The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Daily Jewish Courier -- January 01, 1924
    Building Activities

    Max Miller intends to build a stone-front and pressed-brick garage building on Clark Street near Grace Street, at an estimated cost of $30,000. Hugo Liberman, 77 West Washington Street, is the architect.

    Edward Levin, 458 North Western Avenue, intends to build a three-story hotel at 5107 Kenmore Avenue at an estimated cost of $165,000.

    Kurt Levy and Company, sausage casings dealers, intend to build a warehouse and office building at Hamilton Avenue and Pershing Road, at an estimated cost of $75,000. I. Spraf and Company, 2001 Roosevelt Road, are the contractors.

    Henry Goldblatt, 139 South Crawford Avenue, intends to build a four-apartment building at 515-33 North Homan Avenue at an estimated cost of $100,000.

    2

    M. Rifkin intends to build two apartment buildings at 2615-2621 North Ridgeway Avenue. Daniel Schaffner, 64 West Randolph Street, is the architect. The cost is estimated at $75,000.

    Max Miller intends to build a stone-front and pressed-brick garage building on Clark Street near Grace Street, at an estimated cost of $30,000. Hugo Liberman, 77 West Washington Street, is ...

    Jewish
    II F, II A 2
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- January 01, 1924
    Real-Estate Transfers

    Harry Leviton and Anna Flat sold the nine-flat building located on the corner of Douglas Boulevard and Central Park Avenue to Sadie and Anna Petrofsky for $53,000.

    Max Novak bought the building located on the northeast corner of 16th Street and Ridgeway Avenue for $63,250. The building has seven stores and two flats. The attorneys negotiating the transaction were J. Rosenstein and Charles Goodman.

    Mount Sinai Hospital bought the property located at California Avenue and 15th Street fron N. Poznanski for $23,000. The Hospital is to build a nursery home on the site.

    S. Schuchman bought the property located at 1566 South Avers Avenue from 2D. Kaplan for approximately $34,000.

    Meyer Abrams bought the property located at 1406 South Independence Boulevard from N. Schwartz, for approximately $36,000.

    B. Mazep bought the property located at 1519-1521 North Central Park Avenue for $33,500.

    D. N. Goldberg sold the property located at Ogden Avenue and Van Buren Street to L. Strauss for $24,500.

    I. Goldman bought the property located at Mozart and Fillmore for $18,000.

    J. Weinstein bought the property located at Division Street and Hoyne Avenue from H. Goldstein for $12,500.

    3

    B. Azenberg bought the property located on the southeast corner of Francisco Avenue and Augusta Boulevard for $35,000.

    B. Lipman bought a half interest in the property located at Ogden and St. Louis Avenues from A. Axelrod for an undisclosed price.

    B. Cohen bought the property located at 1547 South Spaulding Avenue from D. Goldstein for approximately $20,000.

    R. Arkin bought the property located at 2839-2845 West North Avenue from M. Rosenbaum for $72,000 cash.

    S. Handwerker bought the property at 2753 Augusta from I. Neiman for $28,000.

    L. S. Gordon bought the property located at Chicago and Hamlin Avenues from M. Wilner for $10,000.

    4

    K. Budinsky bought the property located at the northwest corner of Congress Street and Springfield Avenue for $37,000 cash.

    H. E. Honoroff bought the property located at Grenshaw Street and Central Park Avenue for $25,800.

    B. Saxe sold the property located on the northeast corner of Jackson Boulevard and St. Louis Avenue for $28,000 cash.

    A. Lipman bought the property located at Springfield Avenue and Roosevelt Road from B. Herlich for approximately $20,000.

    J. Setin bought the property located at 3524-3526 West 13th Place from J. Edelman for $31,500

    S. Sherman sold the property located at Clifton Park Avenue and 16th Street to 5N. Karkofsky for approximately $25,000.

    Samuel Epstein bought the property located on the southeast corner of Roosevelt Road and Lawndale Avenue from J. Counselman for $79,000.

    Samuel Freeman bought two thirds and Julius Snitkowsky one third of the property located at 1832-42 North Humboldt Boulevard for $250,000. Attorneys Shulman, Shulman,and Abrams negotiated the transaction.

    The Central Park Theater on Roosevelt Road was transferred to the Balaban and Katz corporation for $688,000.

    H. Goldstone sold the property located at Fulton Street and Kedzie Avenue for $12,500.

    J. Tanenbaum bought the property located on the southwest corner of Hamlin 6Avenue and Fulton Street for $48,900.

    H. Goldberg sold the property located on the northeast corner of Chicago and Springfield Avenues for $10,500 cash.

    Emil Stein bought an interest in the property located at 5107 Kenmore from E. Levin for $10,000.

    J. Rosenberg sold the property located at 4944 Troy Street to Ida Glitzky for $26,750.

    Wolf Leiboff bought the property located at 4730-4742 Whipple Street from Morris Lazar for $225,500.

    Meyer Wasserman bought the property located at 3817 Wrightwood Avenue from Jennie Rifkin for $28,000.

    7

    Esther Zechman bought the property located at 3808 to 3810 Montrose Avenue from Sol H. Rubin for $37,000.

    Isidore and Abraham Shapiro bought the property located on the corner of Montrose Avenue and Mozart Street from Wolf Feirstein et. al. for $94,583.

    Meyer Goldberg bought the eighteen-flat building on the southeast corner of Albany and Sunnyside Avenues for $80,000. J. Puletz was the broker.

    R. Fishman sold the property located at 4941-43 Prairie Avenue for $55,000.

    Sam Levy bought the property located on the southwest corner of Langley Avenue and 46th Street for $16,500 cash.

    Max Kaplan bought the property located at 4249-53 Cottage Grove Avenue for $30,000 cash.

    8

    Louis L. Cohen bought the property located on the southeast corner of 50th Street and Forrestville Avenue for $56,000, and resold it to Sam Harris.

    Leon Goldfarb sold the property located at 5450-64 Kimbark Avenue for $122,150.

    Sam Rosenthal and Morris Zevin bought the building containing thirty-four flats and seven stores, located on the southwest corner of Washington Boulevard and Cicero Avenue, from Joseph Zelitzky and Morris Lemberg for $265,000. Kaplow and Abelman of the Independence Bank Building were the brokers, and Shulman, Shulman, and Sam Kolender were the attorneys.

    David Gutman bought the six-flat building located at 1349 East 53rd Street from Max Wintrich for $43,000. H. Eckselson was the broker.

    Israel Pearlman bought the business property, a seven-story building, located 9at 314-316 South Franklin Street for $410,000. Miltenberg and Mitel were the brokers, and S. Leder, of the law firm Lewis, Adler, Leder, and Adler, represented Mr. Pearlman.

    Morris Baronchik bought the business building located on the southwest corner of Prairie Avenue and 58th Street from Isaac Gitler for $104,000. Mr. Gitler bought this building a few weeks ago for $95,000.

    Rebecca Kirsch bought the property located on the southeast corner of Diversey and Ashland Avenues from Meyer Bronstein and J. Meyers for $55,000. The property consists of two buildings, one containing three flats and a store, the other containing five flats.

    Morris Brown and Elias Arkules bought the twenty-eight-flat building located at Lunt Avenue and Finger Street [sic] for $165,000.

    10

    Jacob Ginsburg acquired the store and flat building located on the southeast corner of State and 50th Streets in exchange for a business building on the southwest side.

    Jacob Rabinowitz bought the seventeen-flat building located on the southeast corner of Jackson Boulevard and St. Louis Avenue for $137,000.

    A. Wolfson bought the property located on the northwest corner of Western and Lexington Avenues for $34,000 cash.

    D. Bernstein bought the property located at Fullerton and Sacramento Avenues from W. Lavterman for $14,500.

    Morris Horwitz bought the property located on the southwest corner of Elston and Fullerton Avenues from M. Rubin for $25,500 cash.

    Harry Leviton and Anna Flat sold the nine-flat building located on the corner of Douglas Boulevard and Central Park Avenue to Sadie and Anna Petrofsky for $53,000. Max Novak bought ...

    Jewish
    II F, II A 2
  • Forward -- January 01, 1924
    An Interview with the Famous Author Israel Zangwill

    "Which country do you believe is most suitable for Jews to colonize at present in the event that America closes its doors to immigrants?"

    This was one of the many questions I asked the great Jewish author who is now visiting in Chicago.

    The serious philosophic face of the tall, slender, grey Mr. Zangwill became even more serious for a moment.

    "It is a very interesting question," he said, sitting himself calmly in a soft revolving chair. "I could name you many territories where Jews could emigrate, settle, and get complete autonomy, but the trouble is that at the present moment the world Judaism possesses no interest to supply a Jewish territory. From Europe every Jew strives to come to America, and here in America, every Jew thinks, that so long as he sends money to help the suffering Jews in Europe, his duty is completely fulfilled.

    2

    They are afraid to take up the question of a rest place for Jews on a large scale, a question which must be taken up."

    "What territories would you recommend for Jewish immigrants, in case the question of migration on a large scale, which you have in mind, is taken up?"

    "Well, there is a country, Siberia, where Jews can settle and fortify themselves and establish full national and autonomy rights. In South America, there are plenty of opportunities and places for Jewish immigration and colonization. In Brazil, there are strips of land that are suitable for Jewish country. There are many more places on the globe where Jews could settle, and in a short time feel no different than in America.

    "What would you give as a reason, for the leaders and Jewish welfare workers in Europe not taking up the question of the territories you mentioned?"

    3

    "The reason, my friend," he told me, "is because our Jewish welfare workers fear open discussion of the problem that no nation can exist if it has no country to rule independently; this does not necessarily mean that Palestine alone must be the country able to maintain the existence of the Jews as a nation. Every territory can turn out the same. The only thing necessary is to face the truth and work up courage enough to say to yourself, 'The Jews must have their own territory,' and then the question as to whether or not America will admit immigrants is not so important."

    "Do you say that because in a country like America there are no special territories where the future existence of the Jews would be assured?"

    "When you ask me about the future of the Jews in America, I will say that my opinion always was that America is a melting-pot.

    "All immigrants entering America must assimilate either partially or completely. I held this opinion before I came to America and I am still in the same frame of mind."

    4

    And Zangwill is of the conviction that all Jews living in America will in time assimilate with the Americans in the general melting-pot.

    "It is just a question of how long it will take before America will completely bar immigrants, and bring the process of assimilation to an end," he added.

    Zangwill is under the impression that in New York the process of assimilation will last somewhat longer, in smaller cities where there are less Jews than in New York, the same process of assimilation will take place much sooner, but it must take place. "It is already taking place; take the young Jewish generation, you will see that they are not only far from comprehending Jewish problems but they cannot even speak Jewish," he pointed out.

    "But do you know of the movement that certain Jewish organizations in America have organized, for the building of Jewish schools in which the young Jewish children can learn Jewish?" I asked Zangwill.

    5

    He replied that he knows, and that he does not believe that it will keep the young American Jewish generation from assimilating.

    Such special schools, Zangwill claims, will certainly be able to do something for Jewish education and training; but to our sorrow, they exist in an abnormal condition and in subnormal circumstances.

    In order that a school may give the child a correct education and training, the child must spend at least four or five hours a day in school. "But what," says Zangwill, "do we see in the American Jewish schools? When do they teach the children there? Not until they come home from the American public schools, and then for only an hour or two. It is evident that the influence of Jewish schools on the child, cannot exceed the influence of the public schools.

    "Particularly when one class of people tries to live in the same neighborhood and atmosphere of another class, the people of the first class cannot help but assimilate. This is my opinion, and it will surely work out that way with American Judaism in the near future."

    6

    "Have you anything to say in reference to the Jewish Congress in America?"

    "The Jewish Congress in America was not a Jewish Congress - but a Zionist Congress. The Zionists have instilled real Zionistic propaganda into it; therefore it cannot be called a Jewish Congress."

    Zangwill came to Chicago in connection with his new comedy "We, Moderns," which is being presented this week for the first time in Chicago, at the Blackstone theatre.

    "You understand," he added, "this comedy is not Jewish and yet it is Jewish. It is a production without Jews, but with specific 'critical spirit' that only we Jews possess."

    "Which country do you believe is most suitable for Jews to colonize at present in the event that America closes its doors to immigrants?" This was one of the many ...

    Jewish
    III G, III A, I A 1 a, II B 2 f
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- January 01, 1924
    The Zionist Convention (Editorial)

    The second annual Zionist convention of the Middle West opens today at 10 A. M. at the LaSalle Hotel. The indications are that the convention will accomplish great things and will arouse new Zionist energy in the Middle West. The [news of the] successful membership drive in Chicago will spread over the whole Middle West as a result of the convention which is being attended by delegates from sixty cities. Just as the drive in Chicago quadrupled the Zionist energies of the city, so a membership drive in the Middle West will increase the Zionist activities of that area. The membership drive in other cities can be successful and the convention can supply the enthusiasm necessary for the drive.

    The New York leaders are astonished at the latest success of the Zionist work in Chicago. They did not credit Chicago with so much energy. They know very well that Chicago will show the way for the whole Middle West. It is not sheer 2boasting on our part when we say that Chicago and the Middle West can enroll as many members in three months as all other parts of the country put together. There is no reason to assume that the success of the work in Chicago must remain an isolated instance. The Zionist avalanche that is now taking place in Chicago must take place in all Jewish communities within a radius of two hundred miles from Chicago. This means that our leaders in New York will have to consider us as the biggest factor in American Zionism and they will have either to share the leadership with us or make such strenuous efforts in New York that they will become numerically stronger than Chicago and the Middle West. Should the former be the case, Chicago will become the most important center of Zionism in America. In the latter case, New York will become four times as strong as it is now, which will give American Zionism an entirely different aspect and which will cause new forces to rise to the surface.

    However important the convention is for Chicago, it is still more important for the Zionist development of the Middle West. Thousands of new members were enrolled during the membership drive. A great many new districts were organized, 3and in each district there was organized an executive committee of men and women who are new to the work. Many of them are not acquainted with the methods of Zionist work. Others are not even acquainted with Zionist institutions. Years may pass before these new forces will gain [the necessary] knowledge and experience in these complicated and delicate affairs. We cannot wait that long. We need a group of new workers right now who are acquainted with the work and who know what must be done. They will learn more at the convention in two days than they could learn from their routine work in two years. From this standpoint, the convention is a large and splendid school for Zionist work.

    The Zionist movement must be put upon such a basis that it will be able to raise money for the Keren Hayesod ["exchequer" of World Zionist Organization] without resorting to official drives. The drives tire us out and take up too much of our energy. The yearly drives will become superfluous and the Keren Hayesod will have the funds necessary to go on with its work without the aid of special campaigns, when there are twenty-five thousand well-organized Zionists in the 4Middle West, who know what their duty is to Palestine. The convention can lay the foundation for an organization of twenty-five thousand Zionists in the Middle West. The convention can give an impetus to the organizational work; it can create the necessary enthusiasm for the work in all middle western states, which would help the Keren Hayesod in a definite way.

    It is to be regretted that the convention has no cultural and social program because, after all, one must remember that although it is easy to enroll new members in the organization, it is still easier to lose them if they are not involved in some phase of the work which will sustain their interest in the movement.

    It is not yet too late. The convention starts today and the leaders of the convention starts today and the leaders of the convention can still make good their mistake. They should take care that new members grow up with the organization and that they are given something of a spiritual and social value. We hope that the convention will be able to create the necessary means by which we will be 5able to hold on to our new achievements.

    This is the first time that a Zionist convention of great importance to American Zionism, has been held in Chicago. [Translator's note: The last four lines of the editorial could not be translated as they are half torn and words are missing.]

    The second annual Zionist convention of the Middle West opens today at 10 A. M. at the LaSalle Hotel. The indications are that the convention will accomplish great things and ...

    Jewish
    III B 4, II D 10
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- January 02, 1924
    The "Ford-Ward" Strike Was an Interesting Lesson by A. Hamerman

    [Translator's note: The author of this article calls the Jewish newspaper Forward "Ford-Ward" because it printed advertisements of Henry Ford, an enemy of the Jews.]

    How does the Jewish saying go? It is a pleasure to whip an arrogant, boastful man. It is a pleasure to see the whipped one boasting of his powers yet occasionally touching with his hand that part of his body that hurts.

    We observe now a similar spectacle. There was a strike against the "Ford-Ward" on Saturday, Sunday, and Monday. It is very seldom that a strike is as magnificently successful as this one. It is even unnecessary to talk 2about it. The "Ford-Ward," however, claims that there was no strike.

    This is not a bluff. If a person who has been beaten up until he is black and blue, stands before you and claims that nothing has happened to him, you won't call him a liar. Either you will pity him or you will say that he fully deserves the beating he received. Both reactions are aroused by the "Ford-Ward" strike.

    It was very amusing to look at yesterday's issue of the "Ford-Ward". On the front page there was a big announcement that Sunday's issue was distributed yesterday to all the newspaper stands. The "Ford-Ward" thus admits that the strike was so successful that the "Ford-Ward" was compelled to sell the Sunday issue on Tuesday. This is the first time in the history of daily newspapers that such a thing has happened. It hurts, but what can one do about it?

    3

    It seems, however, that the implications of that statement were not lost upon the "Ford-Ward". To offset that implication, the "Ford-Ward" declares that its Sunday issue was sold so fast that it had to reprint it on Tuesday. Is that so? This is very interesting. Why then was that edition reprinted on Tuesday and not on Monday? Was it because on Monday the strike was still on? Then you admit that there was a strike, then how could the Sunday edition be sold out? This is very funny.

    Another thing: Greetings to the "Ford-Ward" jubilee from its own staff were printed on the first page of the Sunday edition, which we obtained only yesterday. The same greetings were reprinted in yesterday's, Tuesday's, edition. It is easy to understand why this was done. Nobody had seen the Sunday edition, and, of course, nobody will buy a Sunday edition on Tuesday. That is why the "Ford-Ward" had to reprint on Tuesday what it had already printed on Sunday.

    4

    The "Ford-Ward" answers by declaring that the strike was an unsuccessful conspiracy against the labor movement. "Today," proudly declares the "Ford-Ward", "the Forward will be again on sale at all the stands." It granted the strikers everything they demanded, so it is again on the stands. What, therefore, is there to be triumphant about?

    There is another element, besides comedy, present here. The "Ford-Ward" always liked to shroud itself in the mantle of the labor movement. Even when it accepted the Ford advertisements, it had in mind the labor movement. Very likely, it has some peculiar ideas about the labor movement. We will talk about that later. But in the present case, in the strike of the newsboys union against the "Ford-Ward", it is simply idiotic to drag in the labor movement. Will the poor news dealers, who need bread for themselves and their families, break the labor movement? Will they break the labor movement by striking against the Forward, whose treatment of them is worse than that of a bad boss? The contrary would seem to be true.

    5

    However, one should not be too severe with the "Ford-Ward". Everything is far from well with it. First of all, the shame of it: a strike has been declared against it, a "socialist" newspaper, and it has had to employ scabs. Second, the damage: for three full days no one would buy it and even scabs did not help. Third, there was the even greater wound that it had to give in to the demands of the strikers. One, therefore, should be indulgent with the "Ford-Ward" when it tries to throw dust into the public eye, and thereby makes itself the laughingstock of the people whom it has always regarded as fools. Everybody in Chicago understands the situation now: the strike was conducted by poor workers who slave twelve or fifteen hours a day in all kinds of bad weather; they conducted the strike against the "Ford-Ward" leaders, who are as opulent as though they were the directors of a very rich corporation. The strike was declared by a legal union, which has a charter from the American Federation of Labor. To say under these circumstances that some people wanted to use the strike to break the labor movement, is the height of idiocy.

    6

    Who represents the labor movement if not the unions? Well, did the newsboys union conspire against itself?

    It is now clear to everybody that had the corpulent bosses of the "socialist" newspaper granted the few pennies' raise demanded by its poor workers, there would have been no attempt made to "break the labor movement". The entire dispute was only with regard to the few pennies' raise, and the "Ford-Ward" by its idle chatter about conspiracy and intrigues just makes a fool of itself.

    The "Ford-Ward" has a peculiar conception of what the labor movement is and this explains the whole situation. In its silly statement of yesterday, the "Ford-Ward" says: "The Chicago labor leaders met the attack," and so on. Here you have the root of all the trouble! The "Ford-Ward" doesn't mean the workers, but the leaders of the workers, particularly the leaders who are on its payroll, or lick its boots. This is what the "Ford-Ward" calls the labor 7movement! This explains everything! The "Ford-Ward" knows that the workers themselves, the tailors, the cloakmakers, the dressmakers, drove away the scabs who tried to sell the "Ford-Ward". It knows that it did not receive one bit of help from the workers themselves.

    [Translator's note: The author of this article calls the Jewish newspaper Forward "Ford-Ward" because it printed advertisements of Henry Ford, an enemy of the Jews.] How does the Jewish saying ...

    Jewish
    I D 2 a 4, I E, I D 2 a 2, II B 2 d 1
  • Svenska Tribunen-Nyheter -- January 02, 1924
    Real-Estate Transaction

    Mr. C. A. Carlson, the well-known builder, bought the property on the northwest corner of Dearborn and Maple Streets for $100,000. Mr. N. C. Anderson, of Crowe Brothers & Company, was the broker. Mr. Carlson is planning to build a large eight-story apartment building on the site.

    Mr. C. A. Carlson, the well-known builder, bought the property on the northwest corner of Dearborn and Maple Streets for $100,000. Mr. N. C. Anderson, of Crowe Brothers & Company, ...

    Swedish
    II F, II A 2
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- January 02, 1924
    "Palestine Will Be a Jewish Land Despite All Enemy Attacks" Says Dr. Weizmann Zionist Leader Greets Opening of Middle West Convention in La Salle Hotel

    "Palestine will be a Jewish land, and all the complaints against England and against the Zionist organization are no more than idle chatter. Three years ago we owned only two per cent of the land of Palestine; today we own not less than four per cent. As one travels from Tarbiah to Jaffa one passes through Jewish land, bought and cultivated by the Jews.

    "We now have enough money to buy land for eight thousand families. In the course of time, twenty-five thousand Jews will settle on that land. I admit that the path to our goal is a difficult one and that the road is strewn with rocks but we are clearing the way, which is a much more difficult task than throwing stones, as our enemies are doing. I hope to God that this convention will help to clear many rocks from the path."

    2

    Dr. Chaim Weizmann delivered this brief speech yesterday afternoon before the audience gathered in the convention hall of the La Salle Hotel. He spoke in a very serious tone and one could see by his pale face that he was very serious.

    The president of the World Zionist Organization made this speech when he greeted the second annual convention of the middle-western Zionist organization. The hall was quiet for a few moments after the conclusion of his speech. Then the audience burst into spontaneous applause; cries of "Hurrah!" and the strains of "Hatikvah" filled the hall.

    The convention opened yesterday at twelve o'clock noon. It began its routine and technical work immediately after Max Shulman, president of the middle western organization, striking the table with his small gavel, declared the convention open. When Max Shulman finished his brief opening address with the words: "Everyone to his camp and his banner," the delegates understood that this was to be a serious business convention, and refrained 3from making the hundreds of "points of order" with which a Jewish convention usually distinguishes itself.

    Mr. Shulman pointed out in his speech that Zionism had been very successful in the Middle West during the past year, in spite of all the obstacles created by internal and external enemies. He urged the delegates to keep on working for the holy ideal, which demands so many sacrifices of men and money. The president of the middle-western Zionist organization assured the delegates that Chicago will fulfill its quota in the membership drive, and that Chicago's quota of the Keren Hayesod ["exchequer" of World Zionist Organization] will also be fulfilled.

    The Chicago Zionist district has five thousand members now. New districts and new members are enrolled every day, thanks to the energetic work of Dr. Abramowich, secretary of the district.

    Immediately after Mr. Shulman's speech, Leonard J. Grossman greeted the 4convention in the name of the Chicago Zionists. In the main, Mr. Grossman dealt with Zangwill's recent statements against the present Zionist leaders and against political Zionism, and reprimanded the great English-Jewish writer for his statements. "Israel Zangwill is creating a lot of publicity for Israel Zangwill, but he is doing very little for the Jews"." With this remark, Mr. Grossman concluded his greetings. The first session ended with Mr. Grossman's speech. The various committees immediately began their work.

    The second session opened at two o'clock in the afternoon. The credentials committee reported that there were one hundred seventy-one delegates at the convention, of whom one hundred twenty-one were from Chicago and the rest from neighboring communities.

    Mr. M. Steinberg, chairman of the National Fund Committee, brought in a very encouraging report. He declared that thirty-five hundred National 5Fund boxes were placed in Chicago about a year ago and that four months later they brought in three thousand six hundred dollars. He also declared that sixteen thousand dollars was collected in Chicago in 1923 for the National Fund; this is seven thousand dollars more than in 1922.

    The convention then turned its attention to the task of electing the officers of the convention. Max Shulman was unanimously elected chairman. Dr. Fink of Terre Haute, [Indiana], Robert Hess of Milwaukee, [Wisconsin], and L. D. Grossman were unanimously elected vice-chairman, and B. Hodes was elected secretary.

    Saul Raskin, the poet, made an appeal in behalf of Zionist work. The ninety-year-old, white-haired Joseph Szold, an uncle of Henrietta Szold, made a deep impression in his brief speech appealing for aid to Palestine.

    Mr. Ben Zion Soloveichik of Poltava, [Russia], one of the oldest Russian 6Zionists, was an unexpected but welcome guest. He left Russia a short time ago. He moved everybody to tears with his description of the present condition of the Jews in Russia. He said that the Russian Jews made sacrifices and fulfilled their Zionist duties during the worst days of the terrible Cheka. The worst cruelties of the Cheka and the Euseks did not prevent the Russian Jews from doing their Zionist duty; even now many of them are in prisons, martyrs of the holy, Jewish ideal.

    Louis Lipsky, president of the American Zionist Federation, and member of the World Executive Committee, received a warm welcome in appreciation of his great achievements in the field of Zionist work. Lipsky, who had returned from a tour of the Middle West, declared that not only Jewish minds but Jewish hearts had been affected by the attacks which the enemies of the Jews have recently made against them. He said that the American Jews are prone to forget that they are responsible for seventy-one per cent of the Palestine budget. Mr. Lipsky made an appeal in 7behalf of the National Fund. His powerful speech was enthusiastically received.

    The third session began with a report by Dr. Abramowich on Zionist work in Iowa, Wisconsin, Illinois, and Indiana. There are twenty-five hundred members in Chicago. The original six districts have grown to thirty-two. Eleven thousand dollars in dues was sent to the main office in New York.

    Max Shulman devoted his closing speech, during the third session to the wonderful work of the Courier in behalf of Zionism and Judaism in the Middle West. He said that the Courier deserves special thanks from the midwestern Jews for its fight for everything that is Jewish, and that Mr. [P.] Ginsburg and Dr. [S. M.] Melamed deserve a song of praise from American Jewry.

    The Hadassah of Chicago and the neighboring states also held a convention, 8in connection with the convention of the middle western Zionists. Forty women came together and discussed, in an intelligent and reasonable manner, their share of Zionist work. Mrs. Dushkin, who has recently returned from Palestine, gave a very encouraging report on Hadassah work in Palestine, which is not political but is purely humanitarian. During the afternoon, the delegates were the guests of Hadassah at a luncheon in the La Salle Hotel. Mrs. Stein, Miss Pearl Franklin, and Miss Perlstein entertained the guests appropriately and beautifully.

    In the evening, all the local delegates, as well as the delegates from other cities, were guests of the Chicago Central Zionist Committee at a banquet at the La Salle Hotel, where Chicago's five thousand new members were installed.

    Mr. Harry A. Lipsky was toastmaster. He complimented himself, in a brief 9but humorous speech, upon the success of the Zionist drive and assured his listeners that the drive was a success because of his inactivity!

    Daniel Dever, son of Mayor Dever, brought a message from his father who could not be present at the banquet. He promised Zionism his full support.

    Dr. S. M. Melamed, in a powerful speech, exposed the falsity of those who claim that Zionism is a dogma. Zionism, declared Dr. Melamed, is not a dogma but a conviction based upon fact. The Jews are hated because they have no country. It is the task of the Zionists to obtain the Jewish land for the Jewish people. A Jewish home in Palestine will unite the Eastern and Western cultures.

    The new members were then installed by Mr. Louis Lipsky, president of the American Zionist Federation, who delivered a long speech, which 10was very favorably received. Between speeches, the choir, directed by David Hirsch, sang beautiful Jewish songs.

    "Palestine will be a Jewish land, and all the complaints against England and against the Zionist organization are no more than idle chatter. Three years ago we owned only two ...

    Jewish
    III B 4, IV, I K, III H, II D 10, II B 2 d 1
  • Svenska Tribunen-Nyheter -- January 02, 1924
    Building Activities

    H. J. Olson, architect, has prepared the drawings for two apartment buildings which Mills & Sons will erect at 5832-52 and 5900-60 Cortland Street at an estimated total cost of $224,000.

    Mills and Sons have also obtained permits for the erection of four large apartment buildings in the Austin district, at 1800-40 North Mansfield Avenue, 1801-41 North Mayfield Avenue, 1801-41 Mason Avenue, and at 1801-41 North Austin Avenue. The cost of each building is estimated at $98,000. H. J. Olson, architect, has prepared the drawings.

    N. J. Peterson will erect an apartment building at 3501-11 North Springfield Avenue at an estimated cost of $30,000. G. E. Pearson is the architect.

    H. J. Olson, architect, has prepared the drawings for two apartment buildings which Mills & Sons will erect at 5832-52 and 5900-60 Cortland Street at an estimated total cost of ...

    Swedish
    II F, II A 2
  • Svenska Tribunen-Nyheter -- January 02, 1924
    Entering a New Year (Editorial)

    The beginning of a new calendar year marks an important milestone in the history of a newspaper. Just as for the individual, so for the newspaper the occasion is one for serious reflection on the part of the editorial staff and, we may well say, on the part of our readers as well. It reminds us that Father Time moves along, not with great speed perhaps, but steadily, and with-out ever retracing his steps. And he pulls us along with him, whether we want to go or not.

    It is of the utmost importance that, as time passes, we absorb and make our own some of the new impulses which each new year brings with it so that we do not stop growing, so that we do not become lost in the past. This applies even more to a newspaper, whose task it is to reflect truly contemporary ideas, ambitions, and spiritual as well as material activities, and to lead the way toward that which is right and good.

    2

    The Svenska Tribunen-Nyheter has already passed the half-century mark, but is still vigorous as a youngster, and its zest for life has increased with every passing year. It has not remained stationary, nor has it become solidified in old, stereotyped forms; and just as its plant equipment and external appearance have kept step with modern trends, so also have its contents mirrored the social evolution and progress which are always going on, as well as the highest ideals of the day. To sum it up, the Svenska Tribunen-Nyheter has tried to be what a publication should be which wants to be a spokesman for sound public opinion.

    The Svenska Tribunen-Nyheter was the first Swedish newspaper here to take up the modern ideas of social progress and reform, and to propound them vigorously. The driving force behind its efforts in this respect has been its sincere interest in the welfare of the people, and its intense dislike of everything that tends to ussurp the fundamental, God-given rights of man. Our readers 3have not failed to recognize this basic policy and progressive spirit in our columns, and the many expressions of encouragement and good will which we receive almost daily testify to the fact that the Swedish public appreciates a liberal progressive newspaper which is not afraid of new ideas, which supports useful reforms, and which always looks out for the people's interests in the solution of the intricate social problems of our times.

    The Swedes have always been praised for their sterling qualities as citizens, and the people of no nationality in this country have earned more respect than they have for loyalty, devotion to duty, honesty, and ability as workers. We are proud of this, and the Tribunen-Nyheter wants to be a Swedish standard bearer urging all its nationals carefully to preserve the culture and traditions they have inherited from their fathers and brought with them to their new home here, to transplant these customs and traditions to American soil, and to help them grow and bear rich fruit, to the honor of the old fatherland and for the material and spiritual benefit of the new fatherland. We desire to be 4valuable citizens of America, and to contribute to her progress.

    The Svenska Tribunen-Nyheter will remain true to its best traditions, and will always try to maintain its position as the foremost Swedish-American newspaper, whose comments on political, social, and other questions are read with interest and approval in Swedish-American homes throughout the land. As before, we shall bring our readers the latest news from all parts of Sweden, news concerning our countrymen in America, general American and world news, good serials and short stories, and also special articles by the best Swedish writers both in this country and abroad. Our special departments will continue as usual.

    During the past year, we received many tokens of appreciation from our readers, and we are happy to announce that our subscription list is growing steadily. Indications are that it will keep on growing. It may be a surprise to many to hear that some six thousand copies go to Sweden every week.

    5

    This happy situation is chiefly due to the mutual good will and confidence between ourselves and our public, and we take this occasion to thank every-body whose co-operation has made our success and progress possible. Looking forward to a continued pleasant association, we wish all our readers and occasional contributors, our friends and supporters, near and far,

    A Happy New Year!

    The beginning of a new calendar year marks an important milestone in the history of a newspaper. Just as for the individual, so for the newspaper the occasion is one ...

    Swedish
    II B 2 d 1, III A
  • Forward -- January 02, 1924
    Workmen's Circle Organizes New Choir Which Is Rapidly Developing

    The new choir organized last week by the educational committee of the Workmen's Circle, one of Chicago's largest Jewish organizations, is on a very good basis. It is rapidly developing with much success.

    Friend Paul Lemkoff, the well-known composer and musician, who is well-experienced in organizing and directing choirs of adults, was invited as director of the Workmen's Circle Choir. Registrations of new members in the choir can be made at the office of the educational committee, 1224 S. Albany Avenue.

    Members of the choir will not only learn singing but will also be taught to read notes in order to acquaint themselves with the theory of music.

    The new choir organized last week by the educational committee of the Workmen's Circle, one of Chicago's largest Jewish organizations, is on a very good basis. It is rapidly developing ...

    Jewish
    II B 1 a