The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Svenska Tribunen -- January 01, 1902
    The Swedish National Society

    The Swedish National Society, a well-known benevolent Society, has been very successful in helping needy countrymen during the past year. Over a thousand men and six hundred women have received employment during last year through the efforts of the Society. Over $1,100 has been distributed to poor people. The society is supported from the income of its Midsummer outdoor festivals and winter feasts at the Auditorium. Such a feast will be held there this year on February 6.

    The Swedish National Society, a well-known benevolent Society, has been very successful in helping needy countrymen during the past year. Over a thousand men and six hundred women have received ...

    Swedish
    II D 1, II D 8
  • Svenska Tribunen -- January 01, 1902
    [New Swedish Enterprise]

    The Chicago Swedish Cemetery Association was incorporated recently with a capital of $100, 00. The incorporators are: Eric Rosen, N. A. Nelson, and K. M. Olson.

    The Chicago Swedish Cemetery Association was incorporated recently with a capital of $100, 00. The incorporators are: Eric Rosen, N. A. Nelson, and K. M. Olson.

    Swedish
    II A 2
  • Abendpost -- January 03, 1902
    Christmas Echoes.

    Yesterday afternoon the monthly meeting of the "Columbia Ladies Club" took place at the Germanic Club House. Miss Louise Troost held an interesting lecture about "Christmas Music of the various nationa." The captivating explanations given in poetical language were made clear by a double-quartet of men's and boy's voices besides some soloists. Christmas carols in the German, English, Scandinavian, and Russian languages were recited, and made like the lecture itself, a deep impression upon the numerous club members.

    Yesterday afternoon the monthly meeting of the "Columbia Ladies Club" took place at the Germanic Club House. Miss Louise Troost held an interesting lecture about "Christmas Music of the various ...

    German
    II B 2 g, I C, III B 2, II A 3 b
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 04, 1902
    Jesuit Tricks

    The Benedictines, who have a Monastery on Allport Street and do everything imaginable there except that which would serve to honor the Roman Catholics and Bohemians in general, after the manner of Jesuits, do not stop to consider the method when they are concerned with the overpowering of an opponent. "The purpose indicates the method" is also their motto, but in this they differ from the Jesuits, in that the Jesuits really wanted to strengthen religion and defend its interests, whereas the Benedicts cared about nothing except, that they should be able to live well and merrily without working.

    For this purpose they pray, beg, threaten, call names, solicit, and also publish a newspaper. Narod is the exclusive organ of the Benedicts and not of the Catholics, because it only defends the interests of the Allport 2Monastery, and these, very often, are entirely different from those of Catholics in general, and Bohemians in particular.

    A favorite weapon, used almost in every issue of Narod is the lie. However, when it is really unsafe to publish a point-blank lie, Narod distorts the truth until it becomes impossible for any one to recognize it. Such is the case in that paper's reply, yesterday, to our article of Tuesday headed "Hrom A Peklo" (Thunder and Hell.) We called attention to the fact that the Benedicts controlled the proceedings of the meeting and, that only those people were elected upon the committee, who had their own business interests at heart in the damaging of Hlasatel. They were employees of Narod and stock-holders of Jednota. We proved, that both of these papers have very little reason to censure this paper from which, form instance, Jednota consistently clipped reports. All these facts were either distorted or cunningly concealed.

    3

    That we disagree with Narod often and in many ways, that we advocate an altogether different viewpoint, we will not and never shall wish to deny. Even our subscribers from among the Catholics do not bear us any ill-will on that account. If they liked Narod, if Jednota pleased them, they would have subscribed to the papers long ago, because the Benedicts in their press and in their pulpits, have worked for their papers. Whenever we write editionally, we have in mind the welfare of the various Bohemian peoples, and never the interests of the Allport Street Monastery; therefore, it is not to be wondered at, if Narod does not like our articles.

    The following sentence turned out remarkably for Narod: "Who was it, that so boldly and falsely accused the Right Reverend Abbott Jaeger, Supreme Head of the Bohemian Catholics of Chicago, in the famous article which appeared in the Tribune? We did not accuse anyone. If we had done so, the Rev. Jaeger would have made use of it as he had threatened, and would have destroyed the "hateful" Hlasatel with one blow. He would not allow such 4an opportunity to pass had he the slightest hope of success. We brought this article and it was to our advantage that the Rev. Jaeger sent the correction to the Tribune. We are convinced, that the correction would never have been made if we had not called attention to the libel. Furthermore, there are many who maintain, that the actual writers of this libel had the main "say" at the Sunday meeting, called against Hlasatel. Also, we cannot understand how the Abbott Jaeger comes by his title "Supreme Head of the Bohemian Catholics of Chicago." We know that he is the Supreme Head of the Allport Street Monastery, but that he is some sort of Supreme Head, either elected or appointed, of all Bohemian Catholics of Chicago, of that we had no idea. Besides we are in free America; and since we are free to criticize the actions of the President, the Archbishop or the Pope, Narod must admit, that we will dare, at all times, to criticize the acts of the Rev. Jaeger or the Reverend's brothers.

    So far as morality is concerned Narod is the least entitled to give lectures about it to anyone. The hypocrisy and lie, which it cultivates, are not morality. One of the most foolish lies that Narod ever published was its assertion, that we organized some sort of secret society. Such 5societies, as it has in mind, were in existence long before Hlasatel saw the light of the world and were no Bohemian invention, but were spread among us from the circles of America, Irish, and German youth.

    To be sure, a lie more or less will make no difference to Narod. It is so "moral," that it is not capable of writing the truth, it only lies, baits and abuses. Even the members of the lowest secret society would be ashamed of such morality."

    The Benedictines, who have a Monastery on Allport Street and do everything imaginable there except that which would serve to honor the Roman Catholics and Bohemians in general, after the ...

    Bohemian
    II B 2 d 1, I C, III C
  • Skandinaven -- January 05, 1902
    Hay, Root, and Wilson

    A correspondent of the daily press, who is generally well informed, is authority for the statement that Hay, Root, and Wilson are to remain in the cabinet. That is good news. Colonel Hay is probably the most accomplished diplomat in America today and his conduct of the State Department has been attended with brilliant success.

    During the early stages of the Boer War he was exposed to considerable criticism, but time has demonstrated that it had no justification whatever. On the contrary, the government in Washington went to the very limit of permissible interference in behalf of the Boer republics. Had its example been followed by the great powers of Europe the unfortunate and unjustifiable war in South Africa would probably have been ended long ago on conditions acceptable to the heroic Boers.

    Secretary Hay's management of the complicated Chinese question is the brightest and the most honorable chapter in the history of modern diplomacy, while the Hay-Pauncefote 2Treaty, as finally formulated and ratified, removes the only dishonorable blotch upon the diplomatic records of the nation, and opens the way for America to carry out the great undertaking that is destined to assure her position as the mistress of two oceans.

    Colonel Hay's ability, signal success, and broad-gauged patriotism have won for him the implicit confidence of the American people. The announcement that he is to remain at the head of the State Department during President Roosevelt's administration has been hailed with general satisfaction by voters of all parties throughout the country.

    Mr. Root is the most successful and popular of all secretaries of the War Department in recent years. His firm grasp of the various problems connected with our island possessions and our relations to Cuba renders his services well nigh indispensable.

    As for Mr. Wilson, it is sufficient to say that the farmers of the country would like to have him appointed Secretary of Agriculture in perpetuity.

    3

    With Hay, Root and Wilson remaining, and an acceptable successor to Gage in the Treasury Department, President Roosevelt will have a strong cabinet even if all of the other portfolios were to be regarded as lesser lights.

    A correspondent of the daily press, who is generally well informed, is authority for the statement that Hay, Root, and Wilson are to remain in the cabinet. That is good ...

    Norwegian
    I J, I G
  • Svenska Tribunen -- January 08, 1902
    The Swedish National Society Presents Benefit Play

    A Swedish historical play, called "Engelbrekt and his Dalkarlar" by Aug. Blanche, will be presented at the Auditorium February 6 by the Swedish National Society. The income from the play goes to needy countrymen.

    A Swedish historical play, called "Engelbrekt and his Dalkarlar" by Aug. Blanche, will be presented at the Auditorium February 6 by the Swedish National Society. The income from the play ...

    Swedish
    II D 1, II B 1 c 1
  • Svenska Tribunen -- January 08, 1902
    [Prominent Swede Wins in Skate Meet]

    Charles Erickson, a member of the Monitor Club, won the first prize at the Skate races at Humboldt Park, New Year's Day. He rode the fixed distance, two miles, in six minutes and seven seconds.

    Charles Erickson, a member of the Monitor Club, won the first prize at the Skate races at Humboldt Park, New Year's Day. He rode the fixed distance, two miles, in ...

    Swedish
    II B 3, IV
  • Svenska Tribunen -- January 08, 1902
    [Swedes Give Benefit Festival]

    Verdandi Lodge No. 3, I. O. S. held its annual New Year's feast at Spelz Hall last Saturday night. Stereoptican views were shown. Music and songs were also on the program, which ended with a ball. Refreshments were served.

    The Swedish Home for Aged will receive a certain per cent of the net income from the feast.

    Verdandi Lodge No. 3, I. O. S. held its annual New Year's feast at Spelz Hall last Saturday night. Stereoptican views were shown. Music and songs were also on the ...

    Swedish
    III B 2, II D 10, II B 2 e
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 09, 1902
    [Immigrants Charged with Lower Wages]

    American employees and employers alike, charge immigrants are guilty of lowering wages and creating competition through cheap labor. We must admit that this accusation is partly true. The immigrant upon his arrival in this land is ignorant of local conditions and easily becomes the instrument of conscienceless profiteers, almost always Americans. Various henchmen work to deliver the immigrant into sweatshops, where he is forced to labor to exhaustion for such low wages that this promised land becomes a hell on earth for him, and he the unwilling tool that hurts the interests of all other workingmen. It is the duty of American Bohemians to so conduct themselves that such an accusation can not be made against our countrymen. We should take care of this, both individually and collectively. In this matter we must again point to the Germans, who have immigration offices in all the larger cities, where the immigrant is given information and help, and in some instances, a job is procured for him.

    Bohemian labor organizations and societies ought to take this matter under consideration, and endeavor to put our immigrant brothers on the right road, so that they may not become the victims of bad people through their own unfamiliarity with local conditions.

    American employees and employers alike, charge immigrants are guilty of lowering wages and creating competition through cheap labor. We must admit that this accusation is partly true. The immigrant upon ...

    Bohemian
    III G, I C, I H, III A
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 09, 1902
    Immigration Restriction

    We take notice of all sorts of things; we take sides according to political or religious beliefs; we want to force our convictions upon one another; we argue about trifles; while the enemies, not only of us, but of all immigrants, industriously and harmoniously work against and dangerously threaten our existence. In Congress, there was introduced a whole batch of proposals directed at the restriction of immigration. These proposals, if they become law, along with those which are directed against anarchists and other radicals, who, however, have an anti-immigration tendency, will have the effect that, in forty or fifty years, Bohemian-Americans will not fight or argue among themselves - because there will not be any here. No one among us takes any notice of this danger which threatens us.

    The Germans, in all the larger American cities, have already banded together and are violently agitating against this restriction of immigration. They can accomplish nothing, however, if they are not supported by all the other immigrant groups, and all reasonable Americans, who realize that this land owes its growth to the industry and merits of the immigrants. It is about 2time for Bohemians to come to some kind of an understanding as to what should interest all of us and quickly and harmoniously defend it.

    We take notice of all sorts of things; we take sides according to political or religious beliefs; we want to force our convictions upon one another; we argue about trifles; ...

    Bohemian
    III G, I C