The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 03, 1906
    Open Meeting of the C. S. P. S. (Czecho-Slovak Benevolent Societies) Crowned with Great Success.

    p.1--The Chicago lodges of the powerful C. S. P. S. organization held a public meeting on Sunday afternoon which in every respect revealed the dignity of this powerful national body.

    The meeting was opened at 2 o'clock in the Bohemian-American School's hall on Eighteenth street with a welcoming address by Mr. Kristian Walleck, after which a richly varied program was presented, consisting of speeches, band music, and singing.

    The principal speaker was Mr. A. Cejka, chairman of the national office of the C. S. P. S.

    Dr. F. Iska, Mr. Novak, and others also spoke. Mr. R. Rubringer's orchestra, Miss Bessie Egermayer, the Bohemian Working-men's Singing Society, and Mr. Sulz furnished the musical portion of the program with great success.

    2

    Mr. F. K. Novak received a well deserved reward at this meeting for securing the largest number of new members in this last year. The meeting was a grand affair and a real manifestation of the C. S. P. S.

    p.1--The Chicago lodges of the powerful C. S. P. S. organization held a public meeting on Sunday afternoon which in every respect revealed the dignity of this powerful national body. ...

    Bohemian
    II D 1, II B 1 a, III B 4
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 04, 1906
    Bohemian National Cemetery.

    p. 1--The regular monthly meeting of the Bohemian National Cemetery Association was held yesterday evening in the Bohemian-American School's hall on Eighteenth street.

    The meeting was called to order by the chairman, Mr. John Pech, about 8 p. m., and after the secretary, Mr. St. Halik had read the faultlessly written minutes of the previous meeting, the treasurer, Mr. Husak, read out the bills payable, which were then placed before the meeting for consideration.

    Since the bills were for work done on the cemetery or for materials delivered there, they were accepted as read and ordered paid. There were really many bills this time, and the treasurer, Mr. Joseph Jurka, looked somewhat sour when he was paying them.

    The secretary then read the communications received.

    2

    All these letters reported names of new delegates elected by several lodges and associations which send representatives to the Association.

    The committee on distribution of New Year's gifts to the Bohemian liberal schools announced that the Association had made the following donations; to the Saturday and Sunday School Association, $85; to the C. S. P. S. (Czechoslovak Benevolent Society) School on Eighteenth street, $105; to the Ladimir Klacel School at Nineteenth and Leavitt streets, $85; to the Vojta Naprstek School on Kedzie avenue, $105; to the Komensky School, $55; to the Palacky School, $85; to the Jonas School, $55; to the Grand Crossing School, $55; to the Children's Nursery, $80; to the Bunker Street School Association, $105; to the Irving Park School, $50; and to the Bohemian Working-Men's Singing Society School, $50.

    Thereafter various motions were made for the good of the Cemetery. And here it seems to us that the delegates committed a sad mistake, which they will regret some day. We refer to the resolution in regard to Section P, which lies around the Soldiers' Monument.

    3

    It was resolved to adorn this section as a beauty-spot of the National Cemetery and also as a gathering place for all celebrations held in the Cemetery, especially for the Decoration Day ceremonies. For that reason no more burial-lots will be sold in this section. This is entirely in order, and we believe that it will be beneficial to the Cemetery. However, we condemn the consequent resolution, to disinter and rebury the bodies which were there interred some time ago. This resolution was adopted in spite of many warnings and objections.

    The National Cemetery is not a private undertaking; it is, so to speak, the property of the liberal-minded Bohemians of Chicago, and everyone has its success at heart. The majority of those interested would probably say what Mr. Kostner said yesterday. "Why rebury these bodies in another place? The section will be made over into the most beautiful spot in the Cemetery, and surely the remains will rest there just as well as anywhere else."

    4

    We are firmly convinced that the resolution should be reconsidered, and that another vote taken in the matter.

    Nothing else of importance was discussed. From the bookkeeper's report we learn that in the month of December disbursements were $7,208.05, and receipts were $5,240.34. The money on hand at the end of November was $4919.08, and this leaves the present balance $2,951.37.

    In December nine lots were sold for $1,015; seventy-five bodies were buried, and $979.89 was placed in the reserve fund.

    p. 1--The regular monthly meeting of the Bohemian National Cemetery Association was held yesterday evening in the Bohemian-American School's hall on Eighteenth street. The meeting was called to order by ...

    Bohemian
    III C, IV, I A 1 d, II B 2 f
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 04, 1906
    Bohemian Life in America.

    p. 4--Lately our Bohemian-American life has been subjected to severe criticism, several newspapers taking part in the debates. A thing of this kind does no harm. However, we did not hear one entirely sound opinion voiced during these debates.

    On the one side it was all idealism, on the other plain materialism. Much can be written about the life of American-Bohemians, very much; but the question of their life will never be solved. In spite of the fact that idealists tell us, that we should remain Czech patriots, our fate is sealed--we shall disappear in the sea of another nation.

    Whatever the ideals may be of those people who reproach us, we did not come to America with the thought of founding a new Bohemian, but to assure ourselves a decent living.

    It will be our pride, if we can continue to regard ourselves as Czechs for as long a period as possible.

    2

    We do not fear, however, that any changes, either political or of our language, will be forced upon us. This is impossible.

    The idealists forget this fact, and this causes them to misunderstand our attitude and to subject us to unduly severe criticism.

    p. 4--Lately our Bohemian-American life has been subjected to severe criticism, several newspapers taking part in the debates. A thing of this kind does no harm. However, we did not ...

    Bohemian
    III A
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 05, 1906
    Protest Meeting.

    p. 2, col. 3 - The meeting which had for its purpose taking steps whereby better police protection would be provided in Bohemian California, and which was called for last night in Placek's hall, was attended by only about twenty citizens. Aldermen Uhlir and Zimmer of the 12th ward, and Mr. Cermak, a member of the state legislature, arrived on time and patiently waited, thinking that perhaps more citizens would arrive. However, when waiting proved to be of no avail, the meeting was started.

    Mr. J. Marek was elected chairman, and Mr. J. Cerny as secretary. The first to speak was Alderman Uhlir, who regretted the small attendance of citizens, because he had also invited the commanding officer of the Lawndale police station to be present at the meeting to hear complaints which the citizens have against the police.

    The police commander did not come and this angered Mr. Uhlir in the beginning, but when he saw how poorly the meeting was attended, he was glad. The Aldermen explained that the fault lies in the manner in which police are assigned to the Lawndale station. This station is considered some sort of penal colony, to which police are sent for punishment, when they have brought the anger of 2their superiors upon themselves for some reason or other.

    In order to remedy existing conditions the citizens must help the Aldermen. They must hold big protest meetings, they must see to it that reports of these meetings get into the daily papers and to the chief of police and the mayor. He who wants conditions changed must work himself, and agitate among those who are indifferent.

    The next meeting of citizens for this purpose will be held next Tuesday evening in Placek's hall. It is expected that it will be more numerously attended. It will be seen to that the proceedings and resolutions of the citizens will be published in the English daily newspapers and reported to the Chief of Police and to the mayor. An agitation committee was elected composed of the following: Messrs. Jiran, Prasil, Cerny, Marek and Cermak. Those present were urged by Mr. Cermak to agitate and bring as many of their friends as possible to next Tuesday's meeting.

    p. 2, col. 3 - The meeting which had for its purpose taking steps whereby better police protection would be provided in Bohemian California, and which was called for last ...

    Bohemian
    I F 2, I F 5, I F 4, I F 3, II E 3
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 06, 1906
    Bohemian Artist Honored

    Mr. August Petrtyl was elected president of the artists' and sculptors' society, known as the Palette and Chisel Club, at the annual meeting held night before last in the Athenaea Building. Today's Chronicle contains a portrait of Mr. Petrtyl, and acclaims him as a well-known local painter and illustrator. Our readers also know and appreciate Mr. Petrtyl's work. Mr. Petrtyl was the illustrator of the "Calender Hlasatel" for 1906, and the illustration on our wall calendar was also made by him.

    Mr. August Petrtyl was elected president of the artists' and sculptors' society, known as the Palette and Chisel Club, at the annual meeting held night before last in the Athenaea ...

    Bohemian
    II A 3 c, IV
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 06, 1906
    Union of Czechoslovak Sokols of America.

    p. 1, col. 5.. Last week, in the hall of Pilsen Sokol, a meeting was held of delegates from the National Sokol Union, the American Workingmen's Sokol Union and of the "Fuegner-Tyrs" Sokol circuit. The question again was the important matter of how to combine the various Sokol units in America into one powerful organization.

    After a lengthy debate it was resolved to submit to the above named organizations the original motions by Sokol Jar. Kosar and Jos. Cermak and according to the decisions of these organizations, to hold further discussions of the matter. The motions made, deal mostly with conditions and circumstances under which the organization is to be kept active after it is created.

    If one of these motions is approved, then a convention of delegates from the various Sokol units will be called as soon as possible, who will make the final decision about the creation of the Union, elect the necessary officers and begin their duties at once.

    This union will be a benefit to the Sokols especially from a technical point, 2because its purpose will be: to maintain an educational course for instructors, to arrange instructive lectures on physical culture and hygiene, and the arrangement of joint public exhibitions. We hope that American Sokols will recognize the real necessity for such an organization and will not allow such a good idea to fail.

    p. 1, col. 5.. Last week, in the hall of Pilsen Sokol, a meeting was held of delegates from the National Sokol Union, the American Workingmen's Sokol Union and of ...

    Bohemian
    II B 3, II B 2 f, III B 2, III A, IV
  • Skandinaven -- January 07, 1906
    [Gade Named Consul]

    Frederik H. Gade until further notice will represent the new Norwegian country. He is the first Norwegian Consul in Chicago under King Haakon. He was born in Norway in 1871. His father Gerhardt Gade was for many years the American Consul to Christana.

    Frederik Gade is a graduate of Harvard University. In 1895 he graduated from Harvard Law School. He came straight to Chicago and opened a law office. For the past ten years he has been Norwegian and Swedish Consul in Chicago.

    Frederik H. Gade until further notice will represent the new Norwegian country. He is the first Norwegian Consul in Chicago under King Haakon. He was born in Norway in 1871. ...

    Norwegian
    IV, III H
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 07, 1906
    Czech Painter Elected President Palette and Chisel Club.

    p. 1, col. 6.. Yesterday we mentioned the election of our countryman, Mr. Petrtyl, as president of the society of artists and sculptors. To that we add a supplement. The election was unanimous and took place in the annual meeting of the Palette and Chisel Club.

    When he was installed, Mr. Petrtyl made a short speech, in which he self consciously expressed, that he was proud because a Bohemian was elected to the highest office of the art society in which Bohemians are only a small minority. Mr. Petrtyl formerly was recorder for the organization.

    Only three Bohemians are active members of the society, Petrtyl, Lukas and Krasa. At the last exhibition held by the club, Mr. Petrtyl's paintings were praised and reproduced by several English journals.

    p. 1, col. 6.. Yesterday we mentioned the election of our countryman, Mr. Petrtyl, as president of the society of artists and sculptors. To that we add a supplement. The ...

    Bohemian
    II A 3 c, IV
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 07, 1906
    Triner Host to Bohemian Quartette

    While on its world tour the Bohemian Quartette, making its last American appearance at Thalia Hall, is enjoying the hospitality of Mr. [Josef] Triner, the well-known manufacturer of bitter wine. Mr. Triner is a true friend of Bohemian art and artists. Recently he bought and paid a neat sum for several paintings by Farske. In this respect, there is hardly another wealthy Bohemian who can compare with Mr. Triner.

    While on its world tour the Bohemian Quartette, making its last American appearance at Thalia Hall, is enjoying the hospitality of Mr. [Josef] Triner, the well-known manufacturer of bitter wine. ...

    Bohemian
    II A 2, II A 3 c, II A 3 b, IV
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 08, 1906
    Festive Meeting of Bohemian Workingmen's Singing Societies.

    p. 1, col. 3.. Yesterday belonged to our popular and, well known to our Bohemian public, Bohemian Workingmen's Singing Society, which held a festive meeting, in its quarters for its deserving active members and particularly for the ladies division "Hlahol" and "Maj," in celebration of the fifteenth anniversary of its organization.

    This festive meeting was brought to order by the chairman, Mr. Jos. Rands, who welcomed all of the participants with a few sincere words, at the same time pointing our the significance of the occasion, following which the men's chorus sang "Cesky Lev." Miss Julia Vokoun recited with great success B. Bittner's poem about the fifteen years' existence of the Bohemian Workingmen's Singing Society.

    The old ranger and co-founder, Mr. Joseph Hrusa, gave a minute sketch of the history, activities and financial standing of the society, after which the members of the women's branches "Hlahol" and "Maj" rendered the delightful song "Na Nebi Mesic s Hvezdami" (The Moon and Stars in Heaven); this number 2was generously applauded.

    Prof. J. J. Kral's festive speech was really the pearl of the celebration. He took for his theme "The spirit of national songs" and in his humor laden speech, quoted texts and melodies of individual Bohemian songs, first he referred to what our national Bohemian songs mean to us Bohemians, those songs, which were the only solace of the Bohemian people when they found themselves in subjugation; in them is pictured the life of the whole Bohemian nation and this national gem of ours, this priceless possession was fostered in this foreign land by our Bohemian Workingmen's Singing Society for the past fifteen years.

    This society is deserving of recognition for the work it has done. This society was the first to found a singing school for children. This school under the direction of the successful choir-master, Mr. Kalas, continues to grow to this day. It is hardly necessary to enter into detail about the activities of the society, for the Bohemian public is sufficiently informed that the Bohemian Workingmen's Singing Society, from the date of its organization has always stood at the forefront of the national life of Chicago Bohemians, appeared and took part willingly on every occassion free of charge, even if at times it received for its generosity and effort only ingratitude. In spite of many hardships and deficiencies, which the society had to overcome in the beginning, its ranks are 3growing constantly, and there remains nothing for us except to wish the Bohemian Workingmen's Singing Society well in their further meritorious activities.

    p. 1, col. 3.. Yesterday belonged to our popular and, well known to our Bohemian public, Bohemian Workingmen's Singing Society, which held a festive meeting, in its quarters for its ...

    Bohemian
    II B 1 a, IV, III B 2