The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Narod Polski -- January 03, 1900
    [Poles Urged to Attend Public Evening Schools.]

    All adults of Polish origin and of absolutely decent behavior are urged to study English in the public evening schools.

    All adults of Polish origin and of absolutely decent behavior are urged to study English in the public evening schools.

    Polish
    I A 3
  • Lietuva -- January 05, 1900
    The Protest of 'St. John Baptist Society' against the Lies of Katalikas

    Chicago, December 10, 1899, the Society of St. John Baptist held its meetin the church hall, 33rd Street and Auburn Avenue. At this meeting the members decided to make a protest against the newspaper Katalikas for publishing the lying article in the No. 49 of the newspaper, that the St. John Baptist Society was trying to wrong the St. Martin Society's banquet; that it would have its own banquet on November 29, while the St. Martin's Theatrical Society was to hold its banquet then and it was advertised for several weeks.

    Is there any truth? Does the Katalikas' editor have no shame for publishing such lies in his newspaper, which has such a prominent name as Katalikas? It seems that under good names good deeds are not always made. The saying is, "That the dog's voice does not go to heaven," therefore, the lies of Katalikas will not reach even the ears of good people.

    2

    To say that our society did not advertise its banquet! Let the Katalikas' editor look in No. 37 of Lietuva, September 15, and it will find the same advertisement of our society as it was advertised on November 26.

    Furthermore, the Katalikas is lying in saying that the St. John Baptist's Society, by trying to wrong the St. Martin's Society, had no profit from its banquet, because there were few people at our banquet. The Katalikas is lying without shame. There were many people and we had a fair profit.

    At last, the Katalikas demands that we should expel from our society all the followers of Olszewski. On the Katalikas' demand we reply that from this New Year, Katalikas should not stick his nose where it does not belong, and that it should stop lying; that the Katalikas should not interfere any more in the affairs of St. John Baptist's Society.

    The Society of St. John Baptist have been friendly with the Theatrical Society of St. Martin. There were no disputes between these two societies; they always worked together and sold each other tickets of banquets or performances.

    3

    We must say that when the lying article was published in Katalikas, the delegates of our society went to the Katalikas' editor and demanded that he repeal his lies and publish our protest, but the Katalikas refused to do so.

    The St. John Baptist Society

    Gecewycze, President

    Zilivilis, Secretary.

    Chicago, December 10, 1899, the Society of St. John Baptist held its meetin the church hall, 33rd Street and Auburn Avenue. At this meeting the members decided to make a ...

    Lithuanian
    III C, IV, II B 2 d 1
  • Lietuva -- January 05, 1900
    Appeal

    We, the Committee of the Lithuanian Roman-Catholic Parish the Providence of God, see the necessity of establishing in Chicago another Lithuanian parish than that which was incorporated in 1895.

    Therefore, we appeal to all the Roman-Catholic Lithuanians who feel that they need another parish in Chicago, come to the meeting on Saturday, January 6, 1900, at 7 P. M., Szemaitis Hall, 632 S. Canal St. If other nations can uphold several parishes, the Lithuanians also can have another parish. All the Lithuanian Catholics are invited.

    Committee.

    P. S. Those who want to get more information about this new parish affairs, call at the parish secretary, Alex Gudenauskis, 55 W. 15th St., Chicago.

    We, the Committee of the Lithuanian Roman-Catholic Parish the Providence of God, see the necessity of establishing in Chicago another Lithuanian parish than that which was incorporated in 1895. Therefore, ...

    Lithuanian
    III C
  • Revyen -- January 06, 1900
    [Revyen's Success in Securing New Readers] (Summary)

    From 1898 to 1899 Revyen secured three hundred new subscribers, and from 1899 to 1900, five hundred more. This is a greater relative increase in circulation than that of any other Scandinavian paper in the United States.

    From 1898 to 1899 Revyen secured three hundred new subscribers, and from 1899 to 1900, five hundred more. This is a greater relative increase in circulation than that of any ...

    Danish
    II B 2 d 1
  • Reform Advocate -- January 06, 1900
    (No headline)

    At the commencement exercises on Tuesday afternoon at the University of Chicago, President Harper announced that gifts amounting to $550,000 had been presented to the University. The second largest donation was $50,000 from Mr. Leon Mandel for an assembly hall, to be known as the Leon Mandel Assembly Hall. The structure will be located on Lexington Ave., near 57th st Mr. Mandel's donation is the largest ever made by a Jewish individual in the west, to an educational institution.

    A contribution of $10,000 was made by Mr. Berthold Lowenthal for the establishment of the Joseph P. Lowenthal fellowship in chemistry.

    Mr. Morris Selz contributed $3,000, E. S. Selz, $15,00, and J. Harry Selz, $500, amounting to $5,000 in all, for the establishment of the Lillian Gertrude Selz scholarship.

    At the commencement exercises on Tuesday afternoon at the University of Chicago, President Harper announced that gifts amounting to $550,000 had been presented to the University. The second largest donation ...

    Jewish
    I A 1 d, II C
  • Scandia -- January 06, 1900
    A Subsidized Fleet (Editorial)

    The Republicans in Congress are bent on passing a law appropriating some million dollars a year in subsidies to American shipbuilders or to American steamships in foreign trade. Heretofore most of the American shipping to Europe and other continents has been done in foreign vessels; these are cheaper to build and cheaper to operate; they can therefore accept lower rates than American ships. This is the reason why American goods have been carried by European ships; it is cheaper. American shippers who are not in business for their health alone will not pay American steamers higher freight rates than European. If the American steamers accepted the same freight rates, they would sail at a loss; but for the pleasure of seeing American goods shipped in American vessels, Congress will pay the difference. American steamship owners are told: go ahead and accept the same freight rates as European ships; you will lose by it, but never mind, Uncle Sam will foot the bill. The people at large will 2have to pay some millions more in taxes (as they always do, to help capital) in order to see more American steamers employed in foreign trade.

    A few years ago, Captain John Anderson, of Chicago, president of the American Steam Barge Company, in order to show the necessity of subsidies, pointed out that a steamship which costs $500,000 to build in the United States can be built in Great Britain for $300,000; the American ship therefore costs $15,000 a year more in interest and insurance.

    Then Captain Anderson, who certainly knows what he is talking about, asserted that while an American tramp steamer of 4,000 tons needs 34 men, he has seen English 6,000-tonners that can get along with 26 men; and each of these men receives smaller wages and poorer fare than the Americans. While it costs 75 cents a day to board the sailors on American steamers, the English sailors are satisfied with fare that costs about 35 cents a day.

    In order to establish a few American steamship lines and enable them to compete 3with European lines, Captain Anderson wants something like $5,000,000 a year.

    The Republicans in Congress are bent on passing a law appropriating some million dollars a year in subsidies to American shipbuilders or to American steamships in foreign trade. Heretofore most ...

    Norwegian
    I D 1 a, IV
  • Revyen -- January 06, 1900
    [Revyen's Success in Securing New Readers] (Summary)

    From 1898 to 1899 Revyen secured three hundred new subscribers, and from 1899 to 1900, five hundred more. This is a greater relative increase in circulation than that of any other Scandinavian paper in the United States.

    From 1898 to 1899 Revyen secured three hundred new subscribers, and from 1899 to 1900, five hundred more. This is a greater relative increase in circulation than that of any ...

    Danish
    II B 2 d 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 06, 1900
    German Society

    The Board of Directors of the German Society held its regular monthly meeting yesterday afternoon at which Mr. Wilhelm Vocke, the president of the society, presided. The following report was given by the society's business manager which covers the society's activities for the month of December 1899: Of the 190 cases applying for help, 179 have received consideration. Furthermore, help has been extended to 129 families and 48 single persons, and 203 persons received employment. During the past three months the German Society extended help to 263 families, including 803 children and 138 single persons. The society purchased and distributed 33 pairs of shoes, 79 half tons of coal, and in 56 instances paid for food and rent, with a total expenditure of $1,362.40 against the income of paid membership dues to $711.00.

    The Board of Directors of the German Society held its regular monthly meeting yesterday afternoon at which Mr. Wilhelm Vocke, the president of the society, presided. The following report was ...

    German
    II D 10, IV, III B 2
  • L'italia -- January 06, 1900
    A Benefit Concert

    Tomorrow, at 2 P.M., in the hall at 122 W. Lake Street, Professor Modestino Mastro, Albert and Ettore Gualano will give a benefit-concert to help our poor compatriot, A. Cianci. A conference will also be held on social betterment. The benefit committee consists of V. Di Pirro, S. Falone, F. Berardi, D. De Cristoforo, S. Muffeletto, A. Liberatore, and G. Quartullo.

    With ardour and earnestness, President V. Di Pirro is inviting the colony to attend. Tickets are $.25. We are sure that the colony will not fail to attend in response to this charity-call. I am sure you will all spend a splendid afternoon listening to the fine music.

    Tomorrow, at 2 P.M., in the hall at 122 W. Lake Street, Professor Modestino Mastro, Albert and Ettore Gualano will give a benefit-concert to help our poor compatriot, A. Cianci. ...

    Italian
    II A 3 b, I H, II D 10, II B 2 g
  • Reform Advocate -- January 06, 1900
    (No headline)

    Henry Foreman died December 31st, at his residence, 3418 Vernon Ave., at the age of 82 years. The deceased was born in Dermstein, Germany, July, 1817, and migrated to the United States in 1838. He came to Chicago in 1854 and founded the firm of Foreman Brothers. His partners were Gerhard, Benjamin and Joseph Foreman. The firm's place of business was first located on South Water street, and then on East Lake street. In 1867 the firm dissolved and Henry Foreman retired permanently from active business. Foreman Brothers was the oldest wholesale clothing house in Chicago.

    Henry Foreman died December 31st, at his residence, 3418 Vernon Ave., at the age of 82 years. The deceased was born in Dermstein, Germany, July, 1817, and migrated to the ...

    Jewish
    IV, V A 1, II A 2