The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Proletarec -- January 02, 1917
    Lecture on Socialism

    The Jugoslav Socialist Club No. 1 in Chicago has shown its educational activity during the winter of this year, by organizing a few very interesting lectures, one of which is on the subject, "Socialism". This lecture proved how little our people know about Socialism, and how badly they need to be educated in Social Science.

    The Jugoslav Socialist Club No. 1 in Chicago has shown its educational activity during the winter of this year, by organizing a few very interesting lectures, one of which is ...

    Slovene
    II B 2 g, I E
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 02, 1917
    Oldest Czech Brotherhood Celebrates

    The spacious hall could hardly accommodate the large crowd in festive mood that surged into the home of the Czecho-Slavonic Benevolent Society to celebrate New Year's eve. This society is the oldest and most widespread Czech brotherhood in the United States. The attendance was much larger than the one at our recent jubilee festival. If there is a deeper sense to be attached to this increase, it may mean an augmented grasp of the brotherhood's value for our public life, and a manifestation of willingness to extend aid to the association, so prosperous for many years, in order to make it grow bigger still.

    The managing committee, consisting of brethren J. Janda, V. Cerny, Mejdrich, Rusin, and Soukup had prepared a program full of variety and artistic values which, though it comprised eighteen numbers, held the attention of 2the crowds to the very end. One of the high points of the affair was the festival oration delivered by brother Vaclav Svarc, of Cleveland, who took the floor after the rendition by Mr. and Mrs. Arno Hess of the national anthem "Kde Domov Muj?" (Where Is My Homeland?), and referred to the song by pointing to its beauty and patriotic spirit, which should, particularly in this momentous era, pervade every Czech soul and stimulate them to patriotic sacrifice. The speaker said that he belonged to twenty different societies, but that he would not hesitate to belong to the C. S. P. S. if he had the choice of one only. The reason for this, he proclaimed is not only because the society guarantees so many benefits, but because it represents a link between the people and the nation, and has contributed in great measure to our prosperity in America and to the sustenance of patriotic feeling in our new homeland. This country, he 3admonished the gathering, has not only great fortunes, but many temptations as well in store, which fact should urge us to combine all our strength to properly fulfill our national duties. He continued: "We Czech-Americans are a mere reflex of the Czechs of the old country, but must be mindful of the precious heritage from our forefathers and our great men, and we must fearlessly proclaim our allegiance to our nationality, just as the pioneers and the founders of this association have done. We ought to look up with reverence to our national association help them into prosperity, and finally get rid of the ugly habit of thinking that the foreign associations are better than ours. It is a notion, painful to mention, of some of the parents that they are neglecting their duty when they raise their children in the Czech spirit, and when they do not suppress Czech feeling, as if life were more worth living without it.

    4

    True enough, it seems difficult to prevent our children from becoming denationalized while they are in constant contact with those who speak English, but with some good will we can make them remain loyal to the mother tongue. If the Americans show eagerness to learn foreign tongues, as for instance Russian, it is much more our duty to save our children for the Czech nation. It is to you, Czechs of Chicago, that we look up as the most numerous and prosperous branch of the people; this implies the admonition that you should not forget to use the opportunity given by your riches to do your duty for the welfare of the nation. Just as the poor man is duty bound to his nation, so is the rich man, only to a greater extent. The C. S. P. S. has always done its duty, and its growth shall guarantee the welfare of the great Czech-American family."

    5

    After these words in the Czech language, Mr. Svarz addressed the adolescent, who were strongly represented in the English language; he gave them a sincere talk which was frequently interrupted by salvos of applause as was his main speech.

    The brilliant success of yesterday's celebration will be an inspiration to further national activities for all of us.

    The spacious hall could hardly accommodate the large crowd in festive mood that surged into the home of the Czecho-Slavonic Benevolent Society to celebrate New Year's eve. This society is ...

    Bohemian
    II D 1, III A, I A 1 b, III B 2
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 02, 1917
    School Progress Evident at Festival

    The Vojta Naprstek School is one of the best of our liberal schools; its teaching staff is making honest efforts to draw the attention of the broader strata of the Czech population of Chicago to the system it follows in the education of our boys and girls. This end is served in an excellent manner by festivities, during which there is exhibited much of the work done by the pupils.

    The twentieth annual festivity in the history of the institute was held yesterday in the main hall of the Sokol Chicago on 24th Street and Kedzie Avenue and proved a success in every respect.

    2

    A prologue recited by Lillian Dolezal opened the evening; it was followed by poems and songs rendered by pupils of the first preparatory class under the tutorship of Mrs. Weiner; the first higher class under Mrs. Kovar, the second class, and the Saturday and Sunday classes were next. "Pohadka o Jaru" (A Spring Tale), by Herma Pilbaur, the well-known writer of plays for children, and Vzachy Kolovratev (The Precious Spinning Wheel), followed by pictures of the National festival in Kladruby, Bohemia, gave more than ample opportunity to the pupils to demonstrate that the work done by the teachers was crowned with success. It would not be fair to single out for praise some of the pupils while all of them deserve to be commended.

    Special mention must be made, however, of the teachers F. Vlach and 3Bohumil Hladky, the latter the "daddie" of the Vojta Naprstek school. The school has reached its present high level under the guidance of Mr. Hladky, who draws for experience from actual life and takes not much stock in rigid rules or continual reforms. Not less meritorious is the activity, as concerned with the festival, of Miss Milada Krametbauer, to whom was intrusted the laborious task of training the children for the dances. The excellent orchestra under the baton of Mr. Brousek supplied the music.

    The Vojta Naprstek School is one of the best of our liberal schools; its teaching staff is making honest efforts to draw the attention of the broader strata of the ...

    Bohemian
    II B 2 f, III A
  • Proletarec -- January 02, 1917
    Lecture on Socialism

    The Jugoslav Socialist club No. 1 in Chicago has shown its educational activity during the winter of this year by organizing a few very interesting lectures, one of which is on the subject, "Socialism". This lecture proved how little our people knew about Socialism, and how badly they need to be educated in Social Science.

    The Jugoslav Socialist club No. 1 in Chicago has shown its educational activity during the winter of this year by organizing a few very interesting lectures, one of which is ...

    Slovene
    II B 2 g, I E
  • Naujienos -- January 03, 1917
    The Social of the Young Lithuanian Socialists' League by Stanley Narkis

    The First Chapter of the Young Lithuanian Socialists' League held a social at the Aurora Hall on December 31.

    The purpose of the affair was to provide the League's members with an opportunity to greet the New Year joyously.

    Many guests were invited and most of them came. This shows that the Young Lithuanian Socialists' League is influential among the progressive youth. Among the prominent guests were Mr. and Mrs. Dundulis, J. Sirutis, and the dental student, A. Zymontas. Before the dinner, which took place about midnight, the members amused themselves with dancing and games. During the dinner various guests and members made speeches and offered various 2greetings. Miss S. Vitarcius and Miss O. Kalvaitis recited poetry. P.F. Alekna played a violin solo, which was well rendered.

    After the dinner and program the dancing and games continued until four o'clock in the morning. I must say that the party was very successful and the youth will remember it for a long time.

    I should like to tell the young people that the Chapter will strive to present something even better in the future. The dramatic presentations committee of the Chapter is actively preparing for the presentation of the play "The Murderers" on March 11 at Pulaski Hall.

    This is all the news from the Young Lithuanian Socialists' League.

    The First Chapter of the Young Lithuanian Socialists' League held a social at the Aurora Hall on December 31. The purpose of the affair was to provide the League's members ...

    Lithuanian
    I E, III E, II B 1 c 1
  • Naujienos -- January 03, 1917
    Lithuanian Women's Group Plans Gathering (Advertisement)

    For the first time, Chapter 28 of the Lithuanian Women's Progressive Alliance will sponsor a program with speeches and entertainment at Prospect Building Hall, 1152 North Ashland Avenue (corner of Division Street), Sunday, January 7, 1917. The program will begin at 2 P. M. Admission will be free to all.

    The speakers will be the widely known Lithuanian leader, Mrs. M. Jurgelionis, and Mr. T. L. Dundulis, financial secretary of the Lithuanian Assistance Fund.

    Singers, declaimers, pianists, and other musicians will appear on the program. The committee invites the public to attend.

    For the first time, Chapter 28 of the Lithuanian Women's Progressive Alliance will sponsor a program with speeches and entertainment at Prospect Building Hall, 1152 North Ashland Avenue (corner of ...

    Lithuanian
    II D 1, IV, III B 2
  • Jewish Labor World -- January 03, 1917
    The Results of the Zionist Convention in Chicago (Editorial)

    The Twenty-first Annual Convention of the Zionist Organizations of the Middle West did not change the position of the prominent Zionists as to a program for the betterment of the Jewish masses.

    Zionism became a weapon against justice and peace, on account of its association with politicians of this country. It is no accident that the leading political reactionary, the editor of Halsted Street (Courier) is the chairman of the Zionist Executive Committee. It is also in the spirit of the new course of political Zionism that of the three Chicago vice presidents, one is a judge, who has given out injunctions against strikers, and another, is theworst enemy of organized labor and radicals in Chicago.

    2

    There is also no doubt that the Zion leader of Chicago, whom Jack De Haas promises to send to rule Palestine will belong to the political machine of Halsted Street.....an enemy of the Jewish working masses and a defender of reaction.

    The Zionist Convention spoke much about the posterity of Palestine, but hardly anything about the present condition of the Jewish race. Can they demand national equality for the Russian Jews now? Can they adopt a program of Jewish public schools, high schools and institution for higher education in America? And here is where their spirit is shown to be bankrupt. For the present, the Zionist leaders of Chicago Avenue, with very few exception, thoroughtly assimilated.

    3

    They neither teach their children Yiddish nor Hebrew. Their entire Judaism is limited to the reactionary periodical, in Yiddish, through which they seek to buy and sell the Jewish vote in times of election.

    They are not interested in the afflictions of the poor. The high cost of living does not concern them. They do not sympathize with the poor masses, who are not weeping in the midst of world destruction, they build their fortunes upon graves and publicly show their joy with the present condition, from which they procure their spiritual and material power.

    The common people who go to hear words of redemption, the beautiful sermons of Schmarya Levin and M. Schenkin, will be bitterly disgusted when the spirit of the present convention will die and their suffering will begin anew.

    4

    Then the wall of Zionism will be the greatest bulwark against the labor organization.

    On one side of the wall stand those who are in midst of idoltry of the bloody angel and the golden calf, and on the other side stand those who strive for the sacred spirit of justice and peace.

    The Twenty-first Annual Convention of the Zionist Organizations of the Middle West did not change the position of the prominent Zionists as to a program for the betterment of the ...

    Jewish
    I G, II B 2 d 1, I E, III G
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 04, 1917
    Czechs Urged to Participate in Allied Bazaar

    Only a few days separate us from one of the greatest humanitarian social events. All of you have learned about the Allied bazaar, in which one division is reserved for the Czechs and Slovaks. In that affair, which is to be held in the Coliseum, we will stand in the limelight before a severe forum, in which we will be given the opportunity to demonstrate that we are a mature nation, that we Czechs and Slovaks of Chicago are one solid unit, and that our heart is in the right spot.

    Every Czech and Slovak ought to be supplied with tickets for his whole family by this time. This paper has taken care of their sale and it has otherwise fulfilled its duties by printing a long series of articles for 2the sake of publicity for the bazaar. Will this bear fruit? Perhaps every reader of the Hlasatel has bought his ticket by this time; it often happens, however, that the date of the purchase is postponed and time for the advance sale passes. The price for the ticket is only twenty-five cents; it will be fifty cents shortly. Why then wait and pay twice as much when some persons are loath to part with half a dollar?

    In the bazaar there will be exhibited all sorts of weapons, airplanes Allied and German, a replica of an English village, even a Zeppelin, and many other objects worth inspecting.

    The bazaar will not limit itself to the exhibits mentioned; it will 3contain articles of manufacture of a great number of countries, and the Czechs and Slovaks will occupy one big tent each. Visitors can make their day in the bazaar a memorable one by buying one of the beautiful souvenirs.

    Only a few days separate us from one of the greatest humanitarian social events. All of you have learned about the Allied bazaar, in which one division is reserved for ...

    Bohemian
    I G, I C, II B 1 c 3, I C
  • Svenska Kuriren -- January 04, 1917
    [Swedish Film Shown]

    p.11................The Swedish Red Cross received a considerable sum from the Swedish Film which a few weeks ago were so fully exhibited at Orchestra Hall and Strand Theatre.

    Its Director, Charles S. Peterson, whose guarantee of subsidy for these "Film Forestallningor" (filmings), brought about this showing.

    Director Peterson has sent to Sweden the sum of $486.47, which sum is to be equally divided between the Red Cross and Crown Princess' War Fund.

    p.11................The Swedish Red Cross received a considerable sum from the Swedish Film which a few weeks ago were so fully exhibited at Orchestra Hall and Strand Theatre. Its Director, Charles ...

    Swedish
    II B 2 e, I G, II D 10
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 04, 1917
    Editor Explains Wilson's Attitude

    The Germans of this town have suddenly changed their opinion about President Wilson. "The British Clodpole," as he was dubbed by them, has now become a "secret ally" of the Teutonic powers. We think that the President ponders only about means to avoid the danger of America's being drawn into the tangle while we are not prepared for war. The "friendly" visit by the U-boat "U-53" proves that Germany could transfer its activities to this side of the Atlantic ocean and damage business along our shores. This is the reason why he is making efforts to end the war. Nobody doubts his pacifistic intentions, but the nations fighting the Teutons are faced with a question of life or death, and so cannot afford to listen to voices clamoring for peace. They will rather seek to give better protection to the ships which carry the business between the United States and Eurppe, so as to calm the nerves of our capitalists, whose influence in the peace movement is clearly seen.

    The Germans of this town have suddenly changed their opinion about President Wilson. "The British Clodpole," as he was dubbed by them, has now become a "secret ally" of the ...

    Bohemian
    I G

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