The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 02, 1918
    On Behalf of the Little Bees

    The Vcelky (Little Bees), a ladies' auxiliary of the Czech National Alliance, have fully grasped the meaning of their task, and the results are becoming evident. It seems incredible that the Little Bees have been able to accomplish so much in just two months preceding Christmas. They have delivered at least 750 articles of charity. Every evening except Saturday they work in the Vojta Naprstek School.

    It is a pleasure to see the School. Every picture reveals how love for the old homeland is being instilled into the minds of the pupils. Almost every one of our aged women works for the cause. It fills our hearts with deep emotion to see a woman who is old, feeble, and wrinkled carrying wool from the school building, and to hear her say: "Well, I also am able to work."

    We expect that after New Year's Day many will join the Little Bees. We implore all women to assist us, either by working or by financing our 2charitable enterprise. Think of the sacrifices our boys are making! Will Czech America forsake them? Will it leave them suffering from cold storms and biting icy gales?

    Very much depends upon ourselves in these times. It is up to us to determine what work we will perform. We know that wool is hard to obtain. In some country districts very little wool is available for our women's charitable pursuits.

    If you need wool, write to the headquarters of the Czech National Alliance in Chicago. The Little Bees will see that you are supplied with material. Help! Help our most noble souls, who stand today with the Czechoslovak Army in France.

    Best wishes to all Little Bees, our sisters. Success to all friends and workers of the Czech National Alliance, particularly to the readers and editors of the Denni Hlasatel.

    3

    On behalf of the Little Bees of the Czech National Alliance in Chicago.

    Signed: Sophie Majer

    The Vcelky (Little Bees), a ladies' auxiliary of the Czech National Alliance, have fully grasped the meaning of their task, and the results are becoming evident. It seems incredible that ...

    Bohemian
    I K, I G, III H, III B 2, II D 10
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 02, 1918
    To the Women of Cicero

    We are addressing ourselves to all those who have a tender heart. Women, all of you, come and help! You can feel with a feminine heart what our heroes have to endure in the trenches for our downtrodden old homeland, the memory of which cannot be obliterated. We are convinced that there are many among you who can help mitigate the soldiers' sufferings. If our boys can face death, it would be a sad state of affairs if women were afraid of a little exertion. Women's hands, be they ever so weak, can accomplish much good.

    Do not be tardy! Increase the membership of the Vcelky (Little Bees), that organization of diligent women. On this occasion We wish to express our gratitude to all donors for the lovely gifts sent in to date. We implore those who cannot donate their services to make some monetary contribution. Those who wish to join the Little Bees may apply at Mrs. Moravicka's, 5411 West 24th Street.

    2

    Some of the donors and their contributions are: Sokol Karel Jonas, $10; the Ladies' Society, Mir Cechie (The Peace of Czech Lands), $9.05; the Union of Czech-American Women, Rozkvet Svobody (The Bloom of Liberty), $6.....

    We are addressing ourselves to all those who have a tender heart. Women, all of you, come and help! You can feel with a feminine heart what our heroes have ...

    Bohemian
    I G, I K, III B 2, II D 10
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 02, 1918
    Benevolent Society Celebrations Draw Large Crowds

    It would be needless repetition of a well-known fact if we should attempt to point out the profound significance of the annual New Year's celebrations of the various units of our powerful benevolent societies (Podpurnych Jednot). Whether devoted to social, cultural, or agitatorial activity, these gatherings have for years attracted the membership which is guided by the desire to be refreshed, to enjoy the company of fellow members, to rejoice over the prosperity of their unit, and to pledge itself to work for the benefit of the organization during the new year.

    It is not only the members of the organizations who fill these social meetings to capacity. The general public attends these affairs to gain an insight into the beneficent activities of the organizations and to learn of the various opportunities which they offer. This is the practical purpose of 2these entertainments. The organizations have long known that with ever-decreasing immigration it is becoming increasingly difficult to gain new members or even to retain a status quo. Therefore, the organizations have sought an immediate means of making contact with prospective members. There is no promise of an alteration in this scarcity of eligible men and women members. If we may judge by the results of the affairs given yesterday, we may say that they served their purpose excellently.

    Celebration of the Czecho-Slav Union

    Yesterday was a holiday for the Czecho-Slav Union and for the multitude of their patrons and well-wishers. This was indicated by the large attendance which the spacious hall of the Pilsen Sokol could hardly accommodate, and by the festive mood which prevailed throughout the celebration.

    The arrangements committee, consisting of Mrs. B. Laibl, Mrs. M. Pomazal, Mr. M. Cisar, and Mr. A. Turek, had planned a program which was rich in 3variety and color, and which represented a high artistic standard.

    Dr. J. P. Pecival, president of the Grand Lodge of the Czecho-Slav Union, was the main speaker of the afternoon. He elucidated on the difficulty of the conditions under which the Union is compelled to labor because of the abnormality of the present time. He emphasized the importance of co-operation as a prerequisite for the continued existence of the organization. In his opinion, a consolidation of the units is unavoidable, and was advocated long ago. The brotherhood organizations will feel obligated to merge into one large body, thus following the laudable example of our Sokols.

    In the course of his speech Dr. Pecival mentioned the work done by the Czech National Alliance.

    "This organization should receive the best possible support from Czechoslovak-America," he said, "for Czechoslovak independence is an ideal common to us all, and there never again will be as favorable a time to attain it. Here is an opportunity for our wealthy Czech people to fulfill a lofty duty, to sacrifice 4upon the altar of our subjugated homeland at least a part of their surplus wealth, and thus to memorialize their names as protectors whom the nation will esteem for centuries to come." Stormy applause rewarded the speaker.

    The musical numbers of the program, which fulfilled high artistic requirements, were received with evident pleasure. The orchestral program was arranged by Brother Joseph Cerny, and the selections were delivered in a manner worthy of any accredited orchestra.

    The Cesko-Delnicky Pevecky Sbor (Czech Workingmen's Singing Association), and the Sbor Tambururasu (Mandolin and Guitar Orchestra) also performed. The singers offered three Slovak songs composed by the talented music director, Jos. Houdek. They were: "Kde Si Bola?" (Where Were You?); "Ach, Moj Boze, Co Mam Robit?" (O My God What Am I To Do?), a baritone solo sung by Mr. Richard Adamira; and "Pi, Ondrisku, Pi" (Drink Little Andy, Drink). The turbulent applause which followed these numbers was an indication of the 5audience's hearty appreciation. The Tamburasi played a selection of songs, "Czech Pearls", arranged by J. Machac, and a medley from the opera, "Faust", by Gounod. These selections earned clamorous applause.

    Little Miss Marenka (May) Sramek, well known to our public, recited a satiric poem, "Svanda Dudak" (Svanda, the Bagpiper), by Korizek; the audience was carried away with the little girl's talent. The Liszt transcription of Mendelssohn's "Wedding March" was beautifully played as a piano solo by Miss Anna Cada. Miss Libusa (Libby) Zdenek moved the gathering by her art; she sang Marenka's air from Smetana's "Bartered Bride", "Kdybych Se Co Takoveho...." (Should I Ever Hear Anything Like That....). Mrs. Slavka Krejci, who as a soubrette has scarcely a rival upon our stage, charmed her listeners with Susie's song from Lehar's light opera, "Dratenicek," and Mr. Krejci sang a couplet, "Cesky Vandrak" (The Czech Wandering Boy), after which Mr. and Mrs. Krejci sang the piccolo-duet from "Waltz-Dream". The dancing school of Mrs. Helen Klaus-Mikuta gave an excellent exhibition of a "Fairy-6Dance". "Our Flags", a patriotic scene arranged by Dr. Anton Mueller, was executed by boys and girls of the Besidka (Little Club). There were several more recitations.....

    Dr. Ludwig Fisher was to have spoken for the Czech National Alliance, but he was unable to attend the celebration, because it was necessary that he appear at an out-of-town affair.

    Mr. Jan Hribal, auditor of the Czecho-Slav Union, made a financial report for the organization, which has 6,492 members. The organization's assets are $72,764.78. The treasury fund of the Grand Lodge amounts to $1,119.69; reserves are $66,422.71. The Union has paid (in 1087 death cases) benefits amounting to $928,021.71. Death benefits to the amount of $66,250 were paid last year.

    All lodges bought War Bonds very eagerly. The Grand Lodge paid $3,000 for the War Bonds which it purchased. Mr. Hribal spoke of the many improvements which have been made since the last fall meeting and which are expected to 7bear fruit in the near future. From the report it appears that the organization is founded upon sound economic principles, and that it has grown and prospered in spite of adverse general conditions. It is fulfilling its humanitarian and social purpose in our public and national life.

    The meeting closed with a dance, during which prizes were distributed to those who had been most successful in gaining new members.

    Czecho-Slav Benevolent Society Celebrates

    The Grand Lodge in Illinois and the local lodges of the Cesko-Slovanska Podporujici Spolecnost (abbreviated C. S. P. S., Czecho-Slav Benevolent Society) held their annual New Year's celebration yesterday in the Patronate House, West 18th and South May Streets. Without exaggeration it must be admitted that the program of the celebration was one of the best we have witnessed. If any fault is to be found then it must be found in the large number of lengthy selections. This made the program unduly long, so that the celebration did not come to an 8end until late at night.

    This remark is meant only as a suggestion to the arrangements committee. Next time it may be wise to remember the old Czech proverb that "too much--." In every other respect the committee deserves unstinted praise. Recognition for the untiring work of the committee was given by all those who had braved the inclement weather to be present at the celebration, and public recognition is accorded the committee through the press.

    The program was opened by the excellent orchestra led by Mr. Jos. V. Soukup, who also supplied two violin solos, the "Cavatine" by Raff, and "Serenade of a Pierrot" by Randeger. The performance of his orchestra far exceeded the performances of other orchestras heard on similar occasions.

    President J. Pecha, in addressing the gathering, spoke with emphasis and pointed to our duty at this time. He not only implored the members of every lodge, but 9every individual as well, to stand loyally by President Wilson and his Government in this critical time of war. His words were received with loud, patriotic enthusiasm.

    A fourteen-year-old boy, William Kriz, followed with an English oration, "Americanism", and was rewarded with thundering applause. Our well-known amateur actor and zealous patriotic worker, Joseph Jurka, held the undivided attention of the audience with a recitation of Sladek's poem "Na Predni Strazi" (On the Watch on the Foremost Front).

    The main speaker of the day was our fellow countryman from Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Attorney J. J. Vlach, a born orator. His was a heart-to-heart talk, delivered with true patriotic sentiment. In his address he laid emphasis upon unity, and upon the obligations which these grave times have placed upon our shoulders.

    Several other numbers followed on the program. These included dancing, singing, 10and two one-act comedies.

    The attendance was very good considering the bad weather. The celebration ended with a dance, which lasted until the morning hours. The arrangements committee may well be satisfied with the success of the day.

    It would be needless repetition of a well-known fact if we should attempt to point out the profound significance of the annual New Year's celebrations of the various units of ...

    Bohemian
    II D 1, IV, I G, III H, III G, III B 2, II B 1 a, III B 3 a, II B 1 c 2, II B 1 c 1
  • Dziennik Związkowy -- January 02, 1918
    Mothers of Yesteryear (Editorial)

    Some people claim that there is no longer a "married women's problem", but that there remains a girls' and widows' problem as far as their places in business and professional fields are concerned. But the important point is that women are employed, and that they must continue in employment; because of this parents should prepare their daughters as well as their sons for some useful work.

    Let us not forget, however, that it is not yet fifty years since woman has begun to take this part in the struggle for existence. To be sure, there were women in the past who supported themselves, but they were exceptions, not the general rule.

    All[married]women, girls, and widows who are now employed on a par with men, 2either at home or outside of home, whose work takes up all of their time and thoughts, need someone to provide them comfort at home just as employed men do. For example, could this or that young girl do the difficult work of a teacher or an artist if she did not have a loving mother at home to see that she was properly fed, and so on? Could this or that married woman or widow, who has been forced to seek employment, perform her duties conscientiously if she did not have someone at home to take her place with the children and to manage the household?

    Naturally, there are good and conscientious "substitute mothers", but what with the present day desire for "freedom", there are not many such women. And it must be added that women only in the rarest cases, as, for instance, famous artists, authors, or singers, earn enough money to satisfy all the demands of a governess. In most cases we find the mother of the working woman acting as her helper and substitute. No one else in her place, even though she is often advanced in years, would take upon herself the entire 3management of the home, nor would they conduct it so economically as one's own mother. Then too, no one else would give the children the same care as a grandmother gives her grandchildren, and no one else but the mother would shield her daughter so carefully from the daily domestic cares. Instead of spending her declining years peacefully and quietly in "grandmother's room", she is aging amid the troubles of everyday life because her daughter who works for a living has other duties. And in spite of this, she is only a secondary figure in the household. She is a help and a support in the home, but first place belongs to the daughter, especially if that daughter is "famous." Very few people, when paying homage to such a "famous" daughter, think of how much she owes to her mother--that "old woman of bygone years" who never was anything but a mother and a housewife. And the daughters, whether they are geniuses or just average working women, forget too, how much their mothers mean to them. Nobody talks about it.

    "The household is conducted by Mother!" Naturally, it is understood that it could not be otherwise. But it must not be forgotten that beside this working 4mother, a new generation of working women is growing up--her daughters. And when grandmother becomes weak and ill, or, what is worse, dies, what then? Who then will manage the household?

    If everyone engages in the struggle for existence, if mothers, still young and strong, cannot or will not give up their work, who will care for them at home? For home to the working woman, just as to a man, is the quiet refuge of peace and happiness. No recreation, no outside activity, can take the place of the quiet peace of home. But working women owe their peace and happiness mostly to their mothers--the women of yesteryear. These mothers are indispensable to their daughters, making everything easier for them, and in many cases making it possible for them to find outside work.

    Despite all this, unfortunately, it often happens that these "mothers of yesteryear" are spoken of as something out of place. They do not earn money, so they do not count at all. It must be called to mind, therefore, that these uneducated, unfamed, simple mothers of long ago help their daughters 5earn their living by untiring love and care.

    The rising generation of daughters, already trained professionally, may say one day, when their mothers fail to render the same sort of service in the home:

    "How good Grandmother was! Too bad she is gone--too bad mother isn't like her!"

    Some people claim that there is no longer a "married women's problem", but that there remains a girls' and widows' problem as far as their places in business and professional ...

    Polish
    I K, I B 3 c, I B 3 b
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 02, 1918
    "Pernikova Chaloupka"

    Last night Sokol Chicago celebrated the twenty-first anniversary of the foundation of the Vojta Naprstek school, in its hall on South Kedzie Avenue near 24th Street. The program consisted of three parts: J. Srp, a pupil in the fourth grade of the school, recited a prologue; Miss R. Martinek recited a poem, "Magic Whistles"; and the fairy tale "Pernikova Chaloupka" (Gingerbread Hut) was presented in dramatized form and in verses. Albert J. Havranek [news writer], who has interpolated numerous Czech folk songs, arranged the fairy tale.

    The tale tells about two broomstickmakers' children, who, having broken a pot of milk, were sent to the forest to gather strawberries as a kind of punishment. They lose their way, and are caught and held by a witch in a gingerbread 2house, who wants to roast and eat them. The children save themselves by their wits: they shove the witch into the oven.

    The school children who made up the cast performed commendably. A chorus of 130 children, all pupils of the school, sang the folk songs. Dances were also presented by the children under the direction of Miss M. Krametbaur.

    The teachers of the school deserve to be singled out for praise for their task of training the children, for the performance was not an easy one. Mr. F. Vlach, one of the staff, bore the brunt of the hard work.

    The house was sold out, and the performers were rewarded with heart-felt applause.

    Last night Sokol Chicago celebrated the twenty-first anniversary of the foundation of the Vojta Naprstek school, in its hall on South Kedzie Avenue near 24th Street. The program consisted of ...

    Bohemian
    II B 1 c 1, II B 3, I A 2 a, II B 1 a, II B 1 c 2
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 02, 1918
    [Aliens Who Seek Exemption from Military Service] (Editorial)

    All our fellow countrymen who are not citizens, and who on that ground ask for exemption from military service, are, thereby, proclaiming themselves to be "alien enemies". They ought to think the matter over very thoroughly before deciding to take the step. By asking exemption they announce themselves as belonging to the "undesirable element", as people who consider the United States to be a country just good enough for making money. They show that they would not make any sacrifices for the preservation of existing conditions or for their betterment.

    These people testify that they are nothing more than greedy egoists and parasites. They should not be astonished if this country seeks to get rid of them at the earliest opportunity. People of that caliber place the interest of their insignificant ego above that of the American people. They place their 2interest above that of the Czech people from which they issued, and also above that of all mankind to whom victory over the Teutons will mean a blessing.

    Much has been written and babbled among our people about our Czech and American consciousness. This is the time for a showdown. May the proof be a splendid success which will do us honor and fill us with joy. May it not bring shame upon us, and cast deep gloom over our minds!

    All our fellow countrymen who are not citizens, and who on that ground ask for exemption from military service, are, thereby, proclaiming themselves to be "alien enemies". They ought to ...

    Bohemian
    I G, I C
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 02, 1918
    War Saving Stamps (Advertisement)

    Our country is engaged in a war which must be won. The thing most needed to attain this victory is money, which must be supplied by the people of this country. In order to have this money to provide as a loan to the Government, you must save. This money draws interest and, at the same time, you are assured the greatest possible security.

    Full page advertisement donated by Denní Hlasatel Printing and Publishing Company, 1545 West 18th Street, Chicago, Illinois.

    Our country is engaged in a war which must be won. The thing most needed to attain this victory is money, which must be supplied by the people of this ...

    Bohemian
    I G

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  • Svenska Kuriren -- January 03, 1918
    Public Meeting (Editorial)

    Swedish-American Ladies Society of Chicago, which has taken upon itself to furnish the "U.S. Government" with a fully equipped Red Cross Ambulance, has announced a large patriotic meeting to be held in Butler House 3212 Broadway, Thursday, Jan. 10th at 8:00 o'clock P.M. At this meeting Mrs. Fletcher Dobyn will speak on the Red Cross work. The Swedish Ladies Trio will render a few of their many beautiful songs. Everybody is invited to be present at this meeting and learn what their ladies are doing, and what is left to be done. Admission is free and it is highly desirable, that every Swedish woman, who reads this invitation, harken to the call for this patriotic cause.

    Swedish-American Ladies Society of Chicago, which has taken upon itself to furnish the "U.S. Government" with a fully equipped Red Cross Ambulance, has announced a large patriotic meeting to be ...

    Swedish
    II B 2 g, I K, I G
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 03, 1918
    Bohemian National Cemetery (Summary)

    The regular meeting of the delegates of the Bohemian National Cemetery Association was held last night in the hall of the Cesko-Slovanska Podporující Spolecnost (Czecho-Slovac Benevolent Association), at 18th and May Streets. Candidates for the various committees were nominated. From the results it appears that members will be almost the same as last year. Mr. Jan recha, the resent president of the Association, and Mr. Joseph Ringl, vice-president, were nominated unanimously and without debate. Mr. B. Vacek, secretary, and Mr. Victor H. Filip, treasurer, were also nominated to succeed themselves. Messrs. Joseph Jurka and Joseph A. Smejkal accepted nomination as members of the executive committee, whose terms are for two years. Messrs. Fr. Boucek, Frydl, and Spevak will be candidates for the one year term on that committee.

    2

    Messrs. Jan Klaus, Jos. Kriz, and Albert Machacek were nominated for the auditing committee.

    Mr. L. Tuma, manager, submitted the financial report, in the absence of the regular bookkeeper, Mr. Husak who was sick. There were forty-eight workmen employed last month, who received a total of $3,226.76 in wages.

    A letter from the County committee of the Ceske Narodni Sdruzeni (Czech National Alliance) was read. It informed the meeting that Mr. Laler, a member of the County committee, was sent to plead for another contribution, such as has been granted annually by the Cemetery Association to the Alliance. Mr. Laler emphasized the need of necessary funds for the maintenance of the Czechoslovak Army in France [originated and sponsored by the Alliance]. lively debate ensued, after which it was resolved that the Cemetery executive committee should adhere to the original agreement [which is not stated in this 3article], and that the matter should be postponed until a final decision on the amount of the contribution could be reached. The Cemetery committee declared, however, that it intends to grant the highest amount possible.

    Routine business was then disposed of.....

    Mr. Smejkal pointed out that the operating costs of the crematory are high, and that the plant is not being used as frequently as it was at first expected. The reason for this appears to be, he said, that the public is not sufficiently informed nor acquainted with the building. The latter contains one large hall, which may be rented to visitors for as little an amount as $5, while another, a smaller one, is placed at the disposal of mourning guests free of charge. Proper advertising and agitation among our people will induce them to make better use of the Cemetery's facilities.....

    4

    The treasury report of the Cemetery [period not stated] was: income, $11,865.85; loss from last account, $151.03; expenses, $6,899.61; and, the balance in the treasury, $4,815.21. This report was also acknowledged.

    The regular meeting of the delegates of the Bohemian National Cemetery Association was held last night in the hall of the Cesko-Slovanska Podporující Spolecnost (Czecho-Slovac Benevolent Association), at 18th and ...

    Bohemian
    II D 1, I G, I C, III B 2
  • Svenska Kuriren -- January 03, 1918
    Birger Osland Appointed Captain (Editorial)

    p.11.......Last week we were informed that Birger Osland, of the firm Birger Osland & Co., Western General Agents of the Norwegian America S/S Line, had been appointed Captain of Infantry in the National Army, with orders to report for duty immediately.

    Mr. Osland has been for many years well-known in this city, and is a member of several organizations, such as the Norwegia Club, the Swedish Club and others.

    Our countryman, Sigurd H.Henning, who has been with said firm for about a year as Chief Clerk, before which time he was with the White Star Line's Office for fourteen years, will manage the firm during Mr. Osland's absence, a task for which he, considering his long experience in this particular field, is fully qualified.

    p.11.......Last week we were informed that Birger Osland, of the firm Birger Osland & Co., Western General Agents of the Norwegian America S/S Line, had been appointed Captain of Infantry ...

    Swedish
    III D