The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Svenska Kuriren -- January 01, 1925
    Sweidsh-American Line to Run its Own Chicago Business

    The Middle-West business of the Swedish-American Line, which since the inception of the Line in 1915, has been handled by a general agency here in Chicago, is from Jan. 1st, 1925, to be taken over by the Line. John Sjunneson has been appointed representative in the Middle-West, officiating from the newly established Chicago headquarters, to succeed Martin Maurd, general agent. The present offices at 70 E. Jackson Blvd. will be retained.

    The Middle-West business of the Swedish-American Line, which since the inception of the Line in 1915, has been handled by a general agency here in Chicago, is from Jan. 1st, ...

    Swedish
    II A 2, III H
  • Svenska Kuriren -- January 01, 1925
    The Gustavus Adolphus Tercentennial, 1932

    The various Chicago congregations, forty-two in number, of the Augustana Synod, are already laying plans for the festivities in connection with the Tercentennial Gustavus Adolphus jubilee to be held in 1932. A general meeting of this Chicago group has been called for Friday evening, Feb. 20th, at Orchestra Hall, at which time a combined chorus from all the congregations will sing. His Excellency Axel F. Wallenberg, Washington, D.C., has been invited to be present and to address the meeting.

    The various Chicago congregations, forty-two in number, of the Augustana Synod, are already laying plans for the festivities in connection with the Tercentennial Gustavus Adolphus jubilee to be held in ...

    Swedish
    III B 3 a, II B 1 a, II B 1 c 3
  • Svenska Kuriren -- January 01, 1925
    Concert by the Swedish Choral Club

    At the concert given last Friday evening, Dec. 26th, 1924, by the "Swedish Choral Club", at Orchestra Hall, this rightly famous choir's rendering of Haendel's "Messiah" was received with a great ovation. The hall was packed to capacity. The chorus, as well as the fifty-piece orchestra, selected from the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, was conducted in a masterly manner by Edgar A. Nelson, ably assisted at the organ by Harry A. Carlson. The soloists were Else H. Arendt, soprano, Arthur Boardman, tenor, and Herbert T. Gould, bass.

    At the concert given last Friday evening, Dec. 26th, 1924, by the "Swedish Choral Club", at Orchestra Hall, this rightly famous choir's rendering of Haendel's "Messiah" was received with a ...

    Swedish
    II B 1 a, IV
  • Vilnis -- January 02, 1925
    Enlightenment

    The Mutual Training School will not hold its session as usual at Vilnis Hall on account that the American-Lithuanian Workers' Society has a conference next Sunday morning at the same place.

    Every Monday evening after New Year there will be a class on speech, literature and general writing for all those who have time to attend.

    Every Wednesday evening lectures are given about general science at Vilnis Hall, to all those who attended last year. Many professional and intelligent people have been invited to deliver the lectures. Mark the day on your calendar.

    The Mutual Training School will not hold its session as usual at Vilnis Hall on account that the American-Lithuanian Workers' Society has a conference next Sunday morning at the same ...

    Lithuanian
    II B 2 f, I A 3, II B 2 g
  • Chicago Chronicle -- January 02, 1925
    (No headline)

    A bill now pending before Congress to create a national radio commission, a sort of censorship, is being strenuously opposed by Alderman Jacob Avery, chairman of the radio commission appointed by Mayor Dever.

    This proposed bill will vest in Congress the power to control and regulate radio transmission and broadcasting throughout the country. The Judiciary Committee contemplated a thorough story of the subject and have public hearings on the so-called White bill.

    The Council's action is the result of a resolution introduced yesterday by Alderman Avery (24th Ward), chairman of the mayor's radio commission. The resolution, which was referred to the Judiciary Committee, provided for the submission of a memorial to Congress urging defeat of the White bill and enactment of laws creating a national radio commission similar to those governing the interstate commerce commission.

    A bill now pending before Congress to create a national radio commission, a sort of censorship, is being strenuously opposed by Alderman Jacob Avery, chairman of the radio commission appointed ...

    Jewish
    III B 1
  • Chicago Chronicle -- January 02, 1925
    A Jewish Press Club. Editorials (1)

    Some years ago a Jewish press club was organized in Chicago. Though the organization was short-lived, owing to personal antagonisms peculiar to the time.

    Now comes the suggestion (from the Chronicle, be it said) for another Jewish club of the same kind. The time is over-ripe for such a project. The Jewish population of the city is several times greater than it was at the time of the first attempt. The number of Jewish writers and those interested in the written word is incomparably greater. But as yet we have no center, no organized facilities for fostering interest in literature and art in general.

    2

    We need such a center, such a group, to encourage writers, to bring out the talent that often is stifled for lack of a little moral assistance, to speak and act coherently for the community. When a great son of our people comes to this city, someone who has done something worth while in any field of knowledge, such a group could "do the honors" efficiently, economically and enjoyably; whereas, now, there is no one to take the lead in such matters.

    But with a Jewish press club, arts club, the situation would be marvelously changed for the better. True, there is the Peretz Schreiberverein, but this is merely a union of Yiddish scribes, for professional purposes. What we have in mind is an organization of literati, professional and amateur, and of those interested in other arts, whether as workers or as patrons; an organization operated on a broad scale for the benefit of the community as a whole.

    Some years ago a Jewish press club was organized in Chicago. Though the organization was short-lived, owing to personal antagonisms peculiar to the time. Now comes the suggestion (from the ...

    Jewish
    III B 2
  • Reform Advocate -- January 03, 1925
    (No headline)

    Nathaniel A. Mayer, 68 years old, died on December 29. He was the son of one of Chicago's oldest families, a former banker and lately prominent in the real estate business. In the banking business he was associated with his father under the name of Leopold Mayer & Son.

    He was a member of the Illinois Athletic and Standard Clubs, Chicago Real Estate Board, and the Sinai Temple.

    Nathaniel A. Mayer, 68 years old, died on December 29. He was the son of one of Chicago's oldest families, a former banker and lately prominent in the real estate ...

    Jewish
    IV, II A 2
  • Saloniki-Greek Press -- January 03, 1925
    Chicago Greek Professionals Fete New Yorkers.

    Last Sunday evening at the La Salle Hotel forty Chicago Greek professionals feted two Greek colleagues from New York, Mr. P. Koryllos and Mr. Geo. Karanicholas, eminent intellectuals.

    The two New Yorkers spoke enthusiastically of this New York Greek Professional Club, and were amazed that the Chicago Greek professionals are not as yet organized. The Chicagoans without much ado acknowledged their negligence and at once chose an organization committee to prepare plans for a Greek professional club in Chicago.

    Invitations were sent to those who did not attend the banquet, to attend the next meeting so the whole group can pass upon the proposed idea of organization.

    Mr. Haloulos, the youngest of the Chicago professionals, acted as master of ceremonies, and despite his youth and inexperience, conducted the affair excellently.

    Last Sunday evening at the La Salle Hotel forty Chicago Greek professionals feted two Greek colleagues from New York, Mr. P. Koryllos and Mr. Geo. Karanicholas, eminent intellectuals. The two ...

    Greek
    II A 1, III B 2
  • Radnik -- January 03, 1925
    Milan Glumac Jurisic, the First Jugoslav Revolutionary in America

    It was in the year 1907, at the time of the great crisis which shook capitalist America, that many predicted a revolution of the masses. In those times a small group of workers came together in Allegheny, Pa. (the present city of Pittsburg) to start a campaign against the enemies of the outlawed poor and against the capitalistic system.

    Being connected by the Social Democratic Party of Croatia at Zagreb and not having among themselves able leaders and organizers, they wrote to the Central at Zagreb to send them a leader. For that purpose a collection of $94.25 was made for traveling expenses. A workers' paper was to be published but there was no editor available.

    At that time there lived in Croatia a young man who was in the way of many of the leaders of the labor movement. He was a Social-Democrat, but quite different from all other leaders. The working men liked him, 2the authorities hated him, other leaders disliked him. Keen, but clever; a born revolutionary, he was driven from place to place. He was not wanted by anybody, until finally he was drafted into the army. He was Milan Glumac.

    For his own good as well as that of the Socialist Party, Glumac was chosen to go to America and start Socialist propaganda among Jugoslav workers. Glumac wrote to his comrades in America: "Dear Comrades: The Central Committee of the Socialist Party wants me to go to America. I accept because of my personal situation and your needs. It will help the movement and myself to evade the army into which I was drafted though sick. We will work shoulder to shoulder against capitalism. I am ready to come."

    A few months later Milan Glumac was in America. At a meeting for publishing a Croatian workingmen's newspaper, the Radnicka Straza, he said: "Comrades! Contemplating in this short time the life of our immigrants, I came to the very sad conclusion that the worst elements among them are their leaders, who are the meanest frauds, the boldest adventurers, bearers of stupidity and immoral outcasts. With such leadership our people is doomed. They are ready to commit any crime against the immigrant, 3without remorse or feeling of responsibility. That means it is our duty to enlighten and to organize the Croatian workers in the Socialist ranks. Be not deceived, that will not be an easy matter, but against capitalism and its servants we must lead an unmerciful fight.

    All were in accord with the above statements. Glumac moved from Allegheny to Chicago, where a Socialist branch was also organized. A short time after, on December 25, 1907, the first number of Radnicka Straza was published.

    On its first page was a fiery proclamation addressed to the Croatian immigrants written by the editor, Milan Glumac.

    The closing words of the proclamation were: "Workmen, outlawed brethren! Turn from you adventurers who represent themselves as patriots but in fact are for capitalism and fraud. Long enough you have been cheated by them. Take your fate in your own hands. Join a great circle of working men. Take care of yourselves. Do not allow wolves to take care of the sheep.

    4

    Radnicka Straza appears at a time of greatest misery. This newspaper was created to help wretched and miserable workers and they must support and keep it. Forward, for the holy work and justified struggle! We must not remain miserables and slaves forever. Forward! Subscribe and read Radnicka Straza."

    After only a few years of strenuous work, the Jugoslav Socialist Federation grew larger, and the newspaper had more subscribers. All the work rested on Glumac. There was no money to hire co-workers. The editor and his wife shared the office of Radnicka Straza for their living quarters. The place was crowded and dark. Many persons unemployed came to the office to get warm. Life was full of misery, but Glumac never complained. When his presence was most needed he became sick with tuberculosis. That was in 1911. Glumac left to recuperate in Missouri and later in California. He returned to his dingy office, where he died January 5, 1913.

    When asked how he became tubercular, he related his life story thus:

    5

    "I was born in 1884 at Bosanski Samac. I was born of poor parents who had me learn the printing trade. That paid little and was a killing job, at least during my apprenticeship. I worked here and there and became a typesetter in Budapest, where I worked for the Narodna Rijec (People's Word), a Socialist paper. I also wrote articles and did well because I read much and did propaganda work since I was 18 years old. After that I went to Narodni Glas ( People's Voice), at Novi Sad, as editor, with the duty of going out to towns and villages to agitate. I did this work gladly. In the town of Srijem (Sirmium) I held one of my most successful meetings. From afar came peasants on wagons and on foot, under red banners. The meeting, most demonstrative in form, was calm and very dignified.

    "The next day I was taken to jail by gendarmes. Without any hearing I was told (I was) to be deported to my domicile as a person dangerous to public peace and order. On the spot I was ordered to leave, guarded by a policeman. Traveling on wagon and on foot I reached, after a long wandering, my domicile. Even the weather was against me. It was raining and cold. I was compelled to remain overnight in jail in my wet clothes 6and that was the start of my sickness."

    Milan Glumac was born as a proletarian and as such he died. After his death the newspaper Radnicka Straza did not possess the pugnacity it had under his editorship.

    Glory be to his proletarian work and honor to his ashes!

    An Old Comrade.

    It was in the year 1907, at the time of the great crisis which shook capitalist America, that many predicted a revolution of the masses. In those times a small ...

    Croatian
    II B 2 d 1, I E, III H
  • Reform Advocate -- January 03, 1925
    (No headline)

    Jacob Schnadig, pioneer business man died on December 25. He was born in Heddernheim, Germany. He came to the United States in 1866 and settled in Chicago, where he engaged in the boot and shoe business.

    He was one of the organizers of the Associated Jewish Charities, and at one time president of the Young Men's Associated Jewish Charities. He was also an ex-president of the Standard Club, and was president of K.A.M. Congregation.

    Jacob Schnadig, pioneer business man died on December 25. He was born in Heddernheim, Germany. He came to the United States in 1866 and settled in Chicago, where he engaged ...

    Jewish
    IV, III B 2, II D 1, II A 2