The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 08, 1906
    Festive Meeting of Bohemian Workingmen's Singing Societies.

    p. 1, col. 3.. Yesterday belonged to our popular and, well known to our Bohemian public, Bohemian Workingmen's Singing Society, which held a festive meeting, in its quarters for its deserving active members and particularly for the ladies division "Hlahol" and "Maj," in celebration of the fifteenth anniversary of its organization.

    This festive meeting was brought to order by the chairman, Mr. Jos. Rands, who welcomed all of the participants with a few sincere words, at the same time pointing our the significance of the occasion, following which the men's chorus sang "Cesky Lev." Miss Julia Vokoun recited with great success B. Bittner's poem about the fifteen years' existence of the Bohemian Workingmen's Singing Society.

    The old ranger and co-founder, Mr. Joseph Hrusa, gave a minute sketch of the history, activities and financial standing of the society, after which the members of the women's branches "Hlahol" and "Maj" rendered the delightful song "Na Nebi Mesic s Hvezdami" (The Moon and Stars in Heaven); this number 2was generously applauded.

    Prof. J. J. Kral's festive speech was really the pearl of the celebration. He took for his theme "The spirit of national songs" and in his humor laden speech, quoted texts and melodies of individual Bohemian songs, first he referred to what our national Bohemian songs mean to us Bohemians, those songs, which were the only solace of the Bohemian people when they found themselves in subjugation; in them is pictured the life of the whole Bohemian nation and this national gem of ours, this priceless possession was fostered in this foreign land by our Bohemian Workingmen's Singing Society for the past fifteen years.

    This society is deserving of recognition for the work it has done. This society was the first to found a singing school for children. This school under the direction of the successful choir-master, Mr. Kalas, continues to grow to this day. It is hardly necessary to enter into detail about the activities of the society, for the Bohemian public is sufficiently informed that the Bohemian Workingmen's Singing Society, from the date of its organization has always stood at the forefront of the national life of Chicago Bohemians, appeared and took part willingly on every occassion free of charge, even if at times it received for its generosity and effort only ingratitude. In spite of many hardships and deficiencies, which the society had to overcome in the beginning, its ranks are 3growing constantly, and there remains nothing for us except to wish the Bohemian Workingmen's Singing Society well in their further meritorious activities.

    p. 1, col. 3.. Yesterday belonged to our popular and, well known to our Bohemian public, Bohemian Workingmen's Singing Society, which held a festive meeting, in its quarters for its ...

    Bohemian
    II B 1 a, IV, III B 2
  • Svenska Tribunen -- January 09, 1906
    Bank at Union Bank

    Every Swede should do his banking business at the Union Bank of Chicago, the Scandinavian Bank, located at La Sall and Randolph Streets. All the employees, and nearly all stockholders of this State bank are Swedes. It is open every Monday until 8 P.M.

    Every Swede should do his banking business at the Union Bank of Chicago, the Scandinavian Bank, located at La Sall and Randolph Streets. All the employees, and nearly all stockholders ...

    Swedish
    II A 2, III A
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 09, 1906
    Smulski for Mayor

    The city counselor, Mr. John F. Smulski, has the support of nearly all the Republicans in Chicago. Last night a Republican banquet was held in the Schoenhofen Hall.

    Among those present were: James Reddick, Judge Serenson, Peter Olson, J. Himas, J. Devine, Brundage, Williams, Senator Haas, state counselor Healy, Abel Davis, Judge McEwen, Oscar Hebel, Hohn Lynn, Phillip Garner, Senator Campbell, George Anderson, James Pease, Alderman, Raymer, Larson and Sitts.

    When the question was asked as to the next mayor in Chicago, there were yells of "John F. Smulski, John F. Smulski."

    The uproar became an ovation.

    Short speeches were made by James Reddick and Judge McEwen indorsing Smulski, and Williams proposed a toast.

    Mr. Smulski spoke briefly, omitting mention of politics.

    The city counselor, Mr. John F. Smulski, has the support of nearly all the Republicans in Chicago. Last night a Republican banquet was held in the Schoenhofen Hall. Among those ...

    Polish
    IV, I F 5
  • Lietuva -- January 09, 1906
    Brother Workers

    Our brothers in the fatherland are giving their lives for freedom. Let us donate at least one hour of our time to remember them.

    The 4th branch of the Lithuanian Socialist Party of Chicago has arranged a lecture in memory of Bloody Sunday (January 22, 1905) in St. Petersburg, Russia, when the blood of the people was shed for the cause of liberty.

    Those who stand for the welfare and freedom of suffering humanity should come to this meeting, which will be held on Sunday, January 21, 1906, at the Dores Hall, 2501 S. Halsted St., at 1 P. M.

    Your are invited in the name of humanity and freedom.

    Committee.

    Our brothers in the fatherland are giving their lives for freedom. Let us donate at least one hour of our time to remember them. The 4th branch of the Lithuanian ...

    Lithuanian
    III H, I E
  • Svenska Tribunen -- January 09, 1906
    $189,000 Interest Paid by Savings Bank

    On January 1, the State Bank of Chicago paid out $98,017 interest for the last six months of 1905. On July 1, 1905, interest amounted to $90,902. The entire amount of interest paid by the savings department to their twenty-two thousand depositors reached the respectable sum of $189,000 during the past year. The larger part of this interest was received by Chicago Scandinavians.

    On January 1, the State Bank of Chicago paid out $98,017 interest for the last six months of 1905. On July 1, 1905, interest amounted to $90,902. The entire amount ...

    Swedish
    II A 2
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 11, 1906
    The Old People's Home

    Bids have been submitted for the construction of the Old People's Home. We have been waiting for this for twelve years, and we welcome this step with great satisfaction. But at the same time we express the hope that we shall not have to wait another twelve years for the actual construction or furnishing of the Home. Nevertheless we must not reproach the Association in any way, for its representatives have always done their duty. Rather it is our fault, the fault of all of us, because we were not generous enough, were not energetic enough in seeing to the establishment of an Old People's Home and an Orphanage. This noble, truly necessary undertaking should have been the goal of all Bohemians; we should all have done our duty, and then it would have been completed long ago. Thus far we have not done so. We depended upon one another, and the majority of us left all the work for the minority. The Old People's Home was not sufficient for us; we immediately started a dozen other projects and tried to work on all of them at once.

    Yes, we started; but when shall we finish? We speak beautifully and 2enthusiastically, but at the same time we divide our strength and then complain that we are weak, that we shall not accomplish anything. We had one objective, and we should have dedicated ourselves industriously to it. Then, after we had brought it to a successful conclusion, we could have worked with eager energy on another. Why don't we do it that way?

    Bids have been submitted for the construction of the Old People's Home. We have been waiting for this for twelve years, and we welcome this step with great satisfaction. But ...

    Bohemian
    II D 5, II D 4
  • Lietuva -- January 12, 1906
    Donation for the Revolutionary Cause

    The Lithuanian Independent Club held its meeting at the Azukas Hall. After business was disposed of, the president, Mr. Zemaitis, requested those present to donate for the revolutionary movement in Russia. The club donated $5. At the meeting was collected $4.62. Total $9.62. The money was sent to the office of Lietuva.

    The Lithuanian Independent Club held its meeting at the Azukas Hall. After business was disposed of, the president, Mr. Zemaitis, requested those present to donate for the revolutionary movement in ...

    Lithuanian
    III H
  • Lietuva -- January 12, 1906
    The Third Protocol the Chicago Central Revolutionary Aid Committee

    On December 17, 1905, in the Providence of God parish hall, at 7:30 P. M., was held a Chicago Lithuanian public meeting for aid to the orphans and the revolutionists who are fighting for freedom in Lithuania. The meeting was called to order by Mr. J. Varkala. Lie explained the necessity and duty of the American Lithuanians to help our brothers in Lithuania. Then he asked the Dr. Kudirka chorus to come on the stage. The chorus sang the "Marseillaise." The first speaker was Mr. Eismontas; the second, Mr. Gugis; and young Zimontas read the poem "Marseillaise." Then spoke Mr. J. Bagdziunas. After the speech a girl eight years old, A. Kabasinskiute, delivered the poem "Liberty." The last to speak were J. Petrocius and St. Marcinkevicia.

    All the speakers said that the struggle for liberty is holy to the people of Lithuania and to everyone born from a Lithuanian mother. Liberty has always won, not by the mercy of rulers but by the blood of the oppressed.

    2

    Bureaucratic rule is under the control of a few idiots who are drinking and fattening themselves by the labor of the oppressed and exploited. The speakers urged the people to come with their aid without any hesitation, in order to help our brothers in Russia and in Lithuania to overthrow the tyranny.

    After the speeches those present elected a committee on the West Side to collect money for the revolutionary cause in Lithuania. The following persons were elected: K. Simkus, 624 S. Union Avenue; K. Rudis, 53 W. 17th St.; J. Gievilla, 163 W. 18th St.; A. Keidis, 59 W. 14th St.; V. Livickis, 136 Canalport Avenue; T. Drugtenis, 90 W. 19th St.; V. Maseika, 668 S. Union Avenue; J. Sidaravicia, 681 S. Union Avenue; V. Valentinovicz, 91 Canalport Avenue; A. Venckis, 745 S. Jefferson St.

    When the above named committee was elected, Jancevskis and Petraitis spoke about the bad condition of the workers in Russia. At this meeting we collected $20.14.

    3

    Mr. Bagdziunas donated forty-five cents for pictures sold. Total $20.59. Up to the 7th day of January, 1906, the treasurer, St. Marcinkevicius, had on hand $197.26 in the revolutionary fund.

    Dr. A. L. Graiciunas

    Secretary of the Central Revolutionary

    Committee of Chicago.

    On December 17, 1905, in the Providence of God parish hall, at 7:30 P. M., was held a Chicago Lithuanian public meeting for aid to the orphans and the revolutionists ...

    Lithuanian
    III H, IV, III B 2, II D 10
  • Onze Toekomst -- January 12, 1906
    The Closing of the Saloons on Sunday (Editorial)

    Much has been said and written lately, as to whether or not the saloons should be closed on Sunday. Let us say, here and now, that we would strongly favor the closing of the saloons on Sunday. The possibility of this is another question. Then Mayor Dunne was a candidate for Mayor, he was requested by a committee from the "Women's Christian Temperance Union" and representatives of other temperance societies to answer the question: That if he were elected Mayor of Chicago, whether or not he would force the saloonkeepers to keep their doors closed to the public on Sunday? The Nayoral Candidate answered that he was not ready to answer this question, but that he could assure them, the committees, that he would enforce the law as it was actually written.

    Dunne was elected, but the saloons stayed open to the great disappointment of the "Women's Christian Temperance Union". Some assert that 2the Mayor does not keep his word and does not enforce the law, and they even call this a wanton violation of the oath which he took when he was installed as Mayor of Chicago. There is, so they declare, a law which prohibits the keeping open of saloons on Sunday and this law is not enforced.

    This declaration is not without good grounds. Indeed there is such a law. Although old, it is not obsolete, but is so covered by political dust and filth that it is hard to find and can,positively not be seen by the naked eye. But the Mayor, and in his name also the Chief of Police, declare that they have nothing to do with the enforcement of this law. It is, so they declare, not a City ordinance, but a State law, which compels the closing on Sunday, and if the State law must be enforced, then they must go to the Governor with their request. The Governor is the man who must take care of that, says Mayor Dunne. The Governor is also deaf to the request. He declares that he was not chosen to act as a bailiff or a policeman. And so things continue. The saloons stay open. No one feels himself responsible enough to enforce the law, be it the Mayor, 3the Chief of Police, or even the Governor of the State of Illinois.

    Just one question in conclusion: Why do we have so many laws which are being construed as unenforceable? The Sunday Closing law as well as many others, was never enforced and will evidently remain a dead letter.

    Much has been said and written lately, as to whether or not the saloons should be closed on Sunday. Let us say, here and now, that we would strongly favor ...

    Dutch
    I B 2
  • Greek Star -- January 12, 1906
    Brilliant Success of the Greek-American Meeting

    Only a Greek poet would have been able to describe graphically the panorama of the first Greek-American meeting, which took place last week at Hull House, and which marks the beginning of closer co-operation between Greeks and Americans.

    Not being a contemporary Homer, the Star will not attempt to apotheosize the spirit of the meeting, leaving the "impossible to describe," the eulogy, and the deification to Chicago sister dailies, which were all represented at the meeting, and which with unanimous voice and in colorful language informed the public of this first meeting of the two races, of its astounding success, and of the sincere enthusiasm of Greeks and Americans alike.

    The Parthenon of Hull House, bedecked with two huge flags, American and Greek, and surrounded by the labarums of all the Greek societies in Chicago, was transformed into matchless beauty by expensive flowers, plants, and hanging baskets, which had been donated by the Greek florists of Chicago. The ceiling, 2the walls, and every available inch of space in the hall were embellished by a profusion of flowers and plants of various kinds. Myriads of Fantastic polychromatic lights reflected the scintillating panorama, which tantalized mind and senses. Rhythm, beauty, and harmony prevailed everywhere.

    Eight o'clock was the time set for the opening of the program, but the hall at six o'clock was already packed, and the doors were closed. When the Mayor and his wife came at 9:00 P.M., it was necessary to telephone inside the hall to open the gates for the distinguished visitors.

    In spite of the jam and the disappointment of people unable to enter, perfect order prevailed inside and outside the building.

    At 8:10 P.M. everybody stood up as if by magic, for the orchestra began to play the American National anthem, which was followed by the Greek National hymn. Hand-clapping and loud cheers filled the hall for three minutes.

    3

    Dead silence ensued when Miss Jane Addams rose. In well-chosen words she opened the session and delivered the introductory address, explaining the object of the meeting, and then presented the Reverend L. Pegeas, chairman of the organization committee.

    The Greek archimandrite, tall, handsome (they all are), exceptionally dignified and gifted with a mellifluous voice, delivered a significant address urging the Greeks to accept and adopt American idealism, which according to his conception is the highest in the world. Thunderous applause filled the hall again. A sister daily said next day: "The thunder of the heavens has less effect on the human ear than the thunder produced by the hand-clapping at the Greek-American meeting." A melody from "Aida" followed to soothe the ear-drums.

    Miss Addams next introduced Judge Edward Brown, who for half an hour, with the polished rhetoric characteristic of the jurist, connected the brilliancy of ancient Greece with the enormous progress of the Greeks of Chicago, who, in a short period of time and in spite of many disadvantages, have risen and progressed with Chicago. This time "The Waves of Danube", played by the 4orchestra, relieved the deafening applause for Judge Brown.

    But fate decreed that the many blue-blooded American ladies present, who in spite of the thunderous applause were very much pleased with the enthusiastic Greeks, should not long enjoy this respite, for the soothing melody of the orchestra was overwhelmed by a fresh outbreak of cheers when the news spread that the Mayor of Chicago was standing outside waiting to be admitted. As the Mayor and his wife took their seats on the platform, Mr. E. Karavelis, floor manager, in a resonant voice announced: "In honor of the Mayor of Chicago, who has honored this meeting with his presence, I request everybody to rise and cheer for the Honorable Edward Dunne." The audience responded to the request, and the enthusiastic applause, as reporters described it, "appeared to be the end of the world."

    Dr. Paul Shorey, Professor of Greek Literature at the University of Chicago, was the next speaker, and for an hour and ten minutes he kept the audience agog with his quiet reasoning, enumerating the achievements of the Greeks in Chicago and their effect upon the city and the country. The erudite Professor, 5who was interrupted by applause no less than thirty-two times, in calculated yet fascinating phrases told the assemblage the story of Greek progress, beginning with the immigrant Greek of yesterday.

    Although the Mayor was not on the program as a speaker, he nevertheless made a polished and humorous ten-minute address, eulogizing the Greek element of the city's population. He terminated his speech with these words: "Whenever I hear the Greek language spoken on the streets of Chicago, though it is all Greek to me, it arouses in me a feeling of friendliness and admiration for the Greek race." Selections from "Rigoletto" were then played by the orchestra, and Miss Addams introduced Mr. N. Karalopoulos, who delivered in English a profound address, which the Inter-Ocean published in full.

    Other speakers were Andrew J. Vlachos, Dr. Gregory Papaeliou, and Dr. N. Salopoulos, Greek consul general in Chicago.

    Comments on the Greek-American meeting were published by the Tribune, the Chronicle, the Inter-Ocean, the Record-Herald, the Daily News, the Examiner, 6These newspapers carried long articles about the Greek-American meeting and its success and about the Greeks of Chicago in general.

    The brilliant success of the meeting is attributed to the organized efforts of the committee, which left nothing unprepared. The meeting was attended by many society women, by representatives of the bench, by captains of industry, by bankers, by persons of wealth, by educators, and by the entire press. The Greeks, although they had no such dignitaries as the Americans in attendance, nevertheless presented the best that they had: doctors, lawyers, prominent persons of the Greek community, businessmen, publishers of Greek newspapers, representatives of the church, many well-to-do Greeks, and the Chicago Greek consul general.

    A bevy of American and Greek beauties, followed by a score of boys laden with 7baskets of flowers, left no lapel without a rose or a carnation, and no American or Greek lady went home without an armful of choice flowers. The reception committee left nothing to chance in its efforts to accommodate and please the invited guests. Blue-blooded American ladies beamed with joy at the courteous treatment and the hospitality extended to them by the obliging Greeks. All in all, everybody was pleased and looked forward to a repetition of the event.

    Credit and honor are due to Miss Jane Addams for being the initiator of the affair, which has had a far-reaching effect. The Star is grateful to her.

    Only a Greek poet would have been able to describe graphically the panorama of the first Greek-American meeting, which took place last week at Hull House, and which marks the ...

    Greek
    I C, IV, III C, II B 2 g