The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Reform Advocate -- January 01, 1898
    (No headline)

    1,500 persons celebrated the opening of the Moses Montefiore Hebrew Free School at 169 W. 12th Place, Sunday night. It is for the instruction of children in Hebrew and the Jewish religion.

    1,500 persons celebrated the opening of the Moses Montefiore Hebrew Free School at 169 W. 12th Place, Sunday night. It is for the instruction of children in Hebrew and the ...

    Jewish
    I A 2 a
  • L'italia -- January 02, 1898
    Lecture

    We want to announce that Mr. A.A. Nobile will give a lecture on the subject, "Our Country and Religion", January 16, 1898, at 8 PM, at Gazzolo Hall, on 1003 W. Madison Street. He will lecture in English, Italian, and French. Admission tickets are only $25. Everyone is invited to attend.

    We want to announce that Mr. A.A. Nobile will give a lecture on the subject, "Our Country and Religion", January 16, 1898, at 8 PM, at Gazzolo Hall, on 1003 ...

    Italian
    II B 2 g, III H, III C
  • L'italia -- January 02, 1898
    Gambling Aldermen

    The Grand Jury has placed three aldermen under arrest, because they were owners of billiard-parlors, where games forbidden by law are played. The accusers were the Democratic municipal counselors: Alderman John Powers, Alderman William J. O'Brien, and Alderman Michael Kenna.

    Detective Martini was also put under arrest for taking an oath that no such games existed in the City of Chicago.

    The Grand Jury has placed three aldermen under arrest, because they were owners of billiard-parlors, where games forbidden by law are played. The accusers were the Democratic municipal counselors: Alderman ...

    Italian
    I F 6
  • Abendpost -- January 03, 1898
    For a Good Cause.

    The preparations for the fourth German-American Benefit Ball are progressing nicely under the leadership of its committees. Although the above Association has only been in existence for three years, it nevertheless succeeded during that time, in distributing $27,000.00 for the aid of Chicago Benevolent Institutions. Last winter, when the Mayor issued a proclamation for the amelioration of suffering, the Association was among the first to respond to the call and two days after the request it has $1500.00 available which it distributed as follows: United Bureau of Charities, $500.00; Chicago Relief and Aid Society, $500.00; German Relief and Aid Society $500.00; The net proceeds of the Benefit Ball, which was given on the 21st of January, 1897, were $10,450.00.

    After deducting the above amount, a balance of $8950.00 remained, which was allotted to "The German Old Age Home, Alexian Hospital, German Hospital, St. Elizabeth's Hospital, Michael Reese Hospital, Lying In Dispensary, Bureau of Justice, Association "Recreation" (German) Home for Destitute and Crippled Children, Uhlich's Orphanage." 2The Association decided to distribute souvenirs again, to all who will visit their Ball.

    The preparations for the fourth German-American Benefit Ball are progressing nicely under the leadership of its committees. Although the above Association has only been in existence for three years, it ...

    German
    II D 10, III B 2
  • Narod Polski -- January 05, 1898
    Polish Immigration Home

    Polish people wishing to purchase passports to travel to Poland, or from Poland to America, can receive all proper information, dates and time schedules from the Mother Superior of the Felician Sisters,

    3 Morris Street, New York City, N. Y.

    This Immigration Home also takes care of Polish People who are old and are not in the position to take care of themselves financially; therefore, the Felician Sisters ask that people wishing to travel will, please, join as members at the monthly rate of $2.00; this money is to be used solely for the upkeep and sole support of the aged.

    The officers in charge of this Polish organization are:-

    Father Stanley Szymanowski President
    Father B. Gramlewicz Vice President
    Father Dr. J. Dworzak Sec'y. of Finance
    Father Stanley Nowak Recording Secretary
    Father Dr. Dworzah Chaplain
    2

    All money orders and checks should be sent to the "Polish Immigration Home," care of Dr. J. Dworzak, Williamsbridge, New York.

    Polish people wishing to purchase passports to travel to Poland, or from Poland to America, can receive all proper information, dates and time schedules from the Mother Superior of the ...

    Polish
    III G, II D 6, II D 5
  • Narod Polski -- January 05, 1898
    [Theatrical News]

    On Sunday January 16, the St. Stanislaus Dramatic Club, will hold an amateur showing of the drama, "Monte Christo."

    Through the courtesy of the copywright owners, Mr. Szcezesny Zahajkiewicz translated the drama to Polish, for the benefit of the Polish members of the parish.

    The proceeds of this show will be used for the completion of the dome on the newly built church, St. Stanislaus Kostka.

    On Sunday January 16, the St. Stanislaus Dramatic Club, will hold an amateur showing of the drama, "Monte Christo." Through the courtesy of the copywright owners, Mr. Szcezesny Zahajkiewicz translated ...

    Polish
    II B 1 c 1, IV, III C
  • Lietuva -- January 07, 1898
    The Lithuanian Farms in Arkansas

    The number of farmers increased in Arkansas, but the Lithuanian farmers are fast running away from here. Their farms are bought by strangers. Many Lithuanians sold their farms to the people of other nationalities. The majority of our Lithuanians who started here to farm were not farmers, they did not know how to farm, the task was too hard for them. Only a few Lithuanians are staying here on their farms, because they know how to work them.

    Those Lithuanians who had been farmers in Lithuania succeeded as farmers here. The Lithuanian farm colony was ruined here by tailors who had never been farmers before, and they did not know how to work the farm land.

    Farmer.

    The number of farmers increased in Arkansas, but the Lithuanian farmers are fast running away from here. Their farms are bought by strangers. Many Lithuanians sold their farms to the ...

    Lithuanian
    I L, I C
  • Svornost -- January 12, 1898
    Proclamation to All Bohemians Living in Chicago and in the State of Illinois.

    The appointed representatives of the Bohemian people in our native land have issued a truly touching request to all Bohemian people, to all hearts who, thus far, for the sacred cause of our nationals have so dreadfully been tried, to give up all charitable collections of various associations and unite and offer all their talents, otherwise devoted to national purpose only, for the benefit of the Central Liberal School and the two national unions in Bohemia, which have found themselves suddenly in a most violent conflict with the age-old destroyers of Bohemian people, namely, the Germans and their unnatural allies, the Bohemian renegades. In this wild struggle which has broken out, and whose unfavorable results could easily be ill-fated to the life of the entire Bohemian people, all the moral and material assistance of our entire nation is needed. We believe that the American-Bohemians will not neglect their national duty, because their love for their beautiful Bohemian land will again flare up within them. They will give with enthusiasm, according to their means.

    For this reason, we are calling a general meeting for Friday, January 14, at 28 P.M., in order to undertake a definite organization so that we may start activity.

    The manner in which we intend to carry out this general collection will be announced shortly and we hope that it will meet with approval.

    The appointed representatives of the Bohemian people in our native land have issued a truly touching request to all Bohemian people, to all hearts who, thus far, for the sacred ...

    Bohemian
    III H, II D 10
  • Reform Advocate -- January 14, 1898
    [Home for the Aged]

    The 8th annual meeting of the Home for Aged Jews was held last Sunday. The following information was contained in the report of the board of directors, as presented by the secretary, Rabbi Joseph Stolz.

    Since last May, seven applicants were admitted. The total number of inmates is now 64. The report of the financial secretary showed the income from membership dues as $7,000 and from interest, $4,300. There was a deficit of $995. $2,500 had been added to the Endowment Fund, which now amounts to $77,600.

    The 8th annual meeting of the Home for Aged Jews was held last Sunday. The following information was contained in the report of the board of directors, as presented by ...

    Jewish
    II D 5
  • Skandinaven -- January 14, 1898
    A Flashlight Needed (Editorial)

    Despite the mouthings and mumblings of certain newspapers and a lot of cheap politicians, the investigations of Kipley's "foinest" by Senator Berry's committee is of great interest to the people of Chicago. The evil effects of the disorganization of the force since Mr. Kipley assumed control of the department have been felt in all parts of the city, but probably nowhere to such an extent as by the 100,000 people residing within the Thirty-second Police Precinct. During the administration of Captain Larsen, of the West Chicago Avenue Station, the police service of the Thirty-second Precinct attained a very high degree of efficiency. He was one of the very best captains of the force; he knew his men and had them well in hand. He also knew the thugs and crooks and had them well under control.

    2

    All this, Mr. Kipley knew as well as anyone else. He knew that the service of the West Chicago Avenue Station could not be improved, and that the best he could do would be to let well enough alone. And yet he proceeded to reduce Captain Larsen to the rank of a lieutenant, and had him transferred to an insignificant post of duty. A large number of efficient and trustworthy patrolmen were likewise removed, and their places were taken by less efficient and more or less untrustworthy men.

    The inevitable results of the Kipley policy were not slow in asserting themselves. The police service in the Thirty-second Precinct was disorganized and at once became all but valueless. Ever since the removal of Captain Larsen, crime has held high carnival in this part of the city. Peaceful citizens are robbed and slugged in front of their very doors by gangs of thugs who are, or at least ought to be, known to the police authorities. After ten o'clock at night partrolmen are conspicuous by their absence on some of the beats where thugs do a particularly flourishing business. But in the corner 3saloons of this district it is not difficult to discover uniformed guardians of the law, often three or four in one saloon, while the thugs operate in the streets.

    Citizens have complained of this reign of lawlessness and terror, but apparently to no avail. Now that a Senate Committee has turned its flashlight upon the conduct of the police department, the law-abiding people of the Thirty-second Precinct hope that some rays from the light may be cast in their direction. For the present at least, this is their only hope of relief from a scandalous state of affairs due to lack of proper police protection in consequence of the present management, or rather mismanagement, of the police department.

    Despite the mouthings and mumblings of certain newspapers and a lot of cheap politicians, the investigations of Kipley's "foinest" by Senator Berry's committee is of great interest to the people ...

    Norwegian
    I F 6