The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Lietuva -- January 01, 1904
    On the New Year (Editorial)

    On New Year's Day, among Christians of the olden times, there was a custom of sending good wishes to friends and relatives. We also have many wishes for this coming year.

    The first of our desires is peace and mutual understanding between the so-called intellectuals and the newspapers. As long as the disputes and disagreements on minor things exist, we can accomplish nothing good for ourselves, for the society as a whole or for the nation. The most disreputable propaganda is spread by the clergy. The clergy attacks with the dirtiest denunciations, disregarding morals and ethics. The clergymen hold their secret conventions, in which they do not permit laymen to participate. If some loyal layman comes to the secret convention and opens his mouth against the schemes of the clergy, he is denounced as an infidel and is expelled from the convention.

    2

    The greatest aim of the clergy is to keep under their absolute control the parish schools in order to bring up the young Lithuanian generation as the slaves of the priests. Instead of giving moral and intellectual training in the parish schools, the clergy are trying their best to develop in the schools, fanatics, followers of the clergy, and denouncers of everything that is good for society and the nation.

    In this coming New Year, let us use more sense. Let us have strong workers' organizations, cooperative stores and small factories. Then we will not lack good schools. For this cause we ought to convince our brothers through facts and through logic, but not by denunciations and intrigues. By doing this we shall uplift our Lithuanians morally, intellectually, and economically.

    On New Year's Day, among Christians of the olden times, there was a custom of sending good wishes to friends and relatives. We also have many wishes for this coming ...

    Lithuanian
    III C, I E, I D 2 b, I A 2 a, II B 2 d 1
  • Revyen -- January 02, 1904
    [New Gymnastic Society on South Side]

    The latest Danish society is a gymnastic club on the South Side. The president is Mr. Friis and the teacher is John Jepsen, who recently came from Omaha, Nebraska. The society meets at 4033 South State Street. The gymnasium is available for gentlemen every Wednesday and Friday night, for ladies every Thursday and Saturday night.

    The latest Danish society is a gymnastic club on the South Side. The president is Mr. Friis and the teacher is John Jepsen, who recently came from Omaha, Nebraska. The ...

    Danish
    II B 3
  • L'italia -- January 02, 1904
    Christmas Party

    About 1700 Italian children were guests of the William Randolph Hearst League, at a Christmas Party. The party was preceded by an attendance of High Mass at the Church of the Guardian Angels on Farquer Street. The children had taken part in the Mission at the church during the year.

    A Christmas tree was loaded to capacity with presents for all present.

    About 1700 Italian children were guests of the William Randolph Hearst League, at a Christmas Party. The party was preceded by an attendance of High Mass at the Church of ...

    Italian
    III B 3 b, I C, III C
  • Scandia -- January 02, 1904
    Scandia

    Scandia has moved quite often lately. The reason for all this moving is that we must follow the trek of the Scandinavians as they move further West and Northwest. Scandia has moved from 811 North Western Avenue [Old number] to 661 West North Avenue [present number, 2440].

    Scandia has moved quite often lately. The reason for all this moving is that we must follow the trek of the Scandinavians as they move further West and Northwest. Scandia ...

    Norwegian
    II B 2 d 1
  • Revyen -- January 02, 1904
    [New Gymnastic Society on South Side]

    The latest Danish society is a gymnastic club on the South Side. The president is Mr. Friis and the teacher is John Jepsen, who recently came from Omaha, Nebraska. The society meets at 4033 South State Street. The gymnasium is available for gentlemen every Wednesday and Friday night, for ladies every Thursday and Saturday night.

    The latest Danish society is a gymnastic club on the South Side. The president is Mr. Friis and the teacher is John Jepsen, who recently came from Omaha, Nebraska. The ...

    Danish
    II B 3
  • Skandinaven -- January 03, 1904
    [New Gymnastic Society on South Side]

    A new Danish gymnastic society has been founded on the South Side. The president is K. Friis and the instructor is John Jepsen. The society has its gymnasium at 4033 South State Street. Sessions are held every Wednesday and Friday for men, and Thursday and Saturday for women.

    A new Danish gymnastic society has been founded on the South Side. The president is K. Friis and the instructor is John Jepsen. The society has its gymnasium at 4033 ...

    Danish
    II B 3
  • Skandinaven -- January 03, 1904
    [New Gymnastic Society on South Side]

    A new Danish gymnastic society has been founded on the South Side. The president is K. Friis and the instructor is John Jepsen. The society has its gymnasium at 4033 South State Street. Sessions are held every Wednesday and Friday for men, and Thursday and Saturday for women.

    A new Danish gymnastic society has been founded on the South Side. The president is K. Friis and the instructor is John Jepsen. The society has its gymnasium at 4033 ...

    Danish
    II B 3
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 04, 1904
    New Organization of Liberalminded

    A new central body of Liberalism has been created here recently, which took upon itself the task of working for the enlargment and the strengthening of the liberal movement. This organization calls itself the Central Liberal Community; it's main purpose is indicated by its name, that is to organize liberal-communities in Bohemian-American settlements. Meeting dates will be announced in the newspapers. The Central Liberal Community will come before the public for the first time on Jan. 6th in the Bohemian American Liberal School hall on 18th Street, where it has arranged to hold a demonstration meeting on this subject the Iroquois Theatre Catastrophe. Thus far Messrs. Bittner, Iska, and Zdrubek have agreed to speak.

    A new central body of Liberalism has been created here recently, which took upon itself the task of working for the enlargment and the strengthening of the liberal movement. This ...

    Bohemian
    II B 2 f, III C
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 04, 1904
    Patriotic Act

    During the annual meeting, held yesterday, by the stock-holders of the Garden City Brewing Company, which is owned and operated by Bohemian tavern keepers, $200 was unanimously and enthusiastically appropriated for the Old Peoples' Home and Orphanage. Bohemian tavern keepers, represented in the brewery showed that they are not only exceptional, businessmen, but genuine patriots.

    The report on the condition of the enterprise sounded very favorable; and with the excellent quality of the product of the Garden City Brewery, it could not be expected to be otherwise.

    During the annual meeting, held yesterday, by the stock-holders of the Garden City Brewing Company, which is owned and operated by Bohemian tavern keepers, $200 was unanimously and enthusiastically appropriated ...

    Bohemian
    II A 2, II D 5, II D 4
  • Svenska Nyheter -- January 05, 1904
    Freedom of Thought and Speech in Our Universities (Editorial)

    The native-born America will frequently brag about the great liberty of thought and speech prevailing in America, and scornfully laugh at the restrictive laws of the Old World. Like the Pharisee of the Bible, he thanks God that he is not like these others. He does not notice that this much-praised freedom is more or less of a phantom, which disappears with the shadows of the night. How can freedom live and thrive whom it is being supressed on its first appearance at the seats of learning in the country, that, is the institutions where freedom of thought and speech ought to have its real home? He who reads the news of the day and knows the manner of instruction at the institutions of higher learning in America cannot avoid seeing that this much-praised liberty has been forced to yield its place to a rule of oppression which paralyzes the tongue and fetters the mind as it [the mind] attempts to roam.

    2

    Only a few days ago, the faculty of Washburn university in Kansas ordered the dissolution of the student Socialist Club at the university. It is true that the faculty did not originate the order; the command originated with the capitalists in the East who control the university because they pay part of its expenses.

    The young men who belonged to the Socialist Club are not "dangerous socialists;" they are merely followers of the well-known minister, Charles M. Sheldon, who, in the book In His Steps, dared to suggest what Jesus might do if He were back on earth at the present time. The socialistic tendencies of the club did not meet with a favorable reception in the minds of the capitalists in question, and so there was an end to freedom of thought and speech at the university.

    But let it be supposed that the young men in question really were socialists. Is the purpose of our our universities to suppress all sociological investigation and simply teach subjects which have been sanctioned by the plutocrats? Do our philanthropists make special reservations regarding instruction when they 3make their donations to a school? If so, they are merely doing what they have a right to do. If the students at Washburn University in Kansas take up for discussion topics that may hurt the money lords in the East, then, of course, these money lords have the right to withhold further donations to the university. But if, on the other hand, the faculty of Washburn University prohibits the students from discussing topics which do not appeal to the money lords; [if they do this] merely to conform with the demands of a handful of selfish philanthropists, so as to get from these men a few thousand dollars each year, then Washburn University is no longer a university but simply a coffin in which thinking finds its grave.

    The native-born America will frequently brag about the great liberty of thought and speech prevailing in America, and scornfully laugh at the restrictive laws of the Old World. Like the ...

    Swedish
    I A 1 a, I D 1 a