The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Svenska Kuriren -- January 01, 1914
    The Bethesda Sick Benefit Society

    The Bethesda Sick Benefit Society of Hyde Park held its annual meeting last Saturday night. The following officers were elected: chairman: Doctor V. H. Hegstrom; vice-chairman: C. G. Norman; secretary: Signe Elverson; financial secretary: Oscar Johnson; treasurer: Matila Carlson. The society is planning to hold a Washington Festival, February 21.

    The Bethesda Sick Benefit Society of Hyde Park held its annual meeting last Saturday night. The following officers were elected: chairman: Doctor V. H. Hegstrom; vice-chairman: C. G. Norman; secretary: ...

    Swedish
    II D 2
  • Svenska Kuriren -- January 01, 1914
    A Christmas Feast

    On last Sunday at Orchestra Hall, a very attractive program was presented.

    Professor Emil Larson played several Swedish folk melodies on the organ. The Swedish Glee Club, directed by Professor Dahlen, sang several numbers and so did Knut Sjoberg, a baritone. "King Oscar's farewell to Sweden" was recited by director Behmer. A moving picture, with sceneries from Sweden and Chicago concluded the program.

    On last Sunday at Orchestra Hall, a very attractive program was presented. Professor Emil Larson played several Swedish folk melodies on the organ. The Swedish Glee Club, directed by Professor ...

    Swedish
    II B 1 a, II B 2 e
  • Svenska Kuriren -- January 01, 1914
    Frans Albin Lindstrand (Obituary)

    Frans Albin Lindstrand, former Editor of the Swedish-American died Christmas Eve. He was also the founder of The Swedish National Society with its free employment bureau and charity work. He was born in Sweden in 1847, and has been a resident in Chicago since 1871.

    Frans Albin Lindstrand, former Editor of the Swedish-American died Christmas Eve. He was also the founder of The Swedish National Society with its free employment bureau and charity work. He ...

    Swedish
    II D 10, IV, II D 8
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- January 02, 1914
    The Knights of Zion Opened Their 17th Annual Convention Yesterday.

    Yesterday at one p. m. the doors of the large hall of the Chicago Hebrew Institute was thrown open to the two hundred delegates and a large visiting audience which filled the large hall and the balcony.

    Among the speakers were Rabbi Berlin and Mr. Barondes who were highly applauded after their speeches.

    With great enthusiasm the audience listened to the reports of the past year's activities.

    On the platform sat all the Chicago rabbis and well known social workers, among them Mr. Philip Seman, the superintendent of the Chicago Hebrew Institute, who welcomed the delegates in the name of the Institute.....

    2

    The independent nationalistic sentiment is growing among the Jewish masses who are being urged to arouse themselves to national consciousness and become a nation again equal with all other nations and to cease to be a wanderer among the nations by turning back to his own land.

    The grandmaster then called on the secretary of the Mizrachi, Rabbi Berlin, who was greeted with thundering applause. He spoke of the present Jewish situation, the general condition of the Zionist movement, and as the leader of the Mizrachi movement in America he indirectly pointed out the aims and the principles of this orthodox Zionist alliance. He also pointed out that the sooner Zionism will take to more practical work in Palestine, the sooner this sacred ideal will be materialized.

    3

    After the secretary's report on the past activities of the order the treasurer reported on the financial conditions. Mr. Schulman, the grandmaster, started reading telegrams and letters of prominent men of the Zionist movement such as from the young Straus, in the name of his father, the well known social worker and lover of Zion, Nathan Straus; a second letter from the famous Boston lawyer and Zionist, Louis Brandeis, and one from Professor Boris Shatz of the Bezalel Art School in Palestine, who is now in New York.

    The question then arose as to the language to be taught in Palestine, and it was unanimously agreed that Hebrew shall be the language.

    4

    Last night a large audience gathered at the West Side Masonic Temple at the banquet of the Order Knights of Zion given in honor of the delegates and guests.

    After they were through with the palatable meal they started with the spiritual part of the banquet. Good speakers were heard, the enthusiastic audience pledged large donations toward the Jewish edifice being built in Palestine.

    Mr. Schulman, the toastmaster, introduced the new grandmaster who briefly pointed out the necessity for this great gathering and mentioned the progress of the past year made by the Order, the Knights of Zion.

    5

    Then Philip Bregstone, Judge Fisher, Dr. and Mrs. Levinson, in the name of the Hadassah Chapter, spoke.

    Mr. Baronet, the last speaker made an appeal and money and checks came in large sums from all sides. Baronet then declared the convention adjourned and every one went home happy.

    Yesterday at one p. m. the doors of the large hall of the Chicago Hebrew Institute was thrown open to the two hundred delegates and a large visiting audience which ...

    Jewish
    III B 4, IV, III H, II D 10, III B 2
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 02, 1914
    New Year's Gifts of the Atlas Brewing Company

    The management of the popular Atlas Brewery does not fail to remember our important welfare and national institutions each year, and so this New Year it did not make any exception. Generous New Year's gifts with which the Brewery remembered our foremost institutions are to the Sbor Utulny a Syrotcince (The Old People's Home and Orphanage Association), $100; Syrotcinec Svateho Josefa (Saint Joseph Orphanage), $100; Cesko Americka Tiskova Kancelar (Bohemian American Press Bureau), $50; Ceska Dobrocinna Spolecnost (Bohemian Charitable Association), $50; and Ustredni Matice Skolska Cechach (Central Scholastic Association in Bohemia), 200 crowns.

    The management of the popular Atlas Brewery does not fail to remember our important welfare and national institutions each year, and so this New Year it did not make any ...

    Bohemian
    II A 2, III H, II D 5, II D 4, II D 10
  • Revyen -- January 03, 1914
    Christmas Parties

    Practically all Danish societies in the city arranged Christmas parties for members and their families, and, needless to say, a good time was had by all.

    To many of these parties the public was invited, and the attendance was unusually good.

    Practically all Danish societies in the city arranged Christmas parties for members and their families, and, needless to say, a good time was had by all. To many of these ...

    Danish
    III B 3 b
  • Skandinaven -- January 03, 1914
    Real-Estate Transactions

    The following Scandinavians bought or sold real estate in Chicago recently:

    Gustav Hallberg to Nicolas E. Mueller: Irving and Bertrand Avenues. Price, $900.

    Knute T. S. Knutson to Teddy Mozuarkos: Armitage and 40th Avenues. Price, $2,650.

    Soren S. Pallesen to Joseph Kledzik: 44th Court and Humboldt Boulevard. Price, $1.

    John W. Campbell to Oscar E. Nelson: Springfield and Sunnyside Avenues. Price, $10.

    Oscar W. Carlson to Otto Newberg: Fairfield Avenue and Hirsch Street. Price, $10.

    2

    Ernest Silberschlag to C. Hermanson: 1101 North Ridgeway Avenue. Price, $10.

    Dora Arntzen to Marsilus Thorgrimson: Talman Avenue and Le Moyne Street. Price, $1.

    Harriet Keeney to F. O. Lundahl: 54th Court and Le Moyne Street. Price, $3.50.

    The following Scandinavians bought or sold real estate in Chicago recently: Gustav Hallberg to Nicolas E. Mueller: Irving and Bertrand Avenues. Price, $900. Knute T. S. Knutson to Teddy Mozuarkos: ...

    Norwegian
    II F
  • Scandia -- January 03, 1914
    Borgny Hammer

    It was a great disappointment to us when we learned that Mrs. Borgny Hammer was retiring from the local Norwegian stage after a futile attempt to interest the public in her plays.

    After many years of constant observation of the best on the American stage and a thorough study of the methods of such fine actresses as Mrs. Fiske, Ether Barrymore, Kalich, and Bernhardt, we find that Mrs. Hammer lacks nothing in technique, emotion, and character delineation. Her forte is tragedy, so well demonstrated in "Agnete".

    We wish to express our hope for her great success in her forthcoming appearance in "Hedda Gabler" at Maurice Broune's Little Theater, where they know good art when they see it.

    It was a great disappointment to us when we learned that Mrs. Borgny Hammer was retiring from the local Norwegian stage after a futile attempt to interest the public in ...

    Norwegian
    II A 3 d 1, IV
  • La Parola dei Socialisti -- January 03, 1914
    To the Italians of Chicago

    Until to-day we believed that Mr. Bolognesi was the best and most independent man ever placed at the head of the Italian Consulate in Chicago. Until to-day we believed him to be (after his repeated assertions), politically neutral, without any preferences of personal political ideas.

    But to-day, we do not believe so. His diplomatic tact has failed him and he openly reveals himself to us and to the intelligent part of our colony as a real papist and clerical.

    None of us would contest his right to open a shelter to provide beds and meals for the unfortunate in distress, who have been thrown in the street by unemployment these past months, unemployment caused by a social system which the Consul defends officially and privately.

    The right which we strongly contest is that of entrusting this new benevolent institution to the Sisters of the Sacred Heart. We contest his right to use the Italian government's money, money of the people, to protect (under the appearance of beneficence) his own clerical ideals.

    2

    We contest his right to give Rome the impression that in Chicago it is possible to help the poor people only through the interference of priests, monks, or nuns.

    We question the validity of the opinion that people believe that what he has done was the only thing that could be done.

    Mr. Bolognesi never has openly revealed his views on public welfare, except to a few persons to whom he has expressed himself privately. And now, after an accomplished deed, he announces in the newspapers that starving Italians may have, from now on, a bowl of soup-thanks to consular-monastic charity.

    How can Mr. Bolognesi say that no other way was open to him? Was it not an insult to the other existing beneficent institutions of our colony that he completely ignored them? But he has clerical sympathies and so he chose the only way possible.

    Our clever Consul is perfectly free to be clerical as long as he wishes; but the most independent and intelligent Italians of Chicago will not overlook 3that provocation, and will oppose such policies with an energetic anti-clerical movement.

    Our objection is not that we do not attribute the right importance to the new institution as such, but that several hundred dollars of the Italian government's money, obtained by the witty diplomatic clericalism of Mr. Bolognesi, will be used for Catholic propaganda through the medium of a bowl of soup.

    We stand for the principle of the thing, but we rightfully maintain that it is time for the representative of Italy to stop using the money of the Italian government to give help to the Catholic Church, the defrauder of our colonies.

    The time has arrived for anti-clerical Italians to arouse themselves, organize and fight.

    The impurity of the Catholic influx to this country is becoming more insufferable and repugnant. Its everlasting insincerity is that it operates not for the good but for the purpose of extending its pestilential influence.

    4

    As an example, consider the activities here in America of the Catholic Church in establishing grammar schools in opposition to the [secular] public schools. It is certainly admirable to teach children; however, the priests perform that task not for the good of it, but as a chance for propaganda. And this our priests, in their Italo-American schools, are anti-Italians for the original sin, and anti-Americans for their daily acts.

    Take notice of them in their hospitals and orphanages, in their welfare institutions; they always use the same deceitful hypocrisy. In one hand a piece of bread, and in the other hand the Crucifix; and before you can bite the piece of bread, you must kiss the Crucifix. Beautiful sentiment of charity! Was that the teaching of Christ?

    It is better to starve than to bite the bait on the hook as the fish do. This is the way the free thinkers of our colony are thinking and they will try to expend all their energies to denounce the ignoble and everlasting trickery of the priests and nuns.

    Until to-day we believed that Mr. Bolognesi was the best and most independent man ever placed at the head of the Italian Consulate in Chicago. Until to-day we believed him ...

    Italian
    III H, IV, I E, III C, II D 4, II D 3, II D 10, I D 2 c, I A 2 a
  • La Parola dei Socialisti -- January 03, 1914
    Open Letter to the Italian Consul

    Mr. Consul:

    What is happening in our colony compels me to reveal to you, in chronological order, the actual events taking place.

    These events are of such importance that they cannot be overlooked; as you know, the public should know the truth and should not be deceived as was the case when the Italian newspapers of Chicago, without knowledge of the real facts, filled various columns with incorrect statements, foolishness, and lies.

    Two or three weeks ago, the American newspapers made much ado over the news that the Italian Government, through its representative, Count G. Bolognesi, had rented a four-story building and furnished it with thirty beds, so that the poor people of our colony who are without any resources, could be sheltered and fed.

    2

    We are not interested in the American press, but we would like to talk about the Italian newspapers. Do you think, Mr. Consul, that they are interested in protecting our honor and dignity? Certainly not. If they were, they would not say so much about the Lodging House.

    Why don't the newspapermen personally investigate the facts before writing their long articles? In expressing their own opinions to the public it is necessary that they be well informed, and aware of what they want to publish; we are sure that if they had followed our advice, they would not have printed so many lies, lies which are damaging our colony.

    Since it appears that we are lacking in honest newspapermen, I will assume the task and will try to do my best. Aroused by the curiosity to see the celebrated Lodging House established by the Italian Government through its representative in this city, last Friday I went in search of that welfare institution; but I could not find it-because it was not located on the street announced by the newspapers. The next day, Saturday, I finally found it-not on Little Street-but at 802 Centre Avenue-now Racine Avenue-.

    3

    It is not a four-story but a three-story building, and not all three floors are occupied by our indigent countrymen: the second and third floors are rented to private families. Thus only one floor, the first, is used for lodging. On this floor were crowded about fifty persons. It was about 10 A. M. when I arrived, and soup was being served. Every one was seated. Two or three were acting as waiters.

    A gentleman, a representative of Count Bolognesi, maintained order. At his request, I informed him that I was an Italian interested in seeing the place, I remained until the end of the meal. Thus I had the opportunity of seeing the quality of the soup that was served. The soup looked like dish water and it contained only a few pieces of broken macaroni of inferior quality. Four or five (wafer-thin) slices of bread completed the meal. Meals are served twice a day: at 10:30 A. M., and at 4:30 P. M. There is an interval of about nineteen (sic) hours between supper and the morning meal of the next day.

    I asked about the beds, and the representative of Count Bolognesi replied that the beds were not ready yet; but he could not tell me the reason. I thought: Perhaps the beds were ordered from a high-grade factory which 4specializes in high-grade beds, the only kind appropriate for a government shelter.

    The space used as a dormitory is not adequate for the needs, unless they consider the floor as a mattress and the roof as a blanket.

    Poor unfortunates! For two weeks they have lived this life. And all the newspapers are boasting to the public about the wonderful "Lodging House." And do you know why, most illustrious Count? Because you had the wonderful idea of availing yourself of your contact with the clerical gang.

    And before I ask you a few questions I would like to advise the readers and newspapermen of Chicago that they will accomplish a good deed if they will personally investigate [the conditions in the Shelter]. They will verify my contention that it is only a scheme to gain money to fatten those Sisters of the Sacred Heart.

    However, the press said that this Lodging House-not yet operating, incidentally-was financed by the Italian Government (with money collected from unfortunate Italian people); but to-day, subscription lists are being circulated among the Italians for that purpose.

    5

    Why do they not make themselves clear? Whose is the responsibility of supporting the Shelter, the Government's, or the colony's? If it is the colony's duty, [we ask,] how many welfare institutions must it support? Do you not think it time to stop such schemes? The colony is financially exhausted already. Who must take care of the shelter, the Italian Women's Society, or the Sisters of the Sacred Heart?

    We do not understand any thing any more. Too much confusion. And all this makes matters worse for the unfortunates in need, and ignorant people, who bite the bait only because some self-styled "Big Shot" makes a financial donation-not for any altruistic sentiment he might have-but only to make himself [favorably] conspicuous.

    You ask for proof? You want to know who these patriotic "Big Shots" are? Anything they have done or are doing, they do to help the priests and nuns, not to help the poor people.

    Ask those "Big Shots," if they ever gave any help to Hull House! And yet this institution has done much more good than all the priests and nuns.

    6

    Nine year ago, an Evangelical Mission was on Clark St., and Marquis Petacci was the pastor. During the winter, more than one hundred needy were sheltered and fed there. But the press and the self-styled conspicous people did not pay any attention to that.

    At the Evangelic Church on Polk and Sholto Street, I had the opportunity to notice that the pastor, Mr. Petacci, did not forget to help the poor Italians in need with milk, clothing, shoes, etc. But not one of the "Big-Shots" paid any tribute to Mr. Petacci. Do you understand, Count Bolognesi?

    But when your dear friend Father Gambara is doing a very small deed, you hear much "toad-croaking," and the Royal Consul works hard to bestow upon Father Gambara the Cross of the Crown of Italy.

    In concluding, I beg the Italians of Chicago to co-operate with me, financially and morally, in offering a floral tribute of garlic and onions to our illustrious Count, as a token of our gratitude to the "greatest benefactor" of the Italians of Chicago.

    (Signed) G. Orrico.

    Mr. Consul: What is happening in our colony compels me to reveal to you, in chronological order, the actual events taking place. These events are of such importance that they ...

    Italian
    III H, I E, III C, I D 2 c, II B 2 d 1