The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Skandinaven -- January 14, 1898
    A Flashlight Needed (Editorial)

    Despite the mouthings and mumblings of certain newspapers and a lot of cheap politicians, the investigations of Kipley's "foinest" by Senator Berry's committee is of great interest to the people of Chicago. The evil effects of the disorganization of the force since Mr. Kipley assumed control of the department have been felt in all parts of the city, but probably nowhere to such an extent as by the 100,000 people residing within the Thirty-second Police Precinct. During the administration of Captain Larsen, of the West Chicago Avenue Station, the police service of the Thirty-second Precinct attained a very high degree of efficiency. He was one of the very best captains of the force; he knew his men and had them well in hand. He also knew the thugs and crooks and had them well under control.

    2

    All this, Mr. Kipley knew as well as anyone else. He knew that the service of the West Chicago Avenue Station could not be improved, and that the best he could do would be to let well enough alone. And yet he proceeded to reduce Captain Larsen to the rank of a lieutenant, and had him transferred to an insignificant post of duty. A large number of efficient and trustworthy patrolmen were likewise removed, and their places were taken by less efficient and more or less untrustworthy men.

    The inevitable results of the Kipley policy were not slow in asserting themselves. The police service in the Thirty-second Precinct was disorganized and at once became all but valueless. Ever since the removal of Captain Larsen, crime has held high carnival in this part of the city. Peaceful citizens are robbed and slugged in front of their very doors by gangs of thugs who are, or at least ought to be, known to the police authorities. After ten o'clock at night partrolmen are conspicuous by their absence on some of the beats where thugs do a particularly flourishing business. But in the corner 3saloons of this district it is not difficult to discover uniformed guardians of the law, often three or four in one saloon, while the thugs operate in the streets.

    Citizens have complained of this reign of lawlessness and terror, but apparently to no avail. Now that a Senate Committee has turned its flashlight upon the conduct of the police department, the law-abiding people of the Thirty-second Precinct hope that some rays from the light may be cast in their direction. For the present at least, this is their only hope of relief from a scandalous state of affairs due to lack of proper police protection in consequence of the present management, or rather mismanagement, of the police department.

    Despite the mouthings and mumblings of certain newspapers and a lot of cheap politicians, the investigations of Kipley's "foinest" by Senator Berry's committee is of great interest to the people ...

    Norwegian
    I F 6
  • Revyen -- January 15, 1898
    [Dania Eliminates Initiation Fee] (Summary)

    The oldest Danish society in Chicago, Dania, now thirty-six years old, has recently declined somewhat. But at its last meeting it was resolved to cancel the initiation fee of four dollars after March 31. All you have to do to join the society is to bring a doctor's certificate that you are in good health, pay the membership dues for three months and the funeral assessment. It is expected that many new members will join our oldest and finest society, which also owns a very fine Danish library.

    The oldest Danish society in Chicago, Dania, now thirty-six years old, has recently declined somewhat. But at its last meeting it was resolved to cancel the initiation fee of four ...

    Danish
    III B 2, II B 2 a, II D 1
  • Revyen -- January 15, 1898
    [Dania Our Oldest Society]

    p. 4.- The oldest Danish society in Chicago, Dania, now 36 years old, has recently declined somewhat. But at its last meeting it was resolved from March 31st to cancel the initiation fee of $4. All you had to do to join the society was to bring a doctor's certificate that you were in good health, pay the membership dues for three months and the funeral assessment. It was expected that many new members would join our oldest and finest society, which also owns a very fine Danish library.

    p. 4.- The oldest Danish society in Chicago, Dania, now 36 years old, has recently declined somewhat. But at its last meeting it was resolved from March 31st to cancel ...

    Danish
    II D 1
  • Revyen -- January 15, 1898
    [Dania Our Oldest Society]

    p. 4.- The oldest Danish society in Chicago, Dania, now 36 years old, has recently declined somewhat. But at its last meeting it was resolved from March 31st to cancel the initiation fee of $4. All you had to do to join the society was to bring a doctor's certificate that you were in good health, pay the membership dues for three months and the funeral assessment. It was expected that many new members would join our oldest and finest society, which also owns a very fine Danish library.

    p. 4.- The oldest Danish society in Chicago, Dania, now 36 years old, has recently declined somewhat. But at its last meeting it was resolved from March 31st to cancel ...

    Danish
    II D 1
  • Revyen -- January 15, 1898
    [Erik Herskind]

    p. 4.- Erik Herskind died Jan. 9th, at about 50 years of age. He leaves a wife and no children. He has lived in Chicago for 25 years. He was with old Volquartz, the pioneer Scandinavian comedy, and played here. Mr. Herskind has appeared in numerous plays and was a man well liked and full of good humor. During the last six months he owned a saloon on Edgewood Avenue. He leaves many friends, old and young.

    (Summary)

    p. 4.- Erik Herskind died Jan. 9th, at about 50 years of age. He leaves a wife and no children. He has lived in Chicago for 25 years. He was ...

    Danish
    II B 1 c 1
  • Revyen -- January 15, 1898
    [Erik Herskind]

    p. 4.- Erik Herskind died Jan. 9th, at about 50 years of age. He leaves a wife and no children. He has lived in Chicago for 25 years. He was with old Volquartz, the pioneer Scandinavian comedy, and played here. Mr. Herskind has appeared in numerous plays and was a man well liked and full of good humor. During the last six months he owned a saloon on Edgewood Avenue. He leaves many friends, old and young.

    (Summary)

    p. 4.- Erik Herskind died Jan. 9th, at about 50 years of age. He leaves a wife and no children. He has lived in Chicago for 25 years. He was ...

    Danish
    II B 1 c 1
  • Skandinaven -- January 16, 1898
    Hypocrisy Unveiled (Editorial)

    Chairman Berry, of the Senate Investigating Committee, says that thus far the following facts have been established by his committee:

    "That Mayor Harrison, Civil Service Commissioners Kraus, Winston, and Washburne, Corporation Counsel Thornton, also Chief Kipley, have deliberately and intentionally violated the civil service law and have nullified its provisions.

    "That the suits in the courts, ostensibly to test the law, were instigated by Mayor Harrison with the intention of keeping his administration free from the law.

    "That 181 men are on the police pay rolls illegally.

    "That twenty-eight men are on the police eligible list illegally.

    2

    "That eight men became experienced patrolmen illegally.

    "That despite the provisions of the law to the contrary, the civil service law has been juggled to oust Republicans and to favor Democrats.

    "That the police pension fund is used mainly for the maintenance of able-bodied ex-policemen capable of performing duty.

    "That it would be advisable to amend the civil service law and to place the chief of police under its provisions.

    "That the present civil service commission should resign.

    "That sufficient evidence has been collected to warrant action on the part of the State's attorney and the grand jury against the city officials named."

    These are grave charges; but however severe it may appear to outsiders, the 3indictment is fully sustained by public opinion in Chicago, the assertions of a certain set of newspapers to the contrary notwithstanding.

    The evasions and violations of the civil service law during the present administration have been most flagrant and notorious, but some of our daily papers have been careful to conceal the facts from the people. Contemporaries, who generally have very little in common, have found cordial co-operation in this respect a matter of easy accomplishment. Some of them carry Republican colors, others appear to be controlled by an unbridled hostility to the Republican party of Illinois as organized at present, and still others masquerade as independent, I-am-holier-than-thou organs, while Democratic and violently anti-Republican at heart. But whatever may be the particular shades of their respective cloaks of hypocrisy, they sang as with one voice about the saintly glory of that redoubtable reformer Adolph Kraus and those lesser lights of reform, "his honor" and "his sub-honor," the chief of police.

    Whether the investigation conducted by Berry's committee, with commendable 4impartiality and thoroughness, will result in a lasting reform of present abuses remains to be seen. In any event, the unmasking of the whole contemptible business of hypocrisy is a great relief to the people of this city.

    This paper has always given the mayor credit for his frankness. He is not a civil service reformer and said so before his election. His policy has been in accordance with his pledges and utterances before election. When he made a clean sweep of the existing board and named three avowed spoilsmen as commissioners, he did only what had been expected--he put the oats into the keeping of the goats. Whether his administration and that of his chief of police involve punishable violations of the law, are questions for the State's attorney and the grand jury to decide. But he is not like Kraus and his colleagues, who are open to the charge of hypocrisy. Their shamming has disgusted all honest citizens, and all decent men and women are glad that Berry's committee has put a stop to the demoralizing business.

    Chairman Berry, of the Senate Investigating Committee, says that thus far the following facts have been established by his committee: "That Mayor Harrison, Civil Service Commissioners Kraus, Winston, and Washburne, ...

    Norwegian
    I F 6
  • Skandinaven -- January 17, 1898
    Begin at the Bottom

    One of the bad traits of our young people is the growing tendency to earn their living by their wits, and to leave manual labor to foreigners. Bodily work, except of the lightest kind, is getting more and more distasteful. The sons of our farmers, carpenters, and blacksmiths no sooner become their own masters then they stray off to the cities to engage in the "nobler" work of compounding prescriptions, soliciting insurance, or measuring calico.

    And yet, if the young man would but stop to think the matter over, he would find he could engage in manual labor at a far better recompense. The young man, in his ignorance, is not able to compete with the older and more experienced businessmen, and consequently the business sooner or later turns out a failure. Then his "air castles" have vanished, his fortune is gone, and he retires in disgust, having obtained neither wealth nor fame.

    On the other hand, if he had followed his father's pursuit, be it that of a farmer, a blacksmith, a carpenter, a mason, or a millwright, such an occupation would have developed his body and muscles, as well as his ability and 2 energy, which are necessary for success. His father would have proved to be an able teacher, giving him an education for his chosen profession as well as starting him in his pursuit at a trifling cost.

    Begin at the bottom of the ladder of success and work your way upward. Every child should be trained to be dextrous in one or another useful branch of productive industry. Not that he should necessarily follow that pursuit, but that he may have that one to fall back upon if driven from that of the more intellectual. If everyone would comply with this rule, we should have less business stagnation and fewer panics; our country would be prosperous and we would feel content, one and all. My friends, do not evade the harvest field. Kepp it up, and you will find manual labor no disgrace.

    One of the bad traits of our young people is the growing tendency to earn their living by their wits, and to leave manual labor to foreigners. Bodily work, except ...

    Norwegian
    I B 3 c, I B 3 b
  • Skandinaven -- January 17, 1898
    Our Duty as Citizens

    As time ebbs away, so ebbs away the life of man. As spring takes the place of winter by His bidding and by His prearrangement, so must youth take the place of the old by the same irresistible, dominating force. The boy of yesterday is the man of today. The spectacle in the arena, where life's great battle is fought, is ever changing, ever new. The struggle of yesterday is not the struggle of the morrow. The conquests of today will differ from the conquests of days to come. The obstacles encountered by the present generation will not confront the coming one. The character of the duties of man also change.

    The Scandinavian pioneers can look with pride upon their achievements. Youth, when taking charge of these great riches, may congratulate itself for descending from people marked, wherever their abode, for their honesty, industry, and self-reliance. The pioneers have fulfilled their life's mission. They have not only shaped and formed the history of several states and cities, but they have helped to shape and form the history of the nation. Where their work ends youth's work must begin. What they failed to achieve, we should strive 2to attain. The future of the republic rests with the young, as did that of the present with those gone before us. The work ahead is important; the duties which we are summoned to discharge are weighty. The Scandinavians occupy no mean place in the council of the nation. It lies entirely with the young, if, in the near future, they shall wield a still greater power. Along this line the Scandinavian race should be made in the future; but we must fight for our just share in the management of social and political affairs as a Americans, not as Scandinavians.

    In consequence of the large immigration to this country of so many different types of people, holding so many different ideas as to the forms of government, our institutions are in danger, while personal liberty needs watching and American principles need champions. An idea of the power of this foreign element in our politics can be had by looking back upon the results of the election held recently in New York City. It was not Americanism that elected Van Wyck. Fortunately, the Scandinavians do not belong to the ignorant class 3of immigrants, but it is their duty to assist in repressing and subduing this army of ignorant and reckless voters.

    Let us, therefore, be true citizens, true American citizens. We owe it to ourselves, to the country under whose protective care we are enjoying so many immunities, and to the land from whence we came; for we cannot honor the memory of our Fatherland more, than by proving ourselves loyal subjects of the nation which has so generously received us. Much as we love the mother tongue, it must necessarily take a secondary place among us. There should not be divided opinions as to what language the young, the coming generation should learn. No, we must not falter; we must not waver. Indecision is as bad as idleness. Let us educate ourselves, not for the mere purpose of being able to cope with our contemporaries in the battle for existence and individual comfort, but for higher and nobler aims. Let our motto be honesty, integrity and loyalty, and history shall attribute to us these very virtues.

    As time ebbs away, so ebbs away the life of man. As spring takes the place of winter by His bidding and by His prearrangement, so must youth take the ...

    Norwegian
    III A, III H, III G, I C
  • Narod Polski -- January 19, 1898
    Protest to Senator Lodge's bill: to the House of Representatives, Wash., D. C

    We, the undersigned, represent thousands of Polish people in America, belonging to churches, societies and political organizations to protest Sen. Lodge's bill on Immigration.

    Due to the merciless persecution of the Polish people in their native land, it is not strange that they should emigrate in such large numbers to the land of freedom; where they can enjoy the economical and political advantages, that are denied them in their native land.

    It is not fitting that Senator Lodge, in his bill claims that a great number of illiterates are found among the Polish people.

    The illiterates in this country soon take advantage of our system of education and self-interest, and take it upon themselves to learn to read and write English.

    2

    It is a convincing fact, if closely observed, that the Polish people are clean, orderly and law abiding citizens. At great expense they have established numerous schools, churches, libraries and places of recreation.

    They do not support any socialistic or anarchistic doctrines; and show the deepest respect for this country and its institutions.

    We have only a short time in which to prove that the figures quoted by Senator Lodge are far from being correct, about the Polish people.

    Mr. F. H. Jablonski, President of the Polish National Alliance of the United States of America, has received numerous letters from mayors, and police officials giving him their hearty support in the protest of Senator Lodges Immigration bill.

    We, the undersigned, represent thousands of Polish people in America, belonging to churches, societies and political organizations to protest Sen. Lodge's bill on Immigration. Due to the merciless persecution of ...

    Polish
    III G, III B 2, III B 1, I E, IV