The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Forward -- January 01, 1922
    Three Years Forward in Chicago; Today We Celebrate a Holiday

    Today is the third anniversary of the Daily Jewish Forward in Chicago.

    The Forward has always had a large circle of readers and friends in Chicago. When it was decided to establish the Forward in Chicago, the Jewish public accepted the new venture with great pleasure and pride, and wished the new publication continued success.

    In the beginning, it was a rather difficult task to establish the Forward firmly.

    2

    But we can now tell all our friends and comrades, with assurance and pride, that our hardships are a thing of the past.

    The Forward has been constantly growing during the past three years, and is now fully grown. From a business standpoint, considering the number of readers and the influence of the Forward, we can say that our publication is soundly established. Not only in moral strength, but in financial standing as well.

    Three years is not such a long time. But when we look around and see what the Daily Forward has done in that time, we cannot help but admit that we are proud of our accomplishments.

    3

    Chicago has the second largest Jewish population of any city in America, and of any city in the world. For a long time, it bore the reputation of a city where vice flourished. But a radical change for the better has taken place since the advent of the Forward. With the help of pious Jews,the Forward fought against vice in the Jewish community.

    The Forward has served the public in a useful manner, by publishing latest news, interesting and educational articles, and literature written by some of the greatest Jewish writers.

    From its inception, the Forward has been, (and still is) constantly working in the interests of the Jewish working-class in Chicago. It is the organ of the labor movement of the Socialist Party, the unions, 4and the Workmen's Circle. Therefore, it is natural for it to devote its efforts, its entire power, to the [labor] movement in the great struggle between capital and labor - the struggle between those who do nothing and have everything, and those who do all the work and have nothing.

    In this great struggle, the aim of the Forward is to help abolish the present fetid social system that spells poverty, disease, misery, war, etc. At this moment, while these lines are about to go to press, the cloak-makers of Chicago are rejoicing over the results of their first victory.

    When we first intended to expand, we pointed out that the New York Forward had many readers long before the Chicago Forward was established. The latter is now a branch of the New York Forward.

    5

    The 25th anniversary of the New York Forward will be celebrated on the same date. A quarter of a century has shown the accomplishment of a few hundred Jews who contributed from their meagre earnings in order to organize a newspaper, that would not belong to any private individual and would not constitute a business for private profiteering.

    The Forward is intended to be the exclusive organ of the working-class, a powerful weapon in the struggle for everything that is right and just. In the course of twenty-five years, the Forward has grown to be the largest, the best, and the most influential Jewish newspaper in the world.

    At the end of this quarter century the Forward has also found a field in Chicago, a field so large and powerful that the success is much greater 6than expected. Today marks the New Year! The birthday of the Forward coincides with the first day of our New Year. When this issue is being taken off the press, horns will sound, bells will ring, and people, with mixed feelings of joy and regret, will bid farewell to the old year. A new year is being born, and with the new year, new hopes, new dreams, and new desires are also being born.

    We wish you success during the new year. We wish the workers luck and success in all their movements and struggle and we hope that the new year will bring the Forward more useful work and still better results than it has had up to now.

    Today is the third anniversary of the Daily Jewish Forward in Chicago. The Forward has always had a large circle of readers and friends in Chicago. When it was decided ...

    Jewish
    II B 2 d 1, I H, III B 3 a
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 02, 1922
    On the Threshold of the New Year (Summary)

    Our foremost mutual benefit societies have arranged a New Year's festival. Among these societies, the following deserve to be mentioned first: The Cesko-Slovánské Podporující Spolky (Czecho-Slavonic Benevolent Societies), the Cesko-Slovanska Jednota (Czecho-Slavonic Union), and the Jednota Ceských Dam (Bohemian Ladies Society).

    A Festival of the Grand Lodge of the

    Cesko-Slovanske Podporujici Spolky

    First of all we must mention the New Year's festival of the grand lodge of the Cesko-Slovanské Podporujici Spolky of the State of Illinois, which was held at the usual place, West 18th and May Streets. The festival should have begun promptly at 2 P. M., but due to unavoidable circumstances, it 2actually started half an hour later.

    The hall was filled to capacity. This was chiefly due to the colorful and varied program. The festival was officially opened by the chairman of the grand lodge, Mr. Otto T. Pergler, who asked the audience to excuse the absence of Professor B. Simek of Iowa State University. Professor Simek was originally listed as the main speaker at this festival, but at the eleventh hour he decided not to come because of the illness of his wife. Professor B. Kral was asked to address the lodge in his stead, but, unfortunately, he, too, became ill. It was for this reason that the chairman, Mr. Pergler, was compelled to deliver the opening speech himself. After greeting the audience, he called attention to past practices of the Cesko-Slovenske Podporujici Spolky, which used to busy themselves with extraneous matters; now, however, the time has come when the societies must pay more attention to their own interests and their own mission.

    He stressed the need for relying, not upon the work which the leaders of the 3various societies are doing, but rather upon the work of every individual member. The chief duty of the members is to propagandize the work of their societies. At this juncture he indicated the kind of work Mr. Janes of Town of Lake has accomplished not only as a member of his own lodge, but as a co-operating member of the whole group of societies. He pointed to the work of this man as a pattern to be followed by others. He likewise stressed the meaning of the work of the combined societies; he indicated the particular worth of the activities of the younger members, who, when asked to participate in the leadership of their societies, especially in regard to the arrangement of entertainments, are able to bring many benefits to the union as a whole. He followed these general remarks with a speech in the English language addressed to the younger generation, the contents of this latter speech being in sum and substance the same as his Czech address. We may report that Mr. Pergler's addresses deserved great approbation.

    Shortly after the conclusion of his speeches, the program continued, the individual items of which were chiefly musical numbers, recitations, and songs.

    4

    Deserving of mention was a classical dance number. The program terminated with a one-act comedy produced by the veteran player, Mr. Josef Jurka. The actors who took part in this comedy were: Miss J. Sachaufet, Mr. J. Holan, Mrs. Anton Cervenka, Messrs. B. Janous, J. Svoboda, V. Prochazka, and Miss A. Schaufel.

    During the course of this comedy, a collection for the benefit of our shelter and orphanage was undertaken. The collection netted sixty-eight dollars. The managing committee consisted of Josef Jurka, J. Janda, V. H. Filip, K. Kopecky, Fr. Veselik, and J. Filip. We must mention that Mr. Vaclav Petrzelka, the speaker representing the Svobodna Obec (Free Thought Community) and the Svaz Svobodomyslnych (the Federation of Bohemian Freethinkers), participated in the festival. When he learned that the chief speaker, Professor Simek, could not attend, he attempted to get the floor for five minutes, wishing to address the assembled members from the standpoint of the Freethinkers. His request was denied. As an excuse he was told that there was no time for any more addresses, and that there were many other attractive features on the program. Why this 5happened we cannot say, but all in all, we can say that the managing committee ought to be satisfied with the results.

    The Festival of the Czecho-Slavonic Union

    The attractively decorated hall of the Plzensky Sokol (Pilsen Gymnastic Association) on Ashland Avenue was filled to capacity yesterday afternoon. The regular New Year's festival of the Cesko-Slovanska Jednota was held here. The program was rich and varied, consisting chiefly of entertainment. After the playing of an orchestral number under the direction of R. Bartos and a short address by Mrs. F. Mrazek, there followed a recitation by little Jirina Roucek entitled, "What We Want and What We Get".....The main speaker at the festival was the well-known national worker, Dr. Karel Neumann, president of the grand lodge. The substance of his speech was a description of club life and its meaning for our nationality, with a few remarks concerning the purely humane and benevolent activities in which our societies are engaged. This speaker emphasized the fact that the annual New Year's festivals are above all 6a sort of inventory of the work performed during the previous year, and are not meant primarily to be entertainments. In this respect the union may be proud of its accomplishments, particularly in the faithful fulfillment of its duties during the year just terminated.

    The union is just ending the thirtieth year of its existence, and its splendid work in the past is a fitting climax for its thirtieth anniversary. The speaker also pointed out the differences between the Bohemian societies and those of other language groups. While other societies originate and perish, ours continue to thrive and to increase in membership.....What is the basic reason for this phenomenon? It is our close economy. We manage things scrupulously, anxiously saving every penny, but at the same time we support every deserving national project as much as we can. In other language groups there is a lack of such economy and bad financial leadership. Dr. Neumann admonished all those present to continue to conduct their affairs with the same indefatigable zeal.....The program of the orchestra consisted mainly of classical compositions. The evening was set aside for lighter diversions such as dancing, etc.....

    7

    Festival of the Central Committee of the Jednota Ceskych Dam

    The luxurious assembly hall of the Harrison High School, 24th Street and Marshall Boulevard, was filled to capacity by the members and friends of our oldest and strongest woman's organization. The Jednota Ceskych Dam is very well known not only throughout our land, but also in the distant country of our origin.....The program started shortly after one o'clock. After the playing of the American national anthem, the president of the state organization, Mrs. Anna Brychta, gave her opening address of welcome.....She recalled the origin and the beginnings of the Jednota Ceskych Dam, which during the half century of its existence, has gathered into its ranks almost twenty-five hundred women distributed all over the United States and grouped into 145 organizations.....There were other speakers on the program, as well as musical numbers, recitations, and a one-act play. The ballet school of Mrs. Libuse Bartusek-Brown was well represented by its pupils of both sexes, whose performances have frequently earned them well-deserved applause.....The orchestra of Mr. Rudolf Rubringer rendered a few concert pieces. The arrangement 8committee consisted of Misses. M. Smrcek, A. Brychta, K. Novy, Alzbeta Lisa, M. Horovy, Rosie Lapka, Anna Kroca, and Frantiska Schejbal.

    Our foremost mutual benefit societies have arranged a New Year's festival. Among these societies, the following deserve to be mentioned first: The Cesko-Slovánské Podporující Spolky (Czecho-Slavonic Benevolent Societies), the Cesko-Slovanska ...

    Bohemian
    II D 1, IV, III C, II D 4, II B 3
  • The Albanian Journal -- January 02, 1922
    An Albanian College for Albania Next Summer Methodist Episcopal Church Extend Helping Hand to Shkipetars (Albanians) in Educational Endeavor

    The Albanian government has appealed to the Methodist Episcopal Church of America to undertake the establishment of an American college in Albania. Bishop Blake answered the call of Albania and sent to that country Professor Elmer E. Jones, director of the School of Education of Northwestern University at Evanston, to investigate educational conditions and future possibilities.

    Professor Jones spent three months in Albania last summer, visiting all the important cities and towns and studying the ancient traditions and the national customs of the Albanian people. He returned to Evanston a few weeks ago, and in his extensive report to the Board of Foreign Missions of the Methodist Episcopal Church of America strongly recommends the establishment of an American college in Albania.

    2

    "The Albanians are eager for education," says Professor Jones," and anything American is cherished by them. I was royally welcomed by them everywhere, and the people showed great appreciation of my interest in their educational welfare. Officers of the government and mayors of various towns came out many miles to meet me and escort me to their respective towns. The people swarmed around me, and I was overwhelmed with the kindness shown me. The hospitality of the Shkipetars, as the Albanians call themselves, is beyond comparison. I sat at banquets with them from early evening till midnight almost everyday, and I had a very pleasant time with them.

    "While in Tirana I had daily conferences with the leaders of the government. They were enthusiastic at my proposition and promised me every possible assistance in making the American college a success. The Albanian government is willing to offer suitable buildings for the college and will place at our disposal large tracts of land that we may need for agricultural experimental purposes. Albania is an undeveloped country but is very rich in resources. The land in the plains is very productive, and the mountains provide excellent 3pasture for the sheep and goats. Every family in the country keeps a certain number of sheep and goats, and there is a possibility of developing a wood industry.

    "The enthusiasm of the Albanian children amazed me when I visited them in their schools. They amused me with their beautiful songs which they sang everywhere I went. But the condition of the schools in many towns is appalling and books are scarce. It seems to me as though Albania is clamoring for education with hands outstreched toward America, and I have promised the Albanians American assistance in their educational development.

    "When the Albanian boys hear that we have a college at Valona they will climb the mountains and come to it. Education has been utterly neglected in Albania in the past, on account of the political animosity that has been prevalent in the Balkans, and Albanians who sought an education were compelled to study foreign languages, because their own language was prohibited by the Ottoman government, which ruled the country for four centuries, and was anathematized by the Greek Orthodox Church. Notwithstanding the Turkish government, the 4Greek clergy was a dominant force in the political affairs of Albania. Fortunately, both Turkey and Greece lost their political game in Albania, because since 1912 political authority has been in the hands of the Albanians themselves, who have proved their ability to run the government.

    "The Christian Albanians just lately severed their allegiance to the Greek Church and declared the Albanian Church independent."

    The Albanian government has appealed to the Methodist Episcopal Church of America to undertake the establishment of an American college in Albania. Bishop Blake answered the call of Albania and ...

    Albanian
    III H
  • Forward -- January 02, 1922
    First Victory for Cloakmakers in Conflict with Manufacturers

    In an unostentatious manner, president Schlessinger submitted a report to the cloakmakers about the settlement with the cloak manufacturers. As a leader, and as a responsible official he could not possibly have handled the settlement any better than he did. It was handled in a skillful manner, and it resulted in many good advantages for the cloakmakers.

    It must not be forgotten that what is going on in all parts of the country also goes on in Chicago.

    The organized capitalists, together with the cloak manufacturers, have undertaken no less a task than that of disrupting the unions and establishing an open shop. In some of the large industries, these methods were successful.

    2

    But in other industries, a bitter struggle resulted with millions of dollars spent by the manufacturers in order to carry out their program. An example of these methods against the unions could be observed in the Chicago Stockyards, and in the building trades.

    The cloak manufacturers have not declared an open fight in favor of the open shop. They proposed certain conditions which if accepted by the unions, would leave them as they were without power. The organization would be all broken up, and the cloak-makers would be compelled to fall back into slavery again, just as they were long ago, when they had no union.

    The settlement that was just made for the cloakmakers in Chicago is not an ordinary settlement, for in many cases it strengthens the position of the trade workers and further, it enables the workers to take their stand in 3defense of any attack made upon them by the cloak manufacturers from now on.

    This victory also shows that the cloakmakers of Chicago were the first ones to be in a position to repulse the attack of the organized cloak manufacturers.

    Now that the cloakmakers are returning to their work, proud and victorious, they should by all means begin to raise a large fund with which to protect themselves against future attacks. Very often, conflicts between cloak manufacturers and cloakmakers occur again, after the present contracts lapse.

    The Forward congratulates the cloakmakers on their victory, and is proud to have been in a position to help the cloakmakers reach their goal.

    4

    Cloakmakers, enter your shops bearing in mind the principle of devotion to your organization, and no power in the world can besiege you.

    In an unostentatious manner, president Schlessinger submitted a report to the cloakmakers about the settlement with the cloak manufacturers. As a leader, and as a responsible official he could not ...

    Jewish
    I D 2 a 4, I H, I D 1 a
  • The Albanian Journal -- January 02, 1922
    The Albanian College for Albania Next Summer.

    Methodist Episcopal Church extends helping hand to Shkipetars (Albanians) in educational endeavor.

    PROF. JONES PRAISES ALBANIANS.

    p. 1.- The Albanian government has appealed to the Methodist Episcopal Church of America to undertake the establishment of an American college in Albania. Bishop Blake answered the call of Albania and sent to that country Prof. Elmer E. Jones, director of the School of Education of North-western University of Evanston, to investigate educational conditions and future possibilities.

    Prof. Jones spent three months in Albania last summer visiting all the important cities and towns and studying the archaic characteristics and the 2national customs of the Albanian people. He returned to Evanston a few weeks ago and in his extensive report to the Board of Foreign Missions of the Methodist Episcopal Church of America strongly recommends the establishment of the American college in Albania.

    "The Albanians are eager for education," says Prof. Jones, "and anything American is cherished by them. I was royally welcomed by them everywhere, and the people showed great appreciation of my interest in their educational welfare. Officers of the government and mayors of various towns came out many miles to meet me and escort me to their respective towns. The people swarmed around me, and I was bored with kindness shown me. The hospitality of the Shkipetars, as the Albanians call themselves, is beyond comparison.

    "I sat at banquets with them from early evening till midnight almost everyday and I had a very pleasant time with them.

    3

    "While in Tirana I had daily conferences with the leaders of the government. They were enthusiastic at my proposition and promised me every possible assistance to make the American college a success. The Albanian government is willing to offer suitable buildings for the college and will place at our disposal large tracts of land for agricultural experimental purposes such as we may need. Albania is an undeveloped country but with very rich resources. The land in the plains is very productive and the mountains provide excellent pasture for the sheep and goats. Every family in the country keeps a certain number of sheep and goats, and there is a possibility for the development of the wool industry.

    "The enthusiasm of the Albanian children amazed me when I visited them in their schools. They amused me with their beautiful songs which they sang everywhere I went. But the condition of the schools in many towns is appalling and books are scarce. It seems to me as though Albania is clamoring for education with outstretched hands toward America, and I have promised 4to the Albanians American assistance in their educational development.

    "When the Albanian boys hear that we have a college at Valona they will climb up the mountains and come to it. Education has been utterly neglected in Albania in the past on account of the political animosity that has been prevalent in the Balkans, and Albanians who sought education were compelled to study foreign languages because their own language was prohibited by the Ottoman government, which ruled the country for four centuries, and anathematized by the Greek Orthodox Church. Notwithstanding the Turkish government, the Greek clergy was a dominant authority in the political affairs of Albania. Fortunately, both Turkey and Greece lost their political game in Albania, because since 1912 political authority is in the hands of the Albanians themselves who have proved their ability to run the government.

    "The Christian Albanians just lately severed their allegiance to the Greek Church and declared the Albanian Church independent."

    Methodist Episcopal Church extends helping hand to Shkipetars (Albanians) in educational endeavor. PROF. JONES PRAISES ALBANIANS. p. 1.- The Albanian government has appealed to the Methodist Episcopal Church of America ...

    Albanian
    I A 1 a, III H, III C
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 03, 1922
    The Bohemian Charitable Association Satisfactory Report at the Close of the Year

    The managing committee of the Ceska Dobrocinna Spolecnost (Bohemian Charitable Association) held a meeting last Thursday in its offices located on 26th Street and Kedzie Avenue. Mr. A. J. Sokol presided. The purpose of this meeting was to audit the disbursements and receipts for this year. The treasurer of the ball committee, Dr. F. L. Fortelka, submitted a detailed financial report on the last ball given by the society, and turned over to the treasury the net proceeds of that entertainment, amounting to $2,303.18. The ball committee consisted of the chairman, Alois Solar; Chas. J. Novak, secretary; and Dr. F. L. Fortelka, treasurer. The efforts of the ladies' committee of the Ceska Dobrocinna Spolecnost were praiseworthy. These ladies took care of all the work in the kitchen. The Reverend Vaclav Vanek, who is the treasurer of the Christmas Gift Fund, reported that this fund amounts to $3,512, and that 324 individuals contributed sums ranging from $1 to $100. Those families which were in need were given Christmas baskets and ready cash in amounts ranging 2from $5 to $35.

    After the payment of all the bills, the balance was turned over to the treasurer of the Ceska Dobrocinna Spolecnost. This balance will be used for the regular fund and will go toward the support of needy families during the winter months. Mr. Anton J. Cermak is chairman of the gift committee.

    Belated and additional contributions to the Christmas fund were received from the following: The Hub Company, State Street and Jackson Boulevard, $10; Frank J. Petru, 1443 West 18th Street, $5; August Patera, 2025 South Crawford Avenue, $5; J. A. Budilovsky, 2230 South Kedzie Avenue, $5. Two dollars were received from each of the following: Joseph Pelc, 3443 West 26th Street; Josef Cicovsky, 1942 West 51st Street; Robert B. Zika, 2934 Lexington Avenue; Charles Chvalovsky, 4139 Colorado Avenue. All of the contributors were given appropriate mention in the daily papers and will also be mentioned in a special annual report of the Ceska Dobrocinna Spolecnost.

    3

    We should also like to mention that Mr. August Geringer took care of three needy families recommended by us. Miss Helen Cermak and Messrs. Sachs, Sr. and Jr., distributed the Christmas baskets from morning to night, using their own automobiles for that purpose. During the Thursday meeting of the board of directors, the following membership dues and contributions were also received: John Tancl, 1921 Blue Island Avenue, $5; J. Illich 2059 18th Place, $5; Albin B. Holecek, 1402 Hartford Building, $5; Vaclav Jelinek, 2610 South Millard Avenue, $10; the editor, Robert J. Psenka, $10; John J. Boehm, 1901 Halsted Street, Adams' State Bank, $25. Miss Cimburek contributed hats, the combined value of which was $25. The board of directors of the Ceska Dobrocinna Spolecnost wishes to express its thanks to all benefactors who remembered the needy Bohemian families of Chicago during the past year with gifts and contributions; the board is also grateful to our Bohemian daily press for its great moral support in offering free space in the newspapers.

    The managing committee of the Ceska Dobrocinna Spolecnost (Bohemian Charitable Association) held a meeting last Thursday in its offices located on 26th Street and Kedzie Avenue. Mr. A. J. Sokol ...

    Bohemian
    II D 10, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 03, 1922
    Notations of a Reporter

    Mrs.Sophia Wyka, 4417 So. Lincoln Street, while returning home from visiting her son Stephan, 4408 So. Wood Street, was shot by a strikebreaker, Walter Damowicz, who was hiding in his home at 4405 So. Honore Street.

    As a number of strike sympathizers were trying to get into the building, Damowicz opened fire from a window. Mrs. Wyka was taken to the office of Dr. Witkowski and received first-aid attention. She was later taken to the County Hospital. Anthony Bartkowski, 4405 So. Wood Street, and John Rafa, 4404 So. Wood Street, were witnesses.

    Mrs.Sophia Wyka, 4417 So. Lincoln Street, while returning home from visiting her son Stephan, 4408 So. Wood Street, was shot by a strikebreaker, Walter Damowicz, who was hiding in his ...

    Polish
    I D 2 a 4, II E 2, I D 2 a 3
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 03, 1922
    FrantiŠEk LudvÍK's Bohemian Dramatic Association

    ....The management of our first and foremost theater, Ludvikovcí (Ludvik's Dramatic Association) zealously watches all the developments of Czech dramatic literature in the old country, and recently was able to obtain a novelty for the Bohemian-American stage.....This is a serious play called "Ondráš a Juráš" (Andrew and George), which takes us back to our rich but unfortunately sad history. The Slovak national hero, Ondráš, by his self-sacrifice, gives proof of the honest character of our folk. After finishing his studies, he secures a position as an official in the service of the prince, but when, later, he discovers how badly the serfs are treated, he quits his comfortable post and becomes a champion of the oppressed and a holy terror to the oppressors.

    The management of the theater has not spared any expense to make this play a first-class production.....The historical phase of the play deals with the year 1715, and the management of the theater will see to it that all the 2historical features of that period are preserved, The management is very careful to select such plays as would answer the popular tastes of our people, but together with that they give an educational and a moral basis to the further development of the Czech stage in America.

    It is hoped that our public will attend the production of this play on Sunday in the hall of Sokol Chicago and pay tribute to this excellent historical work. Stage direction will be under the supervision of Mrs. B. Ludvik. The appropriate musical accompaniment will be under the direction of Mr. J. Juřena.

    ....The management of our first and foremost theater, Ludvikovcí (Ludvik's Dramatic Association) zealously watches all the developments of Czech dramatic literature in the old country, and recently was able to ...

    Bohemian
    II A 3 d 1, III H
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 03, 1922
    An Anniversary of a Bohemian School The Free Thought School Vojta Náprstek Celebrated its Twenty-Fifth Anniversary Yesterday

    Yesterday was a significant day for the Vojta Náprstek school, its student body, its Junior Club, and its alumni. Among the latter were representatives of the earliest class, which entered the institution twenty-five years ago, as well as more recent graduates. This was a silver jubilee of that institution, and among the public that came to the Sokol Chicago yesterday afternoon and evening, there were many of our countrymen who attended the Náprstek school twenty-five years ago while it was still in its infancy. The school still enjoys great popularity today. A quarter of a century in the life of a Bohemian-American school is certainly not a minor event, when we consider how much labor and sacrifice are required for its maintenance.....The stimulus for the establishment of the Náprstek school came in the year 1896 when our "California" district was an enormous Czech settlement; and on October 16, 1896, there took place the first advisory meeting of the representatives of the 2various societies, together with the many enthusiastic national workers, all of whom discussed the pressing need for a Czech school. Those present recognized such a need, and on November 17 of the same year, a meeting of the organizing committee was held. This committee decided to found and maintain such a school.

    The newly organized institution was given the name "Vojta Náprstek". The following societies were represented at the organizing meeting: Sokol Chicago, Loze Trocnov Jednoty Taboritu (Lodge Trocnov of the Taborites), Sbor Bozena Nemcova Slovanska Podpurna Jednota (Bozena Nemcova Czecho-Slavonic Benevolent Association), Rad Sumavan Ceskoslovanska Bratrska Podporujici Jednota (The Order of Sumavan of the Czecho-Slavonic Brotherly and Benevolent Association), Rad Caslav Cesko-Slovansky Podpurny Spolek (Order of Caslav of the Czecho-Slavonic Benevolent Association), Sbor Palma Jednota Ceskych Dam (The Palma Group of the Bohemian Ladies Society), Rad Vladislav Cesko-Slovanske Bratrske Podpurne Jednoty (The Order of Vladislav of the Czecho-Slavonic Fraternal and Benevolent Association). During that same year, some other 3organizations joined the committee. These were the Lesnicky Dvur Jan Zizka (Court John Zizka of the Order of Bohemian Foresters), and the Loze Svatopluk Cech Jednoty Taboritu (Lodge Svatopluk Cech of the Taborites). Mr. Vaclav Roubal was elected as first president, the office of the vice-president went to Mrs. K. Pecival; Mr. F. Rek became the secretary; Mrs. J. Sinagla was the financial secretary; and Mr. A. Konvalinka was elected treasurer.

    The new organization started its preparatory and preliminary work immediately, and in the April meeting of the following year, the educational council announced that it had rented a school-room on Kedzie Avenue. May 8 of the same year witnessed the registration of pupils. The first instructor was Mr. J. Meduna, but shortly after that he was succeeded by Mr. K. Sima. By the end of May the schools attendance was 103 pupils. In the spring of the year 1898, it was necessary to add another grade, and one year later the whole school was moved to the Sokol Chicago building. Mr. Bohumil Hladky was at that time appointed its headmaster. This gentleman was active for about 4twenty years in the Náprstek school.

    In March, 1901, the third grade was organized; a year after that the fourth; and the continued growth of the school convinced its representatives and its devoted workers that the time had come to think about the erection of a school building. This resulted in the purchase of a plot of ground on Homan Avenue, and on April 2, 1911, the cornerstone was laid.

    On July 9, the new building was ready for occupancy, and since that day it has not only sheltered the largest Bohemian-American school, but has also provided space for the numerous meetings of our many societies.

    This year the school is attended by 552 pupils who compose the daily, the Saturday, and the Sunday classes. The present faculty consists of the following: Mr. U. Ulach, the Misses E. Kovar, F. Hulka, L. Weiner, and M. H. Beranek, and Mr. A. Machek.

    One of the happy results of the enthusiastic labor of the teaching staff was 5the organization of the Vojta Náprstek Junior Club, which is the largest and the most active organization of this sort in the United States. The Club was founded in 1918, and since that time has been uninterruptedly active, particularly in arranging theatrical productions and other fine entertainments. The membership of the Club is reserved for the alumni of the Náprstek school who are between the ages of 14 to 18, and it is desirable that every member of the adolescent group belong to this wonderful organization.

    The annual celebration to commemorate the founding of Vojta Náprstek school was held yesterday afternoon and evening in the hall of Sokol Chicago, and it was very well attended. The afternoon program began with an opening speech by Mr. Richard Dusil, who is the chairman of the council under the direction of which the Junior Club functions. He greeted the audience warmly, expressing his joy over the successes the school has had during the first twenty-five years of its unselfish labor. The next speaker on the program was Mr. H. Hruby, who....spoke about the meaning of a Bohemian school.....This was followed by 6a fitting and vivid tableau presented by the pupils of the first and second daytime grades and those of the second grade in the Saturday classes under the direction of Miss F. Hulka, an instructor.....

    The afternoon program terminated with a two-act play for children, "Carovna Pistalka" (The Enchanted Whistle), performed by the pupils.....The program was successful, and several dance numbers added to the enjoyment of those present. The dances were performed by the pupils of Mrs. Libuska Bartusek-Brown....

    The evening program was managed and carried out by the Junior Club and the fourth grade pupils of the Saturday and Sunday classes; under the supervision of Mr. F. Vlach, an instructor. The poem, "Jubilejni Vzpominka" ( A Jubilee Memory), from the pen of Mr. A. J. Havranek, was the opening number.....This was followed by the ever-popular legendary play, "Strakonicky Dudak" (The Bagpiper of Strakonice), by Josef K. Tyl. Its production bore witness to the fact that it was conscientiously and diligently studied and rehearsed.....

    7

    The celebration of the anniversary was highly successful, and we wish for the school, upon its entry into the second quarter-century of its life, that its unselfish efforts and the self-sacrificing labors of its patrons and the faculty may be accompanied by continued success.

    Yesterday was a significant day for the Vojta Náprstek school, its student body, its Junior Club, and its alumni. Among the latter were representatives of the earliest class, which entered ...

    Bohemian
    II B 2 f, III C, II B 3, II D 1, II B 1 c 2, II B 1 c 1
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 03, 1922
    From the Strime Front

    Some of our more considerate citizens are making donations to the needy families of the Stockyards' strikers; however, there are many that have not given a kindly thought in this direction. We have been informed that Rev. Frs. J. Obyrtacz C.R., Casimir Sztuczko C.S.C., and Stephan Kowalczyk C.R. have made contributions recently. It is hoped that others will take interest in this kindly cause.

    The strikers have posted placards in the vicinity of the Stockyards which inform the people that the strike is not over. The signs have been printed in English, Lithuanian, and Polish and have been posted on many telegraph poles throughout the packing house area.

    2

    Meetings of the strikers will continue to be held daily in the same places announced in a previous issue.

    Some of our more considerate citizens are making donations to the needy families of the Stockyards' strikers; however, there are many that have not given a kindly thought in this ...

    Polish
    I D 2 a 4, III C, II D 10, I D 2 a 3