The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Forward -- January 01, 1920
    (No headline)

    We call the attention to all countrymen, vereins, and organizations in Chicago who gave money to help the war afflicted, in various states and regions, that they are requested to send delegates to the convention that will meet on Sunday Dec. 19th, 10 a.m. in the Morrison Hotel, under the auspices of the Chicago Joint Relief Committee. The conference is called by Dr. S. S. Schmidt, supervisor of the countrymen's division and of the Joint Distribution Committee of America.

    The important question of sending money to Europe by delegates, under the supervision and protection of the Joint Distribution Committee will be discussed. All secretaries of various countrymen vereins and organizations are asked to introduce this invitation at their next meeting. Or to call special meetings for this purpose and elect delegates to the convention. Notify the Chicago Joint Relief Committee, 720 W. Roosevelt Rd. by mail or call Monroe 977. Dr. Schmidt will address the convention.

    The Chicago Joint Relief Committee. - S. J. Rosenblatt, acting chairman, A. Liederman, sec'y, Samuel Phillipson, treasurer, S. Nevelev, manager.

    We call the attention to all countrymen, vereins, and organizations in Chicago who gave money to help the war afflicted, in various states and regions, that they are requested to ...

    Jewish
    III B 4, II D 10
  • Svenska Kuriren -- January 01, 1920
    Necessary Legislation

    Congress will convene again on January 5 to resume the work suspended for the Christmas holidays. The most important legislation is the adjustment of the economic status of the railroads, their position in respect to the state and their workers, at the time when the railroads in accordance with the decision of the President, are to be returned, to their owners on March 1. The Senate has passed the Cummins Bill, and the House of Representatives has passed the Esch Bill. Both are now in the hands of a conference committee that will seek to equalize the differences for a joint decision. The greatest difference is the strike question. The Senate bill would take the right to strike away from the railroad workers, while the Esch Bill does not suggest limiting the rights of the workers.

    No matter how much one may deplore and yet seek to counteract the difficulties 2which arise through strikes, particularly in enterprises or institutions upon which the undisturbed progress of the entire community life is dependent, we still believe that prohibiting strikes by law constitutes an encroachment on the personal freedom which is guaranteed the American people by the constitution. Therefore, we consider such an abridgment to be self-evident in the nature of basic law. Thus, nothing can be effected, except in the manner prescribed by the constitution itself. We hope, in the meantime, that this stumbling block will be avoided for a quick settlement. We will simply invite an economic crisis, with serious consequences, if we do not put the railroads in order so that they may again take up their duties under properly organized conditions, as much as possible before the time set for returning the railroads to private operators.

    We place, without doubt, this indigenous question first of all. It appears 3to us far less important whether or not, as it is now rumored, a compromise can be effected in regard to a ratification of the treaty of peace. We now hear talk about deliberations in that direction among the leaders in Congress. But we cannot see what these deliberations can accomplish when we know that the only compromise which can be thought of is for President Wilson to show that he is willing to abandon the intractable standpoint he has taken heretofore.

    If he does not, then the question of a compromise falls short of itself. The thought of what may follow thereafter need not frighten anyone. Those who should be most anxious for a quick peace settlement - the American people - do not appear to permit such minor matters to upset their digestion. We should like to think that a much larger number of American citizens uneasily await what is to be the situation in this country after January 16, 1920, and whether or not the highest court settles the prohibition question before 4then, than those who will permit their reasoning to be occupied by the final fate of the League of Nations. Indifference in this regard is greater than ever, for a year ago the League of Nations had at least some interest as news. At the same time, one can also truthfully say that opposition to America's mixing in European politics increases with each day that passes. But it is still not so strong but what the majority of the people would be satisfied if a settlement could be effected between President Wilson and the Senate, in respect to the League of Nations. Taken as a whole, however, one still considers it to be of less importance in comparison to other questions which stand nearer to us, and about which, we therefore are able to form our own convictions.

    Congress will convene again on January 5 to resume the work suspended for the Christmas holidays. The most important legislation is the adjustment of the economic status of the railroads, ...

    Swedish
    I H, I D 1 a, I D 2 a 4
  • Svenska Kuriren -- January 01, 1920
    Swedish Chamber of Commerce

    At the luncheon of the Swedish Chamber of Commerce, held last Tuesday, at the Morrison Hotel, Mr. R. K. Stanler gave a short, but most interesting lecture on dried lingberries as an imported Swedish commodity in this country. The lecturer represents Svenska Medicinal Vaxtforeningen (the Swedish Officinal Plant Society) which has its main office in Stockholm. This organization was formed about ten years ago, when it was noticed that the apothecaries in Sweden transplanted a rather large number of dried blueberries each year, which were imported from Germany. This seemed rather strange, when Sweden among other things, is an eminent blueberry land. At length, it finally came to light that Germany purchased the fresh blueberries from Sweden, pressed the juice from them and re-shipped the shells in the form of dried blueberries to the North. When this was discovered, it was then decided to dry the 2berries at home, and with this in view, the Swedish Officinal Plant Society was founded. This society has since broadened its work to the extent that at the present time, it owns about forty drying establishments in various sections of the country.

    After experimenting with success in drying blueberries by electricity, it was decided to experiment with drying lingonberries by this same method. The experiments succeeded exceptionally well. The dried lingonberries are now sold in the winter not only in Sweden, but they are also exported to the other Scandinavian countries. America, too, has the opportunity to take advantage of the usefulness of this commodity. Mr. Stanler pointed out that through the drying process the dried lingonberries became sweeter than the fresh berries, because they undergo about the same procedure as grapes do when they are pressed into raisins. He also said that no more than one-third of the sugar is used in the preservation of the dried berries 3than would be needed if they were in their fresh state. Further, the dried berries are much lighter in weight and thus cost but a fraction of the price for fresh berries. Above all, the Swedish lingonberries are tastier than any other. Finally, the lecturer made it known that at the present time he is negotiating with a number of large American firms in regard to sole rights as distributors, so that the berries may be obtained in every well-known grocery store in America. The lingberries are packed in Sweden, in cartons that also make a good impression upon the buyer. We hope that these Swedish berries will have a great future in this country, and the Swedes here will certainly be happy to be able to eat genuine Swedish lingberry jam.

    At the luncheon of the Swedish Chamber of Commerce, held last Tuesday, at the Morrison Hotel, Mr. R. K. Stanler gave a short, but most interesting lecture on dried lingberries ...

    Swedish
    I D 1 a, III H, II B 2
  • Forward -- January 01, 1920
    (No headline)

    The Tag Day, for the benefit of the Proskurov program victims, was a success. It the volunteers would have responded in greater numbers, the relief would have appropiated, at least, $5,000. Although the relief has a net profit of approximately $1,000.

    The Proskurov Relief, thanks the Jewry of Chicago, through the courtesy of the Forward, that helped materialize this Tag Day into success.

    The Tag Day, for the benefit of the Proskurov program victims, was a success. It the volunteers would have responded in greater numbers, the relief would have appropiated, at least, ...

    Jewish
    II D 10, V A 1
  • Svenska Kuriren -- January 01, 1920
    Mrs. Othelia Myhrman Decorated by King Gustaf

    Last Saturday afternoon a pleasant happening occurred to our highly esteemed Mrs. Othelia Myhrman. S. T. De Goes, consul general, invited her to come to his home on Saturday afternoon at 3 P. M. Thinking that the consul general wished to take counsel with her about an important matter in which she was well versed, Mrs. Myhrman accepted the invitation, and promised to come on time. Arriving at the specified time, Mrs. Myhrman found the house filled with gentlemen in formal dress. Rather surprised to find that she was the only woman present, she sat down at the table and partook of the delicacies offered. While coffee was served, the host informed the guests, to their surprise, that Mrs. Myhrman had been granted the Gold Court Medal of the Eighth Degree by King Gustaf. After a few words, the consul general presented this award, together with the official letter, to the astonished Mrs. Myhrman. Deeply moved, she thanked him for the honor which had been bestowed on her.

    The letter from the King reads as follows:

    2

    "His Majesty, the King, in His Grace is pleased to confer upon Mrs. Othelia Myhrman the Gold Medal of the Eighth Degree, bearing the Royal Crown, to be worn on a deep blue band upon the chest. This, may I, in gracious command, hereby communicate.

    "Stockholm Castle, October 1, 1919.

    (Signed) "Otto Printzskold."

    The medal is the size of one crown, with the bust of the King on the obverse. The only inscription appearing on the reverse side is: "Othelia Myhrman". We have been informed by Consul General De Goes that, at first, it was the intention [of the King] to grant to Mrs. Myhrman the large labor medal, "Illis, quorum mervere labores". But when this question came up, King Gustaf was forced to take cognizance of the fact that this medal could not be granted to a foreigner. 3Because Mrs. Myhrman lived in America it was impossible to award this medal to her, although she is much more Swedish-minded than many native Swedish patriots. As far as we know, Mrs. Myhrman is the only person in America who has been granted this medal, sharing this honor with nobody in the United States.

    The reason why Mrs. Myhrman was decorated in this manner is quite obvious. Her brilliant work among the Swedes in Chicago during the past thirty years, and her extensive relief work during this same period are sufficient reasons why the sun of grace has spread its bright ray from Sweden in this direction. One thing is certain: Mrs. Myhrman has honestly earned the distinction bestowed upon her.

    The Sevenska Kuriren takes this opportunity to offer its very best wishes to Mrs. Myhrman.

    Last Saturday afternoon a pleasant happening occurred to our highly esteemed Mrs. Othelia Myhrman. S. T. De Goes, consul general, invited her to come to his home on Saturday afternoon ...

    Swedish
    IV, I C, III H, II D 10
  • Svenska Kuriren -- January 01, 1920
    Trade Exchange between Sweden and America

    The Swedish Consul General in New York, Mr. Olof H. Lamm, requests us to correct a faulty statement contained in the telegram from Stockholm, which was reprinted in our newspaper. The telegram in question stated:

    "The administrative commission, which examined the economic situation, supported restrictions on imports to restore the trade balance."

    The Consul General has received the following telegram from the foreign department in Stockholm:

    "No such control has been introduced in Sweden. The proposal made by the finance counsel has for its aim, mainly, to limit the importation of luxuries, which measure, likewise, has been discussed in Norway and Denmark, but no decision has yet been arrived at by the administration in this matter."

    The only error we find in our reproduction of the first telegram appears to 2be that such a measure has not been acted upon (to restore the balance of trade). That this statement be quickly corrected, seemed important to the Consul and the correction is hereby gladly made.

    Mr. Lamm felt that if the impression were created here that Sweden was limiting imports from the United States, it would be harmful to both countries. No legislation against American goods is, in any way, contemplated in Sweden.

    The same issue of Svenska Kuriren (The Swedish Courier), in which the incorrect telegram appeared also contained a longer article by Mr. Hal O'Flaherty, correspondent of the Chicago Daily News, the New York Globe, and a number of other American newspapers in Stockholm. Mr. O'Flaherty speaks of the imminent difficulties in trade relations between Sweden and America. He appears to know that many shipments of goods purchased in America for Sweden are to be refused by the consignees, because heavy loses will be incurred, due to the drop in the rate of exchange, on the Swedish Krona (crown), since the purchases were consummated.

    3

    O'Flaherty maintains, also, that the Swedish merchant, in such a case, will follow the example of the Danes. He relates in this connection, that American goods, arriving at Copenhagen, were shipped back to New York by the Danish buyers, and there sold at a profit.

    The case mentioned does not indicate that American shipments were refused by the Danish consignees, but reveals the highly remarkable circumstance that certain American commodities rose in price in America, in a few weeks or months, so that it was possible to pay double ocean freight charges and sell the commodities at a profit in the country from whence they were originally exported. But it is taken for granted that the Danish buyers accepted the goods. Otherwise, they could not command them and sell them on their own account in the United States.

    The American correspondents charge that a number of shipments consigned to Gothenburg are going to be refused by the Swedish buyers has created a sensation among our countrymen here who are interested in seeing that trade relation between Sweden and America not only continue undisturbed, but that they be developed as much as possible.

    4

    Protest against the insinuations of Mr. O'Flaherty have been proposed. For our part, we regard them as hardly worthy of consideration. We have no fear of discord in international relations for this reason.

    As a rule, American exports are a "cash transaction." In unusual cases, when credit is given, one may be absolutely sure that the security for the fulfilment of payment is perfectly good. Besides, it is reported, truly enough, that hardly any Swedish buyer, making purchases abroad, cares to jeopardize his credit by refusing to meet his obligations due to a fear of losses unforseen at the time the deal was closed.

    No Swedish court would release him from a contract for such a reason. It would be entirely different if the merchandise did not come up to standard. Such cases may very well occur, and there are, of course, quite a number of dishonest merchants even here in America.

    We consider that we may leave Mr. O'Flaherty's story for what it is worth, which in our eyes is very little.

    5

    Consul Lamm's writing gives us, in the meantime, reason to comment on the vexatious deterioration in Swedish monetary values, and possible remedies for the evil. It does no harm to recall that Swedish monetary values are much better than the Norwegian or Danish, not to mention many other European countries. But Swedish stands noticeably poorer than Switzerland and Spain, two neutral countries.

    Despite the many scientific articles which daily offer "certain cures" against price increases, drop in monetary values, and for the balancing of the international exchange, we believe that only time can work a restoration to economic health, just as only time can heal all the other "sores" of the War.

    Financial leadership in Sweden is still greatly to blame for the unparalleled drop in monetary values due to an indefensible program of continued inflation.

    Whatever the status of Swedish money in relation to the dollar may be, it is, of course, clear that the condition cannot be improved if Sweden continues 6to buy commodities from America out of proportion to her own sales in America. This is a circumstance which was brought to light by a prominent Swedish man of industry, Chief Engineer A. F. Wahlberg, on a visit here, when he said:

    "There soon must be an end to alarm (sic). It should be recalled that the remark was made quite a few months ago, when the exchange was about normal, 26.70. It is now under twenty-two, has been still lower, but appears to have improved somewhat in the last few weeks. The prophecy may come true.

    We believe that Sweden can import as much as she wishes of American commodities, and can pay for them. The fear that American merchants must be treated kindly so that they will continue to export commodities to Sweden for cash need not worry us. Instead anxiety should be directed toward the opposite quarter. How can we increase the Swedish production level and export a surplus at prices which may prevail in world competition?

    7

    To work out this problem, all Swedish businessmen, manufactures, labor leaders, and financiers should give their attention. Without a doubt this is also the prime mission of the Swedish trade representatives in all other countries.

    The Swedish Consul General in New York, Mr. Olof H. Lamm, requests us to correct a faulty statement contained in the telegram from Stockholm, which was reprinted in our newspaper. ...

    Swedish
    III H, I C, II A 2, I D 1 a, II B 2 d 1
  • Svenska Kuriren -- January 01, 1920
    Ludvig Larson

    Who doesn't know Mr. Ludvig Larson, on the corner of Chicago Avenue, and Sedgwick, near Hesselroth's old drug store? All Swedes who have lived in this good city for a few years know him.

    Mr. Larson has been in the restaurant business for a generation there on the ground floor; and the second floor is known as Larson Hall.

    Mr. Larson, together with his wife, nee Ida Ekblom, were pleasantly surprised in the old, honorable, Swedish-American manner, last Saturday in their home, 565 Arlington Place, by about one hundred friends. The occasion was Mrs. Larson's birthday. It has always been celebrated with a grand coffee party. Mr. Larson wondered why in the world there were so many men at Mr. Larson's kettle-drum. However, later in the evening, he was enlightened when the director, John E. Ericsson, seized a coffee cup by the ear, raised it, and 2inquired, if it were possible to obtain a bit of a "prod in the weather." Oh, yes-John E. is never long-winded so he was served willingly. He began by congratulating Mrs. Larson on her birthday, but rebuked the lord of the house for permitting his silver wedding anniversary, which fell on October 24, to pass uncelebrated by the many friends of the family.

    Ericsson, speaking for all the guests, wished Mr. and Mrs. Larson many happy years ahead, and reminded them that friendship never dies, that the friends they have acquired still stand as a fortress of protection about them. As a remembrance of the day and friendship, Mr. Ericsson, in behalf of those present, presented a charming loving cup in silver, and in it were many ringing, new, white silver dollars. Mr. Larson expressed thanks for himself and Mrs. Larson, for the beautiful gift, but still more for their friendship. The evening hours passed quickly amid pleasant conversation and merriment.

    3

    Ludvig Larson is a native of Westgotha; he was born in the vicinity of Skofde, October 2, 1860. While a young man he emigrated and came directly to Chicago. That was in 1881. After having worked nine years for others, he opened his own restaurant in 1890, at 370 Chicago Avenue. He has made himself known as a straightforward, honest and industrious business man. Only recently, he gave up the enterprise and became a real estate broker.

    Larson is a Swedish-American in the highest sense of the word. He loves the land of his adoption without sacrificing his love for the sod of his fathers. He prefers to speak the mother-tongue; he gets on best among his countrymen, and his most earnest efforts are for Swedish fraternaties in Chicago. He is a member of the first Swedish society in Chicago, Svea; he is likewise a member of Vega, and the Svithiod lodge of the Svithiod order.

    Mrs. Larson was born in Eksjo, Smaland. She has lived most of her life in Chicago. The couple have one child, a daughter.

    Who doesn't know Mr. Ludvig Larson, on the corner of Chicago Avenue, and Sedgwick, near Hesselroth's old drug store? All Swedes who have lived in this good city for a ...

    Swedish
    I B 3 a, IV, V A 2, II A 2
  • Magyar Tribune -- January 02, 1920
    Theatrical Activities in Chicago

    The Chicago Hungarians are to be honored with the presence of a famous Hungarian theatrical group. This group is under the direction of Bela Szinde, a well known character to Chicago Hungarians. Mr. Szinde has worked hard to organize this group of actors. His work has met with much opposition; in particular, he was opposed by Alex Palasthy, who has done everything in his power to keep him from attaining his goal. Bela Szinde has encountered such opposition before, but every time he fought with renewed energy and won even greater victories.

    There have been many occasions on which we have criticized his work in regards to cultural development, but there is one thing we must admit. He has been a tireless worker in the cultural 2field. Next Sunday, January 11, this theatrical group will present two dramatic plays, "The Proletarian" and "The Queen of the Dollar." We hope that the Chicago-Hungarians will appreciate these performances. This is the only way we can show our appreciation to such a worthy cause and a great leader.

    An advertisment elsewhere in this issue gives in detail the high lights of the Plays, also the unusual interest already in evidence. We advise all desiring to see the Plays to purchase their tickets early to avoid being disappointed as has been the case in many instances before. It is very likely that the entire house will be sold out.

    The Chicago Hungarians are to be honored with the presence of a famous Hungarian theatrical group. This group is under the direction of Bela Szinde, a well known character to ...

    Hungarian
    II B 1 c 1
  • Forward -- January 02, 1920
    (No headline)

    The Literary and Dramatic Society will meet tonight. All members are requested to be present. A recommendation for the uniting with the Socialist Choir Verein will be discussed. H. K. Marmor will introduce the importance of uniting.

    The Literary and Dramatic Society will meet tonight. All members are requested to be present. A recommendation for the uniting with the Socialist Choir Verein will be discussed. H. K. ...

    Jewish
    II B 1 d, II B 1 a
  • Forward -- January 02, 1920
    (No headline)

    Sholom Alechim, the immortal poet, humorist and writer, left us remembrances to be read with laughter and tears. The outstanding comedy known as "The Great Winnings," is being presented for the fourth time by the Literary and Dramatic Society this Sunday December 5th, 2 p.m. at the Princess Theater.

    Sholom Alechim, the immortal poet, humorist and writer, left us remembrances to be read with laughter and tears. The outstanding comedy known as "The Great Winnings," is being presented for ...

    Jewish
    II A 3 d 1