The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Chicago Chronicle -- January 01, 1905
    Swedish Editors to Celebrate

    The Chicago Hamlandet is the first Swedish-American newspaper to obtain the age of half a century, having been published continuously since January 3, 1854 and next Tuesday its golden anniversary will be commemorated by the issue of an illustrated jubilee edition in colors and containing a review of the past fifty years of important events in its own and the Swedish-American people's history. Previous to 1854 the number of Swedish immigrants then in this country was limited. The Bishop Hill colony and at Andover, Moline and Galesburg, with a few colonies in Iowa and other western states, probably did not number more than 5,000 people.

    The Augustana Lutheran Synod was organized and the Hemlandet became the official organ of the Synod and continued as such until 1872, since which time it has been owned by private parties. Its editors during this half century of the Swedish-Americans as Rev. Dr. E. Norelius, Dr. Erland Carlson, Jonas Engberg, Dr. E. R. Cervin, P. A. Sundelius and the present editor, the venerable Dr. J. A. Enander.

    2

    From January 3, 1854, until 1859 the Hemlandet was published in Galesburg, Ill., when it moved to Chicago. Its principle owner and president of the Hemlandet company since 1896 is the noted Swedish-American, A. E. Johnson, Knight of the Royal Swedish Order of the Wasa, who can also celebrate his golden anniversary, as it was in 1854 ,he arrived in Chicago from Sweden.

    The principle members of the staff of the Hemlandet today are Dr. J. A. Enander, vice-president and editor in Chief; A. Schon, secretary and assistant-editor; Aaron Edstroom, exchange editor; Carl T. Strandberg, treasurer and general manager; Gunnar Boberg, assistant business and advertising manager.

    The Chicago Hamlandet is the first Swedish-American newspaper to obtain the age of half a century, having been published continuously since January 3, 1854 and next Tuesday its golden anniversary ...

    Swedish
    II B 2 d 1, III C
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 02, 1905
    Decennial Jubilee

    P.1--The popularity which has been gained by St. John of Nepomuk Court No. 457 of the Catholic Foresters during the ten years of its existence was demonstrated in a most significant manner on Saturday at its jubilee celebration held in Liberty Hall, Union Avenue and Thirtieth Street. All the space in the hall was filled by a merry, enthusiastic public, whose gayety steadily increased.

    The committee on arrangements deserves praise and recognition, for it did not forget anything which might add to the success of the affair. All those who attended were in the fullest measure satisfied, and the circle of the friends of St. John's Court was considerably enlarged by this celebration.

    P.1--The popularity which has been gained by St. John of Nepomuk Court No. 457 of the Catholic Foresters during the ten years of its existence was demonstrated in a most ...

    Bohemian
    II B 1 c 3, III C, III B 2
  • Chicago Chronicle -- January 02, 1905
    Urge Jews to Seek Independence

    That the time shortly may come when the American and the Jew, each with a country of which to be proud, shall preach and enjoy the doctrine of personal liberty was the dream outlined last evening by Rev. S. Margolies before the mass meeting of Knights of Zion at the Studebaker Theater. Nearly 1,500 enthusiastic disciples of the Zion movement were present and the predictions outlining a speedy culmination of the desire to regain Palestine were warmly applauded.

    "Zionists are optimists," said Dr. Margolies, the chief speaker, "and for excellent reasons. The time for weeping and crying among the Jews is rapidly passing away. Thirty-five hundred years of persecution and sorrow is sufficient and a new era is opening for the Hebrew.

    "It is fitting that the Jews should have a country and a city of which they may be proud. England has her London, Germany her Berlin, America her New York, Russia her St. Petersburg, and the Jew shall have his Zion.

    "Young Americans are told to be proud of their Americanism because America has institutions, 2privileges, hopes which warrant pride. The young Jew, on the other hand, has nothing now on which to build his nationality.

    "Once with a country of our own, neither Russia nor any other nation will dare to assail our right to life and the enjoyment of liberty."

    Visitors Welcomed to Chicago

    An address of welcome in behalf of Mayor Harrison was delivered to the visiting knights by Dr. Howard S. Taylor, in which the peaceful crusade of the Zionists was compared to the ancient efforts of the crusaders under Richard III.

    Interspersed with the addresses was an excellent musical program, including the singing of the "Hatikvah" or Zionist national hymn, a piano sole by Dr. C. F. Balatka and a selection by Miss Birdie Kaplan.

    The program closed with an appeal to all Jews to ally themselves with the movement by Grand Master Leon Zolotkoff of the Order Knights of Zion.

    3

    Meetings were held throughout yesterday at the headquarters of the West Chicago Club, 50 Throop Street, and an informal banquet was given in the afternoon, at which prominent speakers from other cities expressed their views on the Zionist movement in general.

    At the morning session, which opened the business of the seventh annual convention, the keynote was struck when Grand Master announced that nothing less than a return of the Jews to Palestine would satisfy the leaders of the movement.

    Urges Return to Palestine

    The thought was further developed in the address of Grand Recorder, Max Shulman, in the conclusion of his annual report.

    "Only in a home on the soil from whence we sprang," he said, "will we be able to animate our language and our history. Only on the land where our fathers lived, fought and died can we build our nest.

    4

    "Gather ye children, of Israel, from the four corners of the globe under our royal banner of national independence."

    At the afternoon banquet, which was given under the auspices of the Clara De Hirsch ladies' "gate," or chapter, N. D. Kaplan, chairman of the convention committee, officiated as toastmaster. Speeches were made by B. Horwich of Vienna, who spoke on "The Products of Palestine," and Rabbi B. Margolis of Cleveland, Ohio. Telegrams and letters from Israel Zangwell, Dr. Max Heller of New Orleans, Michael Davit and others unable to attend the convention, but interested in the movement, were read to the assembled delegates.

    At to-day's sessions reports of the committees on resolutions and on nominations will be heard. The election and installation of officers will take place in the evening.

    The Order of the Knights of Zion was organized in October 1898, at Chicago to utilize the fraternal system of instilling life into the movement and to establish a more effective basis for promoting the Zionist principles.

    5

    From a small beginning the organization has grown to a membership of over 2,500 in fifty seven chapters, scattered throughout ten central states.

    That the time shortly may come when the American and the Jew, each with a country of which to be proud, shall preach and enjoy the doctrine of personal liberty ...

    Jewish
    III G, III B 4
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 02, 1905
    New Year's Public Exercises by Pupils of Vojta Naprstek School Met with Great Success

    Few Bohemian schools in America can boast of a greater success than that achieved yesterday by the Vojta Naprstek School. On New Year's day the pupils of this school went through the annual public examination exercises, held in the hall of the Sokol Chicago on Kedzie Avenue. The exercises, consisting chiefly of classic and humorous speeches, poems, declamations, songs, and plays, were held during the afternoon and evening.

    How great is the favor the Vojta Naprstek School is held in, was evidenced by the large number of persons that came to the exercises. The hall was so crowded that there were no seats for many of the visitors.

    The school is attended by almost three hundred pupils. Classes are held all day on Saturdays and during the morning on Sundays in four well-arranged classrooms in the Sokol Chicago Building. Yesterday's success 2will surely be the signal for continued public favor toward the school and its teaching staff.

    Few Bohemian schools in America can boast of a greater success than that achieved yesterday by the Vojta Naprstek School. On New Year's day the pupils of this school went ...

    Bohemian
    II B 2 f, III A, III B 2
  • Svenska Nyheter -- January 03, 1905
    Our Program (Editorial)

    The time is here for newspapers to announce their program, and the Svenska Nyheter is following the tradition established by its colleagues in Journalism.

    The people demand it - demand that once a year the newspaper speak of itself, as throughout the year it is speaking for itself.

    Irrespective of consequences, the Svenska Nyheter will, in the present year as in the past, remain independent and impartial in every field and in regard to everybody. When we make our hardest fight in favor of the sons of toil, those who carry the heavy load underneath a broiling sun, the reason is that we are strongly convinced of the justice in the demand for life's comforts, made by the producing masses, and we endorse the old saying, "He who will not work should not eat."

    2

    If we be blamed for not joining, with youthful ardor, in the battle between the political parties, our defense is that the party interests are being pulled down into the mire by vote-sellers, and the ideals are being overcast with mud by the leaders. For these reasons, we consider it degrading for a representative of the press, who still maintains the ideals of the press, to join the fight in those lairs.

    If, in the work for enlightening the people, we do not join hands with the religious leaders, the reason is, that, in our opinion, these leaders deviate from the road which leads to light and life.

    Svenska Nyheter will remain as many sided as possible. In addition to the latest news from Sweden, and reliable domestic and foreign reports compiled from interesting information from near and afar, we will present such special departments; as, "Questions of Law"; "Woman and the Home"; "Among the Sons of Toil"; "Portrait Gallery of Swedish-American Singers and Musicians"; etc. We value scientific and literary endeavors, and 3gladly make space for such activities. Our literary serials are more richly supplied than in any other Swedish-American newspaper. Our editorials are kept in strictly individual style, and are written to and for the people, invariably treating the most stirring questions of the day. We believe the people capable of doing their own thinking; we desire them to think straight and along broad lines, and to act in accordance with such thinking. Ever shall we fight those who would be the mental and political guardians of the people, in other words, those who would become the oppressors of the public.

    Svenska Nyheter is opposed to lotteries of any type, including the various guessing contests which create, among the subscribers, hopes which from the very inception are doomed to fail. We want new subscribers; but rather than gain them by dishonorable means we would cease as a newspaper......

    Svenska Nyheter costs only one dollar per year. We do not make any excessive promises for the future; we do not offer any "valuable premiums." We know our worth, and we invite the Swedish-American people to take advantage of our offerings.

    The time is here for newspapers to announce their program, and the Svenska Nyheter is following the tradition established by its colleagues in Journalism. The people demand it - demand ...

    Swedish
    II B 2 d 1, I L, I K, I H, III H, III C, I F 6, I F 5, II D 3
  • Chicago Chronicle -- January 03, 1905
    Jews to Assist African Colony

    In extending a helping hand to the work of advancing the Zionist movement, which seeks to secure a legally assured home and national state for the Jewish people, the Order of the Knights of Zion at the closing session of its 7th annual convention last night decided to assist in the work of educating, protecting, and helping the Jewish people in need in this country.

    At the close of the convention yesterday resolutions pledging the order to loyalty to America and urging the study of American institutions and the faithful performance of the duties of American citizenship were passed unanimously, and the West Chicago Club House, 50 Throop Street, where the convention was held, resounded with cheers for several minutes.

    The convention reiterated the pledge of the organization to the cause of Zionism and passed resolutions that the Order of the Knights of Zion will abide by and follow the decision of the Congress of the Zionists of the world at Basel, Switzerland, next March, in regard to the offer of the British government to found a Jewish state under the sovereignty of Great Britian in Uganda, Africa is concerned.

    2

    Will Assist Chicago Jews

    It was resolved in accordance with several of the addresses made, that the Order of the Knights of Zion would now take more interest in the various problems which are of local interest to the Jewish people in this and other American cities. The work of founding libraries, Sabbath schools, and lectures will now be carried on more extensively and it was decided that the work of charity among the needy Jewish people should be unified and properly supervised.

    Prejudice against the Jewish people wherever it may exist is to be combated by bringing the truth concerning the Jewish people to the knowledge of all. The resolutions urge also that the officers of the order proceed without delay to remedy the existing evils in this and other cities which are especially injurious to the Jewish people and to see to it that attacks upon Jewish peddlers and others are stopped.

    Take Interest in Charter

    In this connection it was resolved that the organization take active part in the 3making of new laws for Chicago and that it take special care to see that proper regulations are included in the proposed new charter to give the Jewish people protection from attacks and abuse.

    Hope to Dispel Prejudice

    "By actively participating in movements and matters which affect us as American citizens and by helping to dispel much of the prejudice against Jews among some people our order will be doing much and will still be within the true principles of Zionism," said Grand Master Zolotkoff. "We will do all in our power to help the grand cause which the late Dr. Hertzl advanced to such great proportions with the earnest and loyal co-operation of the good Jewish men from different countries. But we also take a hand in the condition of our people in this country and will work systematically to help them."

    In extending a helping hand to the work of advancing the Zionist movement, which seeks to secure a legally assured home and national state for the Jewish people, the Order ...

    Jewish
    III G, I C, III B 4
  • Svenska Nyheter -- January 03, 1905
    [Enighet Elects Officers]

    Enighet, a Chicago society, at its latest business meeting, elected the following officers, to serve from January to June 1905; president, Mr. Hans C. Stackel; vice president, Mr. Gust Swanson; recording secretary, Mr. Oscar Johnson; corresponding secretary, Mr. Louis Johnson; finance secretary, Mr. Frank Peterson; treasurer, Mr. Pit J. Peterson; librarian, Mr. Olaf Olson; marshal, Mr. Ellen Walin; vice marshal, Mr. Hanna Carlson; police officers, Mr. John A. Anderson, and Axel Olson; trustee, Mr. John Jacobson.

    Enighet, a Chicago society, at its latest business meeting, elected the following officers, to serve from January to June 1905; president, Mr. Hans C. Stackel; vice president, Mr. Gust Swanson; ...

    Swedish
    III B 2
  • Svenska Nyheter -- January 03, 1905
    The Argument of Folly (Summary of Editorial)

    A Swedish lecturer has gone up and down the land denouncing the American way of selecting the head of the nation, saying that the last presidential election cost over $25,000,000, which is more than the King costs Sweden in a hundred years. Jamestown, N. Y., the only city in America almost completely populated by Swedes, was the last stop in the lecturer's tour.

    A Swedish-American paper, Vartland, has come out in defense of the cost of elections stating that the expense is not born by the taxpayers but by friends of the presidential candidates, who pay the costs of the presidential campaign.

    Svenska Nyheter holds up Vartland's argument to ridicule and, in an editorial, raises the question of why the rich friend, big business and 2corporations contribute to a candidate's campaign expenses. Is it not in order to get returns from the president when elected? And after the election, do not these rich people rake in again, from workers and customers, the money spent in contributions? And again, does not the money spent at election demoralize thousands; and does not Vartland, which is at home in the Scriptures, know that such corruption involves the "loss of the soul"?

    The editorial asks Vartland for further explanation and is impatiently waiting to learn the truth.

    A Swedish lecturer has gone up and down the land denouncing the American way of selecting the head of the nation, saying that the last presidential election cost over $25,000,000, ...

    Swedish
    I E, I H
  • Lietuva -- January 06, 1905
    The Lithuanian Building and Loan Association

    There has been organized under the name of Simonas Daukantas, a new Lithuanian building and loan association. The first meeting was held on Jan. 2, 1905. The treasurer and all the directors are under bond. Meetings are held every Sunday at M. Mildazis' hall, 68 W. 25th St.

    All Lithuanians are invited to join this loan organization.

    Committee.

    There has been organized under the name of Simonas Daukantas, a new Lithuanian building and loan association. The first meeting was held on Jan. 2, 1905. The treasurer and all ...

    Lithuanian
    II A 2
  • Reform Advocate -- January 07, 1905
    (No headline)

    The Chicago Lying-In Hospital and Dispensary was founded in Feb., 1895. It began its work in four dark rented rooms in a big tenement on Maxwell St. The Y. M. H. C. A. appropriated $200 for its establishment and to this sum was added three subscriptions of $50 each from three well-known Jews. The times were unpropitious for the new institution and its struggle was hard. On several occasions financial disaster was very near, but each time a helping Jewish hand was offered and the crisis passed.

    The first quarters of the Dispensary proved inadequate and more room was obtained in a Methodist Mission. Soon these rooms were not large enough to accomodate the growing staff of doctors, students, and nurses and a large building was erected at Maxwell St. and Newberry Ave. This new structure cost $20,000 and was opened in May, 1904. There is also a sub-station dispensary on the North-West Side and one on the South Side.

    Since opening the first Dispensary on Maxwell St., the institution has offered 2courses of instruction to students and doctors of medicine.

    In 1899 the growing need of a haven, where patients requiring especial care could be sent, induced the Women's Board to open a lying-in hospital. A large house was rented at 294 Ashland Blvd., remodeled and furnished at a cost of $2,000, and on Sept. 2, the first patient was admitted. In the same year an incubator station was built in the hospital, the first of its kind in the U. S.

    In the ten years since the installation of the Maxwell St. Dispensary, nearly 6,000 women have been cared for in their own homes. In addition 2,000 other obstetric cases have been attended. 1,100 cases are being taken care of each year. At the Hospital 750 women have been confined and an additional 150 miscellaneous obstetric cases handled. 200 cases are being treated each year. 1,000 students and doctors have received special instruction in obstetric art and science and are now practicing these advanced teachings in the Central and Western states.

    The A. J. C. contributes $3,000 annually to the support of the institution.

    The Chicago Lying-In Hospital and Dispensary was founded in Feb., 1895. It began its work in four dark rented rooms in a big tenement on Maxwell St. The Y. M. ...

    Jewish
    II D 3, II D 1