The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Daily Jewish Courier -- January 03, 1923
    In the World of Business and Finance Around and about the Contractors

    Harry Kaplan and Harry Entin obtained a contract from Joseph H. Klafter to build a two-story building at 4364 Elston Avenue. The building will contain offices and two apartments; and it will cost about $20,000.

    On the southeast corner of Milwaukee and Warner Avenues, a building of five stores, eight apartments, and six offices, will be erected at the cost of $90,000. Sam Fishkin will do the masonry, Appelman and Appelman, the carpentry, Marcus Weil, the plumbing, and the Northwestern Terra Cotta Company will supply the terra cotta.

    New One-Hundred-Thousand-Dollar Building on the Far West Side

    Philip Rosenberg took out a permit to build a two-story building of stores, 2flats, and offices at 5948-58 Roosevelt Road.

    According to the estimate, the building should cost one hundred thousand dollars. A. Bain is the architect, Husman and Williams will supply certain materials.

    At 892 North Sacramento Boulevard, M. Levin will build a three-story brick building. Lugin and Levitan are the architects.

    Harry Kaplan and Harry Entin obtained a contract from Joseph H. Klafter to build a two-story building at 4364 Elston Avenue. The building will contain offices and two apartments; and ...

    Jewish
    II F, II A 2
  • Abendpost -- January 03, 1923
    A. Klappenback Dies.

    Again a man passed away, who was most prominent among his fellow citizens and whose name is closely interwoven in the history of the German-Americans of our city. He had been a good companion and a wonderful friend to man.

    Alexander Klappenbach died January 3rd, 1924, in his home at 2140 Fremont Street. Mr. Klappenbach reached the age of sixty four years, He was born in Texas, but as a boy, he came to Chicago and in his earliest youth developed a remarkable tendency towards German literature. In later years the wholesale distribution of German literature was the foundation of his wealth and public esteem. In 1885, after several years of employment in different book stores, he founded his own business under the name of Koelling, Klappenbach and Kenkal. Three years later the firm, besides the general tasks of a book store, specialized also in the importation and selling of German literature, developed into one of the biggest and most well known of its king in America.

    In 1894 a fire destroyed his business, but, Mr. Klappenbach started the reconstruction 2of his new business, which was moved to 206 W. Randolph Street.

    About fifteen years ago Mr. Klappenbach retired. However, he preserved an active interest in art and literature and, especially, arranged for the sale of products of German-American authors, of whom many gave thanks to him in later years for their success.

    An almost complete collection of works, printed in the German language in this country, formed the particular pride of the deceased.

    Several German-American societies are obliged to him. He also was a member of several outstanding German-American societies.

    As a German-American book seller Mr. Klappenbach was a pioneer of German culture, and German art in the United States, as a person he was a man of magnificent characteristics and undefiled character. His death is indeed a great loss. Honor to his memory.

    Again a man passed away, who was most prominent among his fellow citizens and whose name is closely interwoven in the history of the German-Americans of our city. He had ...

    German
    IV, II A 2
  • Svenska Tribunen-Nyheter -- January 03, 1923
    Real-Estate Transactions

    The Chesterfield apartment building on the northwest corner of Pine Grove Avenue and Surf Street was bought by Andrew G. Johnson from Louis Brosilow for $275,000. It contains twenty-four apartments.

    Andrew G. Johnson, sold the apartment building on the northeast corner of Sheridan Road and Buena Avenue to Oscar W. Johnson for $195,000.

    The Chesterfield apartment building on the northwest corner of Pine Grove Avenue and Surf Street was bought by Andrew G. Johnson from Louis Brosilow for $275,000. It contains twenty-four apartments. ...

    Swedish
    II F, II A 2
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- January 03, 1923
    In the World of Business and Finance Among Banks

    The Liberty Trust and Savings Bank issued six per cent bonds worth three-quarter of a million dollars in sixty days. During its tenth anniversary week, the above-mentioned bank gained 4,265 new depositors, each one depositing an average of $31.

    Messrs. Braude and Superfine of the Independent State Bank announced that this year the sale of gold bonds is by far greater than last year.

    The Noel State Bank issued new bonds. The money will be used to erect a building on the corner of Montrose Avenue and Rockwell Street. Mr. James Davis is vice-president of the bank.

    Real Estate News

    Samuel Lederer sold the apartment building at 7735-7757 Sheridan Road to Edward 2Satz for the stated price of $90,000, over and above the mortgage of $80,000.

    Louis Zissman bought the thirty apartments at the southwest corner of Park and West End Avenues from Charles J. Miller for the stated price of $134,000, over and above a mortgage of $117,000.

    Rose Cohen, together with a few other people, bought the twenty-two apartment building on the northeast corner of 49th Street and Calumet Avenue from Will Davis for $144,000. Kaplan and Kaplan were the attorneys.

    Nathan Goodman took over two properties: the southeast corner of 67th Street and Blackstone Avenue, and six apartments at 6734 Clyde Avenue.....

    Simon and Samuel Strauss paid $800,000 for the northwest corner of Michigan Avenue and Roosevelt Road, which contains two, five-story buildings on a lot 100 by 171 feet. Experts expect that this corner will become one of the most valuable in Chicago.

    3

    Morris B. Rissman bought the lot on Washington Boulevard and Parkside Avenue with the intention of building ninety apartments on it. The price of the lot was $53,500.

    Abraham J. Epstein bought the Martin property, a lot 100 by 250 feet, which runs from Morgan Street to Sangamon Street, nearly 150 feet south of Madison Street. Since Mr. Epstein has also an option on the adjacent lot, he plans to erect a large garage and service station on both lots.

    Aaron A. Alexander, vice-president of Alexander Woolens Company, bought the 18 flats on the southwest corner of Magnolia and Wilson Avenues. This building was sold by the heirs of Edwin Webber for the stated price of $35,000, over and above the mortgage of $32,000. The buyer intends to improve the building. Edelson, Tennenbaum, and Kotin were the attorneys for the buyer.

    Alfred Stern and Paul Appelbaum bought the stores at 3607-11 Irving Park 4Boulevard from S. Milton Eichberg, architect. The stores have seventy-five feet of frontage. They also bought the two-story building at 3965-69 Elston Avenue.....

    Louis Zelig sold the northwest corner of Roosevelt Road and Mozart Street to J. Levin. The lot is 50 by 125 feet. The price was $26,500, over and above the mortgage of $22,000.

    Rose Cohen bought the northeast corner of 59th Street and Calumet Avenue from Will M. Davis. There are twenty-two flats, and the price is $94,000, over and above the mortgage of $47,000.....

    Greetings from Braude and Superfine

    "To the Daily Jewish Courier, Chicago: We congratulate the Courier for starting a financial section. It is one of the most important things that a publication like the Courier could have undertaken.

    5

    Braude and Superfine,

    Independent State Bank,

    Bond Department."

    Kuppenheimer Shows Great Profits

    For the year ending October 28, 1922 the Kuppenheimer Clothing Company showed a clear profit of $366,211. From this sum, however, they have not yet deducted their income tax.

    The Liberty Trust and Savings Bank issued six per cent bonds worth three-quarter of a million dollars in sixty days. During its tenth anniversary week, the above-mentioned bank gained 4,265 ...

    Jewish
    II F, II A 2, II B 2 d 1
  • Svenska Tribunen-Nyheter -- January 03, 1923
    Successful Co-Operation (Editorial)

    The United States Department of Agriculture has for some time been making a thorough study of the co-operative movement and its chances for success in this country. The chief of the Economy Bureau of the Department recently made an address in which he emphasized certain essential principles on which a sound development of the system must rest. Here are some of them:

    In the first place, it is important that every farmer who joins a co-operative undertaking should fully understand the idea on which the organization is based and its purpose, and that he should keep in mind that its turnover must be large enough to cover the cost of operation.

    2

    Many co-operative enterprises undertaken by farmers have failed because the members have not been bound by contract to make specific deliveries of their products. They may have declared themselves ready to make certain deliveries at a certain time, but when that time arrived they were unable or unwilling to fulfill their obligations.

    Furthermore, it is of the utmost importance that the business be managed by capable men and that bookkeeping and accounting be properly done. When details of organization and Methods of operation have become well systematized, and the business is running smoothly, it is in many instances unnecessary to hire outside help.

    The official in question declared that whenever a co-operative enterprise has failed, the causes were, as a rule, to be found in lack of adherence to one or more of these basic principles. To adopt sound business methods 3is just as imperative for an undertaking of this kind as it is for any other business venture.

    The United States Department of Agriculture has for some time been making a thorough study of the co-operative movement and its chances for success in this country. The chief of ...

    Swedish
    I D 2 b, I L
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- January 04, 1923
    A Hebrew Club in Chicago

    Through the initiative of Dr. Abramovitz, M. Mlotok, and Ben David, a Hebrew club has been organized in Chicago. The purpose of this club will be to attract young men and women who are able to speak Hebrew and who are interested in reviving the Hebrew spoken word. The club will also plan social affairs for those who are interested in giving their spare time for national, Hebrew activities.

    The first organization meeting will be held Sunday at the clubrooms of the Adath Bnai Israel, 1552 South Turner Avenue. All young men and women who are able to speak Hebrew are requested to come.

    Through the initiative of Dr. Abramovitz, M. Mlotok, and Ben David, a Hebrew club has been organized in Chicago. The purpose of this club will be to attract young men ...

    Jewish
    II B 1 d, III A, III E
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- January 04, 1923
    Fundamental Rights of Children

    The rearing of children is expensive. Parents know full well how costly it is. Notwithstanding this fact, children are assets, not liabilities. There are few parents who would say that their children are not worth the amount they cost. If parents are unable, for whatever reasons, to provide for their children, and this obligation falls upon the community, the children are still assets to the community. Conditions in society are not always what they should be. Ill-health shortens the lives of many, and illiteracy limits the working capabilities of others. Crime and immorality imperil the social order, and society is responsible for this. But the future generation furnishes fresh material which can be shaped in accordance with society's needs. The mistakes which we adults have made, can be rectified by our children. A few years of public attention focused upon the welfare of children, could change a society. Therefore, one can understand that the guidance and care, that children need, should be given to them not only out of kindness and humanitarianism--it is the children's right.

    2

    Every child is entitled to certain things--if a child does not receive them, society suffers. Let us briefly mention these things, and then we shall see whether society can guarantee them to every child.

    All of us agree with the most recent scientific discovery that all children are entitled to the best prenatal care, because the care of a child begins with the attention the mother gets before the child is born. They [children] have the right to enter a home which has been prepared for them. They have the right to the proper kind of nourishment, which should be given to them at the proper time: first the mother's breast, and then simple, well-selected, and well-cooked food. They have the right to a clean, well-arranged and spacious home. They have the right to sufficient fresh air and pure water, and well-heated rooms and proper clothing in cold weather. They have the right to a lot of sleep and a comfortable bed. They have the right to protection against contagious disease and the right to instruction in proper conduct. They have the right to an education in keeping with their abilities, and to good training. and influence. They have the right to play. All these 3rights are usually assured in a normal family life.

    It is unquestionably true that the child has the right to live in a home where the father can provide him with the aforementioned necessities. Most parents are willing to do everything they can for their children. The first thing that communities should do, in order that children may enjoy their rights, is to establish children's bureaus, and to prohibit the use of force upon children. One of the most important social institutions would be a health center where parents could learn how best to raise children. If a father's earnings do not allow him to provide his children with everything they need, society must come to his aid with milk stations, recreation centers, etc.

    If a father is dead or unable to work, then society must help the mother take care of her children. If both parents are dead, the child should be taken into a private home where he can be given individual attention. The child has a right to be raised by people who have watched his development and who know his nature and character. If the child is neglected and needs special treatment, 4which requires the guardianship of others, then it must be given under social supervision. To direct a children's home requires the services of an expert, who knows how to become friendly with children, and who can find out their particular desires. It is in the interests of society that every child should be placed in an environment where he can properly develop his capabilities. Therefore, the Juvenile Court, or the court which provides guardians over children, is one of the means through which society can fulfill several of its duties.

    The rearing of children is expensive. Parents know full well how costly it is. Notwithstanding this fact, children are assets, not liabilities. There are few parents who would say that ...

    Jewish
    I B 3 b
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- January 04, 1923
    Jewish People's Institute Art Club (Article in English)

    Through the initiative of a number of advanced students of art and young artists there has been formed an Art Institute Club which will meet regularly in the Art Rooms of the Jewish People's Institute, 1258 W. Taylor Street.

    With the assistance and co-operation of the Institute the Art Club is establishing a studio for independent class work and discussion on art and related topics.

    Young artists and advanced students of art are cordially invited into the fellowship and comradeship of the Club. A special meeting is announced of the present membership and all those interested to discuss the proposed program and plan of action of the Club.

    2

    The Monday afternoon class in Rhythmic and Fancy Dancing will resume its regular sessions on Monday afternoon, January 8, 1923, at 4 o'clock.

    Parents interested in registering their children for this class should call at the office of the Jewish People's Institute, 1268 W. Taylor Street or telephone Haymarket 6400.

    Through the initiative of a number of advanced students of art and young artists there has been formed an Art Institute Club which will meet regularly in the Art Rooms ...

    Jewish
    II B 1 b, II D 6, II B 2 f, II B 1 c 2
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- January 04, 1923
    The Annual Meeting of Hevrah Gomlay Hesed Shel Emeth

    The annual meeting of the Hevrah Gomlay Hesed Shel Emeth [Editor's note: Burial society for poor Jews] was held last night at the Grenshaw Street Hebrew School.

    Ex-President Frank Goldstein reported on the financial standing of the Hevrah. According to the report, the Hevrah's income for 1922, from collections, dues, donations, and other sources, totalled $8,728.04; disbursements, $8,008.10; balance in the treasury, $719.94. Included among the disbursements is the amount $3,205.91, paid for the cemetery. The Hevrah now owes $2,848.81. It possesses a tract of four acres.

    Superintendent F. Gordon reported that during the past year the Gomlay Hesed Shel Emeth accommodated eighty deceased, 37 adults and 43 children of various ages, providing them with every necessity, including shrouds.

    2

    Then Dr. M. Meyerowitz installed the newly-elected officers and the board of directors. The following are the officers: Adolph Robbin, who declined to accept the presidency again, ex-president; Harry Jacobson, president; Jacob Cohen, vice-president; F. Gordon, superintendent; S. Palmer, assistant superintendent; William Kahn, recording secretary; J. Tennenbaum, financial secretary; and L. Schiller, sergeant at arms.

    Rabbi [A.] Cardon then addressed the meeting, pointing out the importance of the Hevrah. Cantor Krasnowsky canted the prayers for the deceased.

    The annual meeting of the Hevrah Gomlay Hesed Shel Emeth [Editor's note: Burial society for poor Jews] was held last night at the Grenshaw Street Hebrew School. Ex-President Frank Goldstein ...

    Jewish
    II D 1, IV, I B 4
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- January 04, 1923
    The Jewish Educational Problem (Editorial in English)

    Many people still believe that the problem of Jewish education is a matter of schools, curriculums, system of instruction, etc. The fact of the matter is that the problem of Jewish education is primarily a problem of the Jewish family. If there is no Jewish atmosphere and no Jewish spirit prevailing in the family, no schools and no curriculums will be of any avail. A child brought up without any Jewish traditions can only acquire Hebrew as he acquires Latin. It will mean nothing more to him than the knowledge of a dead language, for if the knowledge of Hebrew alone were to make a Jewish child feel and think like a Jew, then all those non-Jewish children and non-Jewish adults who know Hebrew could be Jews, but they are not. There are hundreds of Arabic children in Palestine who speak an excellent Hebrew. They have such a mastery of the language that it is often difficult to distinguish them from non-Jewish (sic) children. They use it to perfection, but 2still they are Arabic and not Jewish children. We know of any number of Gentile scholars who know Hebrew as well as our own Hebrew scholars, but still they are not Jewish but Gentiles, and in many cases they are anti-Semites. One must thus forget the idea that Hebrew is the essential of Jewish education. It is essential to the Jewish education, but not the sole factor of the Jewish education. The greatest factor is the Jewish family. There are tens of thousands of Jewish children in Eastern Europe whose Jewish education has been much neglected and is being neglected, but still all these children will grow up to be devoted Jews. There are millions of Jews in Eastern Europe who know little about Hebrew and less about Jewish history and literature, but still they are good Jews, because they have Jewish traditions, because in the families where they have been brought up there prevailed a Jewish spirit, a typical Jewish atmosphere. When the Jewish family is no longer Jewish in the sense that it does not continue Jewish traditions, then the children of that family will not grow up to be and upon reaching the age of maturity they will not be animated by Jewish sentiments and no amount of Jewish education will change their state 3of mind. We do not under-estimate the educational and moral value of the Jewish school. We know that it is absolutely essential to a Jewish education, but it would be shortsighted to imagine that the Jewish school will do much good if there is no Jewish atmosphere prevailing in the family. The sooner our educators understand this the sooner all those concerned with the Jewish education will begin to lay stress on the value of Jewish traditions and Jewish atmosphere in the family, the better for them and the better for the Jewish children.

    Unfortunately the Jewish family in America is not the same that it has been in the Old Country. For one reason or another it has lost its traditions and the new surroundings and new conditions of life have greatly contributed to kill its original atmosphere. The old piety is gone, the old respect for age and learning is gone, the old naivate is gone, and the old valuation of matters Jewish has gone. To revive the Jewish education and to place it on a solid basis, so that it will be productive of results, necessitates the moral reconstruction of the Jewish family. Before the parents will be 4willing to give their children a Jewish education, they must first be willing to be Jews themselves. Before they continue Jewish traditions they must first keep up with Jewish traditions themselves, and we therefore believe that a sort of a Jewish revival is necessary before Jewish education in America will see better days and better results.

    How this revival is to be brought about is not for us to tell. The leaders of the community, rabbis and laymen alike, when assembled in conference to discuss this all important (sic) matter might find ways and means how to construct the Jewish family morally and spiritually, that is to say, how to bring the adults nearer to Judaism. When the adults will be brought nearer to Judaism, then the Jewish educational problem will be very much simplified. A Jew who is conscious of his Judaism, and proud of his Judaism, will be ready to make all sorts of sacrifices to give their (sic) children a Jewish education, and then there will be plenty of money to start new schools and to improve and better the old ones.

    Many people still believe that the problem of Jewish education is a matter of schools, curriculums, system of instruction, etc. The fact of the matter is that the problem of ...

    Jewish
    I B 3 b, III A, I B 4, II B 2 f