The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Bicz Bozy -- January 01, 1912
    A Strict Celibacy

    When Bishop Rhode was conducting the inspection of his diocese, he stopped unexpectedly at a certain parish, where he noticed two little fat boys playing in the yard on a pile of sand.

    "Whose children are they?" asked the bishop, eyeing the pastor suspiciously. "They are my brother's children," replied the reverend shepherd, without even the slightest sign of stammering or embarrassment.

    In the meantime the news about the inspection spread all over, with the result that when the archshepherd arrived at the next parish everything was ready for him. At a certain parish, while waiting for the pastor, the bishop took a walk in the parish garden. Suddenly he noticed a group of children hidden in the raspberry bushes. "Whose children are you?" asked the bishop. "The Millers," answered the children, who were well trained. "And where is your daddy," asked the puzzled bishop. "Oh! he went to a sick man with the Lord."

    When Bishop Rhode was conducting the inspection of his diocese, he stopped unexpectedly at a certain parish, where he noticed two little fat boys playing in the yard on a ...

    Polish
    III C, IV
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 02, 1912
    New Year Festivities of the Grand Lodge of the Cesko-Slovanska Jednota

    Yesterday's New Year celebration of the large, benevolent and nationalistic organization, Cesko-Slovanska Jednota (Czecho-Slavonic Society), was a genuine manifestation.

    This New Year's celebration has been an annual event for many years and is arranged by the Grand Lodge of the society with the aid of the subordinate lodges of Chicago and vicinity. The celebration yesterday was somewhat a preliminary to the festive day in May, at which time the society will celebrate its twentieth anniversary. Twenty years of activity! How much good it has done in that period is known best by the public. Yes, indeed, the society has been active among Czechs for that period and is, therefore, rightfully deserving of the greatest respect if we take into consideration the great work which it has done during that time for the welfare of its members and in the national field. Every sincere countryman of ours will welcome with joy the report that the society is entering the New Year with the fullest hope for another twenty years, which will surely be even more fruitful and successful than the past twenty years. The large hall of Pilsen Sokol on Ashland Avenue 2was filled to capacity with members, their friends, and even the general public, all gathered to pay homage to a tireless meritorious work. The program was carefully arranged and served to show the good will of the arrangements committee to provide the audience with the best of entertainment. The celebration began with the playing of a festive march by the orchestra under the direction of Mr. M. Cada. Mr. E. Frydl, Grand Lodge President, spoke briefly, and ended with a wish for much success in the new year. The high light of the program was the festive speech by Dr. Frantisek Iska.....

    Then followed the report of the Grand Lodge Secretary, Mr. Hrvs: "We have had, for many years, a good habit in our society in that we meet on New Year's Day so that we may review what has been accomplished in the past year and what it is necessary to do for the further growth and success of the society. Numerically, our society was enlarged by three societies: Lodge Columbia, initiated on January 5, 1911; Lodge California, initiated on February 13, 1911; and Lodge Lipany, No. 63, initiated on July 21, 1911. In the journal of January 1, 1911, the report of the Secretary, it appears that there were 4,736 3members in December, 1910. In the journal of January, 1912, the membership is listed as 5,220. According to the reports in the journal, the increase amounted to 484 members. To this should be added the initiates for December, numbering 50, making an increase of 534 members. In reality there were 893 members initiated into the society in the past year. This indicates a difference of 359 members between the initiates and the actual growth of the society, and this is accounted for by 66 deaths and 293 dropped for nonpayment of dues or resignations."

    The above report as well as the following report by the Grand Lodge Auditor, Mr. Hribal, were received with praise. Mr. Hribal reported: "Since the founding of the society 621 members have died, having a total insurance of $544,000. The sum of $533,261.67 has been paid out to the beneficiaries of the deceased members, leaving the society with liabilities of $10,739, against which the society has cash on hand, $1,294.80, cash due from subordinate lodges, $4,900, or a total of $6,194.80. Deducting this amount there still remains a liability of $4,544.20. Against this the society has $31,300 in bonds; cash 4in Grand Lodge fund, $1,098.53; accounts payable by subordinate lodges, $1,200, making a total of $33,598.53; after deducting the liability of $4,544.20, there remains a balance of $29,054.33. The number of members on January 1, 1911, was 4,747, on December 1, 1911, it was 5,220, increase in membership for eleven months was 473. Deaths from January 1, 1911 to January 1, 1912, were 66 members. Death benefit payments from January 1, 1911 to January 1, 1912, amounted to $55,750.

    Yesterday's New Year celebration of the large, benevolent and nationalistic organization, Cesko-Slovanska Jednota (Czecho-Slavonic Society), was a genuine manifestation. This New Year's celebration has been an annual event for many ...

    Bohemian
    II D 1
  • Skandinaven -- January 04, 1912
    Real-Estate Transactions

    The following Scandinavians bought or sold real estate in Chicago recently:

    N. C. Biederman to J. A. Lundstrom: Summerdale, lots 5 and 6, block 40. Price, $2,000.

    A. E. Johnson to A. S. Johnson: Kimball and Cullom Avenues. Price, $1.

    Harry G. Epps to Anna F. Carlson: Shouts & Drake Company's Addition, lots 11 and 14, block 2. Price, $10.

    Andrew Carlson to Casie Simpson: Waller Avenue and Thomas Street. Price, $10.

    The following Scandinavians bought or sold real estate in Chicago recently: N. C. Biederman to J. A. Lundstrom: Summerdale, lots 5 and 6, block 40. Price, $2,000. A. E. Johnson ...

    Norwegian
    II F
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 04, 1912
    Meeting of the Bohemian National Cemetery Association

    A meeting was held yesterday of the Bohemian National Cemetery Association under the chairmanship of Mr. [Eugene] Frydl. The minutes of the previous meeting were accepted as read. The payroll for the month of December was $2,075.23. [Translator's note: List of delegates follows.]

    Fifty dollars was appropriated for a donation to the Cesko-Americky Tiskovy Kancelar (Bohemian-American Press Bureau), and Mr. R. Kapsa was elected as the Association's representative to that body. Twenty-five dollars was appropriated for a donation to the Cesky Delnicky Pevecky Sbor (Bohemian Workingmen's Singing Society).

    Indiana bonds held by the Association rose fifteen per cent because the company is now offering the National Cemetery Association forty per cent for bonds held by it, as against a previous offer of twenty-five per cent. These so-called Indiana Bonds are the bonds of a gas company in Indiana, 2and it seems that this company is not faring so badly if in a year's time it can raise its bid by fifteen per cent. Mr. Kralovec moved that the offer be accepted, and Mr. Cerny seconded the motion because the National Bank accepted thirty per cent for the same bonds. The Association holds a total of five thousand dollars of these bonds. After a lengthy debate it was resolved, on a motion by Mr. Smejkal, that the managing committee take the necessary steps to transfer the bonds and accept payment of the two thousand dollars offered.

    Marie Srajba, 1828 South May Street, deposited the sum of two hundred dollars for the decoration of five graves. Mrs. Marie Hejmalik deposited two hundred dollars for the decoration of four graves. Mrs. Karolina Jambora deposited one hundred dollars for the decoration of graves. John and Marie Novak transferred their lot to James Novak.

    Disbursements for the month of December amounted to $5,468.55; receipts, $4,776.75; balance in the treasury, $6,016.85; thirteen lots sold for $1,100.91; burials, 93. The meeting was adjourned.

    A meeting was held yesterday of the Bohemian National Cemetery Association under the chairmanship of Mr. [Eugene] Frydl. The minutes of the previous meeting were accepted as read. The payroll ...

    Bohemian
    III C, II B 1 a, II B 2 d 1
  • Lietuva -- January 05, 1912
    Aurora Forum

    "From the History of Inventions" is the title of a lecture to be given by A. Lalis at the Aurora Hall, 3149 So. Halsted Street, Sunday, January 7,1912.

    "From the History of Inventions" is the title of a lecture to be given by A. Lalis at the Aurora Hall, 3149 So. Halsted Street, Sunday, January 7,1912.

    Lithuanian
    II B 2 g
  • Lietuva -- January 05, 1912
    Lithuanian Journal (Adv.)

    A new monthly people's newspaper, with photographs and various articles from different branches of learning, will begin publication with the New Year. It will be issued once a month. Publishers, P. M. Kaitis & Co. Price only 50 cents a year. It will be the lowest priced and handiest people's newspaper which, instead of concerning itself with meaningless subjects, will give its readers as much spiritual uplift as it can. Hurry to subscribe. Send the money to Lietuviu Zurnalas, 1607 N. Ashland Avenue, Chicago.

    A new monthly people's newspaper, with photographs and various articles from different branches of learning, will begin publication with the New Year. It will be issued once a month. Publishers, ...

    Lithuanian
    II B 2 d 2
  • Lietuva -- January 05, 1912
    Echoes of Life by K. J. Valys

    Dr. A. L. Graiciunas is giving the clericals no respite with his agitation against parochial schools. In Vienybe Lietuviu, he exposed the weaknesses and wrongs of the present parish schools, basing his accusations on reports and statistics from Chicago Lithuanian parochial schools. And he wrote so much that Draugas cannot offer explanations fast enough.

    Unable to defend the parochial schools, Draugas admits they are unfit but expresses the faith that these schools will improve after the founding of the St. Casimir's Convent.

    In Vienybe Lietuviu, Dr. Graiciunas suggests that a petition be sent to the Chicago Archbishop, demanding that the parochial schools be improved.

    2

    I have no confidence for the success of such a petition. It is true that our parish schools are unfit, that they are conducted by semi-educated organists, sacristans, and sisters who do not have the slightest understanding of pedagogic problems, but petitions will not improve them. For the purpose of the church here is not to promote virtues but to collect dollars. A licentious priest who pays large assessments to his bishop will always have the protection of his spiritual authorities.

    It would be best not to send children to the parochial schools, but to send them instead to such public schools as will provide the teaching of the Lithuanian language. We should demand that the government should see to it that all children's schools, no matter of what kind, be taught by accredited teachers, that the pedagogic program be universalized as much as possible, and that all schools be under the supervision of the school board now in charge of the government schools.

    3

    Then, whether they wish it or not, the parochial schools would have to improve.

    I see no other way out.

    Dr. A. L. Graiciunas is giving the clericals no respite with his agitation against parochial schools. In Vienybe Lietuviu, he exposed the weaknesses and wrongs of the present parish schools, ...

    Lithuanian
    I A 2 a, IV, III C, I A 1 a
  • Skandinaven -- January 05, 1912
    Real-Estate Transactions

    Eva A. Petersen to John A. Petersen: Melrose Street and Lincoln Avenue. Price, $1.

    Agnes M. Johnson to Julia Waller: Norwood and Southport Avenues. Price, $1.

    Ida J. Jacobsen to G. A. Foerster: Wrightwood and Racine Avenues. Price, $8,500.

    Anna E. Johnson to G. F. Horn: North 48th and Elston Avenues. Price, $900.

    Olaf F. E. Jensen to Nels. E. Gemmill: Lawndale and Cornelia Avenues. Price, $8,000.

    2

    John A. Benson to H. N. Thoresen: St. Lawrence Avenue and 72nd Street. Price, $6,500.

    Paul E. Petersen to Herbert L. Patterson: Stephenson Avenue and 111th Street. Price, $1,850.

    Wm. R. Carlson to Carrie H. Wagner: Humboldt and Edgewood Avenues. Price, $10.

    John S. Hansen to Tom B. Fogelstad: Sacramento and Diversey Avenues. Price, $27,000.

    Eva A. Petersen to John A. Petersen: Melrose Street and Lincoln Avenue. Price, $1. Agnes M. Johnson to Julia Waller: Norwood and Southport Avenues. Price, $1. Ida J. Jacobsen to ...

    Norwegian
    II F
  • Revyen -- January 06, 1912
    Christmas Celebration

    The Christmas party and dance given last Monday by Lodge Number 35 [of the Danish Brotherhood] were a decided success. Some four hundred children and as many adults enjoyed themselves heartily. Albert Nielsen as the old Santa Claus and Marius Sorensen's two youngsters as the dwarfs were excellent; in the audience one could hear children ask their parents about the dwarfs, and it was really touching to hear the elders tell elf and dwarf stories, thus reviving old memories and reliving their own childhood.

    Of course the children received nice presents, and in accordance with the old Danish custom of first seeing and admiring the Christmas tree and then eating it the tree was stripped of the Danish delicacies with which it was adorned, and candy, fruit and nuts were soon disposed of. The committee certainly deserves credit for the excellent arrangements.

    The Christmas party and dance given last Monday by Lodge Number 35 [of the Danish Brotherhood] were a decided success. Some four hundred children and as many adults enjoyed themselves ...

    Danish
    III B 3 b, I B 4, II D 1
  • Revyen -- January 06, 1912
    Chicago

    p.2. In its new year issue Inter Ocean presents a number of articles, supplemented by pictures, about men prominent in the public life of Chicago, among whom we also find our countryman, Senator Niels Juul. In spite of the fact that we are his political opponents, we have the highest regard for Mr. Juul, due to his outstanding ability, absolute honesty and genuine Danish spirit and sentiment. To quote the Inter Ocean:

    Being author of the famous Juul bill, which so deeply concerns Chicago property owners, would alone be enough to distinguish one legislator from hundreds of others, but Niels Juul State Senator from the 23rd district, and assistant attorney for the Sanitary Board, has added other accomplishments to sustain his claim to distinction. Probably no man has made himself a more prominent figure in Illinois legislation in the last decade than this Chicago attorney. Along with the anti-children's crime law and the woman's guardianship law the Juul measure has done much to place Illinois on a favorable basis as compared 2with other progressive states.

    Mr. Juul came to Chicago thirty-one years ago, while not in his teens, from Denmark,where he was born. He at once took up the study of law, and was admitted to the bar in 1898. The caliber of his legal mind was soon shown, and he was made assistant attorney for the Sanitary Board, which position he still holds. In 1899 he went in for politics, and was elected to the State Senate on the Republican ticket. He was reelected in 1902, 1904 and again in 1910.

    p.2. In its new year issue Inter Ocean presents a number of articles, supplemented by pictures, about men prominent in the public life of Chicago, among whom we also find ...

    Danish
    I F 5, II A 1