The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 01, 1901
    New Year's Eve Festivities

    Twelve o'clock. A small droning church bell proclaims the midnight hour; its knell stops the jovial Thespian pleasures and silences the orchestra. Thus we live, thus we live; we all live that way.

    The Chicago Gymnastic Association was celebrating at the North Side Hall. Sudden darkness, music come to a dead stop, dance steps come to a halt, as an unearthly pandemonium reverberated in the hall. From every nook and corner, galleries, stage, and the smaller meeting halls one heard the terrific whistling, honking, megaphone calls, concussions, the sibilant exclamations of an enthusiastic assembly, and other unclassified noises. In this manner, the Gymnasts greeted the New Year and the new century.

    2

    Last night's Sylvester ball was a genuinely friendly affair, wherein the tide of joy mounted to transcendental heights. A large crowd was present and the arrangements perfect. The committee which functioned so commendably and made the affair a success, consisted of eleven Turner members.

    The Turner Pioneers made up the reception committee. The singing division of the Gymnastic association appeared in full numbers and regaled the gathering with several selections.

    At The Frohsinn

    Contentment reigned last night; true happiness in conformity to the Sylvester custom among German singers, a delightful, exceedingly merry crowd, the like of which has not been witnessed for many a day. The singing club Frohsinn [Contentment], which celebrated at the South Side 3Turnhall, attracted many celebrants, and regardless of the multitude, it was a very sociable affair. The program was arranged by the members Charles Hartung, Charles Luedecke, and Adolph Hook. The gentlemen offered excellent selections; they provided humor, took good care of the occasion, and complied with the social character of the event.

    The main attraction, undoubtedly, was the allegorical group "End of the 19th, beginning of the 20th century." At the midnight hour thousands of small cards, bearing good wishes from the Frohsinn, were scattered over the crowd.

    At The Germania

    Adhering to custom, the members of the Germania Male Chorus celebrated the event at their club house. A splendid ball and banquet were on the 4program to commemorate the approach of the new century. The principal speaker of the evening was Joseph Brucker "The old succumbs; times change and new life sprouts among the ruins. A few more fleeting moments ere the iron-mouthed chimes and steam whistles proclaim the new century, the approaching period of another historical era. What may it bring, this new-born child's destiny,which reminds us of Schiller.

    "'With festive melodies of hapiness,

    It greets the beloved child,

    In life's first venture,

    Repose and sleep;

    Obscure and joyful fate

    Still rests in the lap of time.'

    "Schiller, at the beginning of the 19th century, wrote to a friend: 'Precious Friend: Where are the portals leading to peace,and the haven of security? The past century was enshrowded in storm, the new commences with murder.'"

    5

    The speaker then continued, expressing his own views. "After a hundred years," he said, "France's sword lost its power and thereby Germany acquired might and recognition. This rebirth of a nation is one of the outstanding deeds of the century which will imprint its mark also in the coming hundred years.

    "' How inspiring to behold thee, with thy palm branch,

    On the brink of the century!'

    "When Schiller spoke these words he thought of the land which broke the despicable, enslaving shackles of despotism. We Germans, at least the older men, were present during Germany's rebirth and our future generations will envy us. We shall never witness a repetition of such monumental splendor, our examplary poets at the turn of the century, the liberation from the Napoleonic yoke, its gigantic struggle against the hereditary enemy in 1870, and our re-creation through Bismarck, the 6great Chancelor. Verily, in retrospection we Germans may look with pride and satisfaction upon the last century. Justified confidence, fortified with the knowledge of the present, strong will power, as well as unflinching diligence, should enable us to traverse the threshold of the coming hundred years.

    "Simultaneously, as Germany forged its destiny in Europe, a titanic empire grew on this side of the Atlantic ocean. Emerging from a small beginning, it developed into the North American Union, with which we are affiliated as citizens. Only a hundred years ago, the territory west of the Mississippi did not belong to the Union; nor Flordia and other lands on the Gulf of Mexico. The most reckless prophets never would have ventured to predict that the Union banner might flutter on the Pacific coast within such a comparatively brief span of time.

    "I shall not recite history. But this is definite. What the 19th century 7shaped so well with blood and iron, the German nation and the American Union will strengthen for the protection of right, liberty, art, sience, progress, and culture.

    "Fortune helps the strong," an old, proven proverb. But where is a race stronger than the American? What nation has a more intriusic and intensive spirit?

    "Here, at the threshold of the 20th century, I predict that our country will be the leader among the people of the world. America is destined to become the great connecting link between the old world in Europe and the still older continent of Asia.

    "It is but natural that we are exulant in being a part of this gigantic nation and we may look towards the future with serene confidence. We 8did our share in building and embellishing it in the German manner, that our offspring may bless the day when we landed on these hospitable shores.

    "But finally, let us quote the poet: [Ten verses, 80 lines follow. Transl.]

    Whatever the future may decree, nothing can make us submissive.

    "The call, the year begins anew

    Drones from resonant bells;

    But the hour finds us

    Unified, joyful, and faithful."

    Twelve o'clock. A small droning church bell proclaims the midnight hour; its knell stops the jovial Thespian pleasures and silences the orchestra. Thus we live, thus we live; we all ...

    German
    III B 3 a, I J, III H
  • Narod Polski -- January 02, 1901
    Dear Brothers

    The old year has past, with its record of work, accomplishments and battles.

    We are a year older, but a year older in experience. Through our mind flit moments of happiness and success, painful thoughts of the loss of a loved one, - in a word - we take stock of the past year and count our gains and losses.

    The old year is closing the nineteenth century. We are standing at the gates of a New Year and a new century, and look with fear before us, for no one knows what awaits us, what losses to expect, whom death will take from our circle of friends and relatives.

    The past was most successful for us, dear brothers.

    As children of one mother, our Holy Church, and sons of our country, we should and must always cling together.

    Divided, we will always wander and fall, temptations will lead us astray, off the straight road, and we will and in a mire of unbelief, with which we are surrounded, on all sides, but we will not fall, if we hold to our faith, together.

    2

    Poland was so long great, as she served God faithfully, but when her faith cooled, God forsook her and delivered her to her enemies.

    We wanderers should never forget, that we are Catholics and Poles belonging to a nation that by her greatness and honorable character has shown the way to other nations.

    Let us faithfully guard our treasures, let us increase in the New Year our number of members, with the same zeal as in the past year.

    Let us offer our work for the Polish Roman Catholic Union to the Heart of Jesus and ask our guardian "The Blessed Virgin of Czestochowa," to intercede to Her Son for us to shorten our wandering. Let us make a resolution to live in harmony and Christian charity, and work for one another and all for one.

    Do not forget, dear brothers, to fill our legions with young members.

    Urge the young brothers to join us and always and everywhere by words and actions, prove that we are Poles and faithful sons of our church, and if it is God's will, the sun of freedom will again rise upon us.

    3

    We wish you and your families every success, and God's blessings in the New Year.

    We hope that you will continue to help us in our work and perform your duties to the Polish Roman-Catholic Union faithfully.

    Our sisters and members of the Polish Roman-Catholic Union we also wish success in furthering their organization and blessings of God in their work.

    The Venerable Clergy, who so warmly support our organization, we give sincere thanks for their efforts up to this time and ask them to continue in the coming year to give us their support and help us grow.

    The more members, the larger our circle, the longer we stay in our battles with the enemy, the sooner we will attain to the ideals and aims of the Polish Roman-Catholic Union.

    Management of the Polish Roman Catholic Union

    The old year has past, with its record of work, accomplishments and battles. We are a year older, but a year older in experience. Through our mind flit moments of ...

    Polish
    III B 2, III A, III C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 03, 1901
    Trusts Without End Liveries and Undertakers Combine

    The North side is usually progressive and in the lead, giving us both good and bad examples for emulation, but as a matter of variety it now supplies the latter. The livery owners and undertakers have formed a trust, and their first official transaction revolved about a mere matter of price. The rates for coaches have been increased from 4 and 5 to 5 and 6. During the last decade the customary change was 4 for the ride to Graceland or Bonifacious cemeteries, and 5 to all others. But now the gentlemen of the trust consider this an insufficient remuneration. Horses, coaches, harness, feed, and wages have risen, so according to their opinion, one need not look frantically for suitable pretext to justify the increase. The new "trust" has been organized as follows: Charles Burmeister, President; A.M. Schillo, secretary; W.A. Hinkins, treasurer.

    2

    Mr. Burmeister declared the general price increase in the aforementioned items raises the maintenance const of every coach; livery owners must shell out an additional $80 per year. The world has become more exacting in so far as funerals are concerned; the people demand the most modern equipment, imposing horses, immaculate drivers in uniform, and all that sort of stuff; money really is no object. Since the funeral coaches are mostly rented from livery owners, and as these gentlemen are adamant, we the undertakers obviously must comply.

    The permanent organization will be considered sometime next week. And thus the jacked up price does not affect the dead, but the living who are obliged to pay the bill.

    The North side is usually progressive and in the lead, giving us both good and bad examples for emulation, but as a matter of variety it now supplies the latter. ...

    German
    I D 1 b
  • Katalikas -- January 03, 1901
    National Field (Editorial)

    We started our third year of work for the benefit of Roman-Catholics in America. We consider our native language and religion as the greatest fortune which we brought from our fatherland to this strange land called America. Religion and language is our entire fortune, which we received from our fathers and which we must keep as a sacred relic. The fatherland is our second mother, our country in which we grew up, made our livelihood and spent the best days of our lives. It is heartbreaking for everyone of us to think how we spent our days of youth in Lithuania. How happy we were there with no worry at all. Our childhood days in Lithuania are glorious memoirs of the past. It makes one feel happy to think of our childhood days when we played our games with a great joy and never dreamed of our future, for we were well contented with the present. We were just like any other children, never worried about tomorrow or the next day; we had not the slightest shade of worry on our faces; we never thought of facing future problems and we had no idea that we would face our 2problems somewhere in a strange land of which we never dreamed in our childhood days.

    Many of us suffered injustice and hardship in Lithuania under the Russian government; yet, there were many happy days in our childhood when we lived in our native land. Even those who lead an easy life in America think with envy about the happy days of youth spent in Lithuania. It is hard to forget a beautiful meadow in the month of May, especially when flowers are blooming and birds are singing.

    We cannot forget our language, religion and fatherland. Language, religion and fatherland are sacred things to us, which we must always carry in our hearts.

    Therefore, Katalikas, has a difficult problem to solve in order to help their Catholic brothers in America. Katalikas will make every effort to help brothers in their needs and will help to enlighten them in their lives.

    3

    We hope that all disagreements will end among our brothers during the 19th century and solidarity will prevail among our people who are living in America. It would be much better to put aside all unnecessary quarrels and separating into many groups, instead of maintaining a strong national unity. We cannot accomplish much if we split into many groups.

    In order to accomplish something worthwhile we must unite and work together for our fatherland and our brothers who are suffering hardships across the sea.

    We started our third year of work for the benefit of Roman-Catholics in America. We consider our native language and religion as the greatest fortune which we brought from our ...

    Lithuanian
    II B 2 d 1, III H, III A, III C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 05, 1901
    German Society Statement of Activities During December 1900 and Last Quarter of Past Year

    The administration of the German Society held a regular session yesterday under the leadership of its president, Theo. Brentano.

    Charles Spaeth, business manager, submitted his report for December. During the month, 148 applications for assistance were filed and 143 were considered. Support was given to 93 families with 278 children, and to 50 single persons. This entailed an expenditure of $466.17. In fifteen cases room and board were paid; thirteen tons of coal were distributed among twenty-five parties; shoes were provided in ten cases.

    Membership dues amounted to $125. Mr. Max joined the society, paying 2$5 for a one-year membership.

    Employment was found for 234 persons. We received requests from employers for 246 men. We received 258 communications and mailed 263 letters and cards in connection with our employment activities.

    During the last three months, October to December 1900, the German Society helped 195 families and 557 children, and 107 single persons. We supplied 21 pairs of shoes, 46 half-ton loads of coal, paid room and board in 27 cases. Our expense was $1,037.84. Membership contributions during the same period were $706.

    During the last quarter we obtained employment for 864 persons; 831 communications comprising requests for jobs and offers from employers were received, and our list shows that we mailed 933 letters and cards.

    3

    As a result of the many unfortunate strikes which affected certain classes of workers, increased requests were made to our society during this quarter.

    In order to enable us to continue the humanitarian work of allaying suffering among German families, and even enlarging the scope of our endeavors, we urgently implore all financially able German compatriots in Chicago to become affiliated with our organization.

    The administration of the German Society held a regular session yesterday under the leadership of its president, Theo. Brentano. Charles Spaeth, business manager, submitted his report for December. During the ...

    German
    II D 10, II D 1, II D 8
  • Revyen -- January 05, 1901
    [Revyen's Political and Economic Views] (Summary)

    Revyen is interested in socialism, but does not wish to join any particular socialist party. Revyen does not like the Republican party, which it considers merely a capitalistic party. In 1896 the paper supported the Democrats, because it thought that this party would help the workingmen, but the last four years have shown that there is really no difference between the two major parties in American politics; they both stand for capitalism.

    Revyen is for reform. It fully understands that much has to happen and many years will pass before the laboring class gets the majority of votes in the United States. Revyen wishes to work for the economic independence of the common people; any reform that will bring us nearer to this goal has the paper's full support.

    Revyen is interested in socialism, but does not wish to join any particular socialist party. Revyen does not like the Republican party, which it considers merely a capitalistic party. In ...

    Danish
    II B 2 d 1, I E
  • Revyen -- January 05, 1901
    [Paul Geleff Praises Revyen]

    The well-known socialist leader, Paul Geleff, who thirty years ago was deported from Denmark for his political activities, has written a letter to Revyen in which he expresses his joy over the fine work the paper is doing in the interest of socialism and social democracy.

    Paul Geleff was at that time owner of a little store at Pueblo and the editor of The Colorado Investor.

    The well-known socialist leader, Paul Geleff, who thirty years ago was deported from Denmark for his political activities, has written a letter to Revyen in which he expresses his joy ...

    Danish
    II B 2 d 1, I E
  • Revyen -- January 05, 1901
    [Socialism]

    The well-known socialist leader, Paul Geleff, who 30 years ago was deported from Denmark for his political activities, has written a letter to Revyen in which he expresses his joy over the fine work the paper is doing in the interest of Socialism and social democracy.

    Paul Geleff was at that time owner of a little store at Pueblo and the editor of "The Colorado Investor".

    The well-known socialist leader, Paul Geleff, who 30 years ago was deported from Denmark for his political activities, has written a letter to Revyen in which he expresses his joy ...

    Danish
    I F 3, I E
  • Revyen -- January 05, 1901
    [Paul Geleff Praises Revyen]

    The well-known socialist leader, Paul Geleff, who thirty years ago was deported from Denmark for his political activities, has written a letter to Revyen in which he expresses his joy over the fine work the paper is doing in the interest of socialism and social democracy.

    Paul Geleff was at that time owner of a little store at Pueblo and the editor of The Colorado Investor.

    The well-known socialist leader, Paul Geleff, who thirty years ago was deported from Denmark for his political activities, has written a letter to Revyen in which he expresses his joy ...

    Danish
    II B 2 d 1, I E
  • Revyen -- January 05, 1901
    [Political Matters]

    In an article in Revyen the editor writes that the paper is interested in Socialism, but that it does not want to join any specific socialistic party.

    The paper does not like the Republican party, which it regards as a merely capitalistic party. In 1896 the paper supported the Democrats because it thought that this party would help the workingmen, but the last four years have shown that really there is no difference between the two major parties in American politics; they both stand for the capitalism.

    The paper is for reform and it fully understands that much has to happen and many years will pass before the laboring class will get the majority of votes in United States. The paper wants to work for the economic independence of the common people, and any reform that will bring us nearer this goal has the full support of Revyen.

    In an article in Revyen the editor writes that the paper is interested in Socialism, but that it does not want to join any specific socialistic party. The paper does ...

    Danish
    I F 3, I E