking advantage of certain laws to exploit millions of wearisome and suffering men, women and children."

    After explaining that wealth, gained by means of exploitation 3of the workers, brings about misery and want to millions of people, the Congressman from Georgia concluded with the following remark:

    "And that is called prosperity, good times. It is good times only for a lion who has captured a young eagle."

    Those who have plenty to eat and drink do not know what it means to be in misery and want. Industrial magnates and their servants in Washington will probably say that the Congressman from Georgia made the above remarks during "an uncontrollable bit of frenzy." The capitalistic newspapers are even trying to make a joke out of his remarks. However, steel and mine workers, whose sweat produced those gigantic corporation profits, know that the Congressman from Georgia spoke the truth.

    Secretary of Labor James J. Davis and Secretary of Agriculture Jardine, after fully satisfying their appetites with food and drinks, started the new year by delivering addresses in the name ...

    Lithuanian
    I D 1 a, I L, I H
  • Onze Toekomst -- January 05, 1927
    The Chicago Jenish Mission of the Christian Reformed Church

    The visitation of Jews, in their homes or places of business is part of our work. In this, all missionaries participate and, on the average, we pay about sixty visits per month. We do this work systematically. For this we have a "card index"system. For each family, whom we visit, we write a card on which is written the name, age, and the nationality of the members, whether they are orthodox, modern, or unbelieving Jews, whether they own a Bible, and in which classes and meetings in our mission, the various members of the family participate. As soon as one of us comes in contact with a new family, a card for that family is written. To get acquainted with a new family we must have a medium. In our city, we find the doors to the homes of those not known to us mostly locked. Now the medium we often find in the children, who visit our classes. We also find our medical work, a very good medium to get more intimate with new families.

    2

    If someone has had help from us, once, then he stands ready as a rule to let us in later, when we knock at his door. We consider this work very useful.

    We not only get to know the peculiar characteristics of the Jews, their habits, religious understanding, and their normal life, but we also get better acquainted with those who attend our mission from time to time.

    This is necessary if we want to acquaint ourselves with their spiritual needs. If we with to speak to a person, according to his ability to understand, then we must know him. In this "house visitation" we often experience much that is discouraging, but sometimes encouraging. Another time we hope to tell something about our experiences.

    William Yonker.

    The visitation of Jews, in their homes or places of business is part of our work. In this, all missionaries participate and, on the average, we pay about sixty visits ...

    Dutch
    III C, I C
  • Dziennik Zjednoczenia -- January 05, 1927
    Dangers of War between Mexico and United States

    The Republic of Mexico, with President Calles as its leader, is conducting a religious war in Mexico, as well as an economic war with its powerful neighbor, the United States. This is a typical economic war between two countries. The most important reason for this conflict is the exploitation of Mexico by American industry. At one time, President Diaz opened the door of Mexico to the United States for exploitation, hoping that better uniform economic conditions would ensue.

    In the year of 1901 it relieved foreign capital of taxes, the importation of machinery and the exporting of oil was also free from taxation. In the year of 1907, the United States settled, and assumed property ownership in Mexico. An English Association, Pearson Co., did likewise and Holland followed in 1923. This started a dispute among these nations. In the year of 1923, American co-operations offered president Huerta $200,000,000, for exclusive rights and options to their oil fields. However, a revolutionary outburst, in Carranza, made it impossible to reach an agreement. Because of financial pressure at end of 1913, Washington, broke diplomatic relations with Mexico, and in the month of April 1914, stationed an army at Vera Cruz. This action did not meet with the approval of European nations. An open warfare was started.

    2

    The United States had an entirely free hand. An Expedition under the command of General Pershing, was sent to Mexico to take disciplinary action, which resulted in attacks and invasions by Mexican bandits along the borders of United States. Mexico will reply that the constitution of Queretaro of 1917, included articles of defiance against foreign finance. The most important part is; "The land ownership rights are restricted and confined, only to the nations of Mexico, and concessions to mine, coal, and established water power projects. Mexico can also grant the rights to all foreigners, providing they do not seek the influence of their governments" thus: American may not acquire land or any territorial rights within the radius of 100 miles of the border.

    It is lastly stipulated, that foreign stock companies are not privileged to acquire tillable land. This enactment caused the United States to be angry, and created a panic in the stock market. It was understood that the investment of American capital is estimated at $2,000,000 dollars; some of the American productive co-operation branches controlling 90 percent of ownership. Any addition to the amendment of the constitution, would be a loss of great wealth. Under pressure, Washington, in 1919, brought to attention, the conditional paragraph of foreign ownership in Mexico; and president Obregon, was officially praised by the-administration in Washington. According to this agreement condition, the amendment will bind only those foreigners who in the future desire to exploit the wealth of Mexico.

    3

    However, President Calles, in spite of the tradition set by his predecessor, and without regard, began applying rules to the constitution. After conducting a series of acceptances, he designated the first day of January as the date when all foreign interest will be under government jurisdiction. This resulted in a severe reprimand by the United States, in a note, in which they expressed their readiness to object, unless Mexico conforms to a decision handed down by the Supreme Court in Hague. The Calles administration will dissolve the oil industry, supporting the action of a revolution among their workers. It will effect the reducing of production, and the increasing unemployment.

    In this conflict, noble opinion would favor the nation in which they set up a dominion of foreign capital. In addition to this unwarranted conflict, the question of religious persecution was added. This, of course, is a conspiracy instigated by the enemies of the church; using unemployment as a tool for discontent and corruption, and creating thereby an artificial stimulus for religious conflict. They wish to place capital and religion on one battlefront, this manuever should not proceed. With a non-partisan view, one can readily determine the real enemy - American capital; and the imaginery one - religion.

    The Republic of Mexico, with President Calles as its leader, is conducting a religious war in Mexico, as well as an economic war with its powerful neighbor, the United States. ...

    Polish
    I G, I D 1 a
  • Abendpost -- January 05, 1927
    Joseph Schlenker Dies.

    Joseph Schlenker, 4929 Wentworth Avenue, died suddenly at the age of 78 years. He was a veteran of the German-French war of 1870-71 and a co-founder of the German Veterans Union of Chicago in 1874. His demise will be deeply mourned in German circles of Chicago, because almost all his life he fought for the interests of the German element of Chicago.

    Joseph Schlenker, 4929 Wentworth Avenue, died suddenly at the age of 78 years. He was a veteran of the German-French war of 1870-71 and a co-founder of the German Veterans ...

    German
    IV, III A, II D 1, III B 2
  • Dziennik Zjednoczenia -- January 05, 1927
    Polish Arts Club

    The following amendments of the constitution of the Polish Arts Club, will be voted upon at the business meeting on January 9, 1927 at 3:30 P.M. in the club room of the Art Institute.

    1.- Article II will be amended by adding the following paragraph : "Rendering moral and material aid to promising Polish and American writers, musicians, artists and students of the Arts."

    2.- Article III, section 2, will be amended to read as follows: "Regular, Student, Sustaining, Life and Honorary Members. Paragraphs a, b, c, d, will remain the same. Paragraph e to read as follows: Only those who have performed meritorious services in the cause of music, literature or other arts, especially of Poland or the United States, are eligible for honorary membership.

    Names of honorary members will be presented and voted upon in the prescribed manner for constitutional amendments.

    The following amendments of the constitution of the Polish Arts Club, will be voted upon at the business meeting on January 9, 1927 at 3:30 P.M. in the club room ...

    Polish
    II B 1 d