The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Skandinaven -- January 01, 1893
    [Athletic Club to Hold Meet]

    The Danish Athletic Club Danevirkes Marked will have its big nine-day meet from January 6 to January 15. Everyone should come to Danevirkes meet; it will be the greatest treat you ever had. The program is an excellent one. We cannot describe it in full. If you come you will think you are back in Copenhagen in the Pleasure Grove of the Danish Parks. Vaudeville, merry-go-rounds, Danish restaurants, imported Danish beer, etc., will be found there.

    The Danish Athletic Club Danevirkes Marked will have its big nine-day meet from January 6 to January 15. Everyone should come to Danevirkes meet; it will be the greatest treat ...

    Danish
    II B 3, III B 2, II B 1 c 3
  • Skandinaven -- January 01, 1893
    [Athletic Club to Hold Meet]

    The Danish Athletic Club Danevirkes Marked will have its big nine-day meet from January 6 to January 15. Everyone should come to Danevirkes meet; it will be the greatest treat you ever had. The program is an excellent one. We cannot describe it in full. If you come you will think you are back in Copenhagen in the Pleasure Grove of the Danish Parks. Vaudeville, merry-go-rounds, Danish restaurants, imported Danish beer, etc., will be found there.

    The Danish Athletic Club Danevirkes Marked will have its big nine-day meet from January 6 to January 15. Everyone should come to Danevirkes meet; it will be the greatest treat ...

    Danish
    II B 3, III B 2, II B 1 c 3
  • Chicago Tribune -- January 03, 1893
    Scandinavians Gathering a Library

    The Scandinavian Literary Society of Chicago is a newly incorporated club which has just opened quarters in the Schiller Bldg.

    While the main purpose will be the accumulation of a library of rare Scandinavian books and the cultivation of national literature and lore, it will have the distinctive features of a social and exclusive club.

    It already has about one-hundred members, including the leading and wealthiest representatives of the race in the city. It's spacious rooms are in the Schiller Building and are handsomely outfitted. A. E. Roewas, who won The Tribune competitive prize for municipal colors, is the libraries, and he says that in order to give this library a standing among Chicago libraries it has been decided to direct special attention to collecting such works from the 2rich Scandinavian literature, both in print and manuscript, as are not to be found in the present public libraries. Special attention will also be paid to the securing of works of Scandinavian authors in other languages and the works of foreign authors pertaining to Scandinavian history and culture. In connection with the library there will be a reading-room to be furnished with magazines and newspapers. The officers of the society, which also constitute a Board of Directors, are: Axel J. Wessman, President; Anton M. Kolderup, First Vice-Press; John Rasmussen, Second Vice-Pres; Alfred C. Garde, Recording Sec'y; Gustav Siostrom, Cor. Sec'y; S. J. Christensen, Treasurer; A. J. Roewad, Librarian. The seal of the club is the municipal design with the monogram S.L.S., the whole surmounted by a phoenix. As Scandinavia historically, as well as in literature and language, comprise the Kingdoms of Sweden, Norway and Denmark; the officers are about equally selected from the three countries. The President this year is a Swede, the First Vice-President a Norwegian, and the second a Dane.

    The Scandinavian Literary Society of Chicago is a newly incorporated club which has just opened quarters in the Schiller Bldg. While the main purpose will be the accumulation of a ...

    Norwegian
    II B 1 d, I C, II B 2 a
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 04, 1893
    Altgeld Ill. Office Seekers Too Much for Him

    Governor Altgeld is confined to bed, at the Palmer House. His illness is not exactly grave, but is likely to interfere with his departure to Springfield What a six months campaign, the antagonistic attacks of the opposing party, and the strenuous efforts which were hardly equalled by any other candidate, could not accomplish, that has been done by the horde of office-seekers which for weeks had "parked" on Altgeld's neck. Yesterday he broke down.

    Governor Altgeld is confined to bed, at the Palmer House. His illness is not exactly grave, but is likely to interfere with his departure to Springfield What a six months ...

    German
    IV, I F 5
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 04, 1893
    Senior Prof. Hermann Von Holst.

    Prof. Holst, whose scientific achievements and personal history are well known to our readers through previous articles in this publication, gave a public lecture at the Central Music Hall. It was his first appearance, held in connection with the Chicago University's celebration.

    The famous German author of historical works, notably the American History of Democracy, spoke about the necessity for a "real university in this country" and proved himself to be an excellent English speaker. With a sympathetic, and exceedingly sonorous voice he expressed his opinions in an animated, compelling manner; he showed manly independence and conviction. He is not blind to the present woeful insufficiencies of our American institutions of higher learning, as well as the general educational system. He was absolutely fearless in his exposures of these short-comings.

    2

    We gave a synopsis of his address yesterday, in our local column but the main issue deserves to be emphasized on our Editorial page. Prof. Von Holst does not deny his intense admiration for the tremendous development of the American people and its popular form of Government, an insight derived from a twenty-five year analytical study, neither is he silent about the great problems which this nation must solve - no annihilating wars like the fight for Independence or the Rebellion, but the solution of eventual colossal inner difficulties. He considers these to bet the unprecedented increase in population, and the chase for huge wealth. He feels convinced, that if a free government is to endure, then a large part of the masses must be placed on a higher plane, both mentally and morally, all in all, a more ideal public spirit is a national necessity.

    3

    Human nature amongst American men and women - according to Holst - is identical with the characteristics of other nations and therefore dominated by the same eternal, moral principles; history will not make exceptions in their favor. The inference is, that the rapid materialistic improvements are no definite safeguards for the future of the United States; on the contrary, it must lead to a gradual disintegration, if we cannot add a measure of loftier sentiments and elevating emotions to it.

    From this confusing medley of ever improving materialistic accomplishments, grow a variety of increasing difficulties and in order to solve them, it is paramount that we first raise the mental and moral life of the people into a lofty realm.

    4

    Even today, we have no university in the United States which conforms to the European definition of that word. All American schools, under the name "University," are either a combination of a "College" and "University," where the university forms an appendage or becomes the outgrowth of the lower classes; or it is a cross between a college and university. We find a university which conforms to the fundamentals, an entirely separate hall of learning, independent of college work, a true university organically comprising all the four faculties, is non-existent in the United States at present.

    Through observations in varuous countries he noted that on the average, the American student does not compare in knowledge with others but in his earnest, persistent and enthusiastic guest for wisdom, he is indeed the 5highest type, and nature, in fashioning the convolutions of his brain has not shown any parsimonious tendencies. Give the American student adequate opportunities and he will be on a par with the scientists of the cultured European countries. But at present we have neglected him in a most abominable manner.

    The best method to realize a higher cultural level for the masses, consists in doing everything possible, so that an ever growing minority is enabled to reach higher mental and moral standards. This makes universities of the first rank an increasingly necessary adjunct for the maintenance, growth and vitality of the American Democracy.

    6

    The university must not only teach, in conformity to college procedure, it must demonstrate how the treasure of knowledge may be increased by the individual, by his own independent effort. That teacher and student is indeed puerile - at best suitable only as an intellectual hireling - whose studies do not create an all-consuming, encompassing zeal to ennoble and illume his earthly existence. These lofty aims can only be realized if we apply the true and fundamental principles of university teaching. No drilling, no training, but education by direction which tends to create independence not only in the diverse branches, but above all in thinking. To become dry as dust" professors by infiltrated knowledge....to be experts only on specific subjects does not suffice....we must be citizens of such character....that it is felt in palace and log house......A large, erudite and also critical assembly accepted his diction with great applause.

    Prof. Holst, whose scientific achievements and personal history are well known to our readers through previous articles in this publication, gave a public lecture at the Central Music Hall. It ...

    German
    II B 2 g, I A 1 a
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 04, 1893
    The Increasing Number of Suicides A Self-Murderer is a Coward; Suicide is a Mortal Sin (Editorial)

    The unfortunate mania of suicide, from which even our small community is not free, has grown in recent times to alarming proportions. It is unusual to pick up a newspaper without finding within its pages reports of suicides.

    According to the calculations of the English statistician, William Matthews, the number of suicides in the world amounts to 180,000 per year and with every year, this number increases.

    In this craze for suicide, Saxony leads the rest of Europe with an average of 400 suicides per million inhabitants. In the past year in Berlin, 370 people committed suicide, while 155 attempted suicides were reported.

    2

    Statistics show that in the last decade--1880 to 1890--the number of suicides in Europe has increased by seventy-five per cent over the decade preceding it. The same conditions exist in America. Here suicides in the large cities are even more frequent than in Europe.

    The growth of suicides even among children is alarming. In less than a year's time, sixty-two child suicides occurred in Berlin; of these, forty-six were boys and sixteen were girls; twenty-four of the children were fifteen years old, fourteen were fourteen, nine were thirteen, seven were twelve, and one was not yet seven years of age!

    In high schools, the principle cause seems to be fear of examinations, in lower schools, fear of punishment. Other causes cited were: frustrated ambition (!), unsuccessful love affairs (!!), arrogance, anger, indignation, physical suffering, etc.

    In all cases, the main fault is undoubtedly a lack of the proper religious 3and moral background; at the same time, a lack of the realization that suicide, in full possession of one's sanity, is a crime against God, a crime against one's self and family, one's church and country.

    The common misguided belief that there is anything heroic in a suicidal act must be destroyed. When, during the war in Egypt, suicides began to increase in the French army, Napoleon issued the decree that every self-murderer would be branded a deserter and a coward.

    Religion is the strongest defense against the temptations of suicide. A true Christian endures with fortitude every hardship and misfortune that befalls him; in those years when the Christian faith blossomed, suicides were unknown, or at least were very rare.

    The unfortunate mania of suicide, from which even our small community is not free, has grown in recent times to alarming proportions. It is unusual to pick up a newspaper ...

    Polish
    I B 4
  • Abendpost -- January 05, 1893
    School Affairs.

    On account of a lengthly, lively agitation there will begin on next Monday, the teaching of the German language in the Public schools. So far, the School Board had form letters printed, which had to be mailed by the Principals to the parents of the pupils, but the Principals, who as a rule oppose the teaching of German, failed to do so, and threw the circulars away. According to a change in the rules, decided upon by the Schoolboard, the Principals are compelled to distribute the circulars among the children.

    75 of these applications are sufficient, to introduce the teaching of German in any school, and it is so easy to obtain this figure that there can be no doubt, but that by next Monday, with the exception of a few branch schools, all the public schools in Chicago will start teaching German.

    On account of a lengthly, lively agitation there will begin on next Monday, the teaching of the German language in the Public schools. So far, the School Board had form ...

    German
    I A 1 b
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 05, 1893
    The Emigration Review on American Poles (Editorial)

    In its last few editions, the Emigration Review has published a detailed report .... of the travels of Doctor Dunikowski in America, ending in its last number with the following remarks which are of great interest to us:

    ".... Professor Dunikowski's journey proved that there is actually an impressive number of Poles in North America, and that these countrymen of ours, living together in large groups, have every chance of retaining their original nationality forever. There are a million and a half, or perhaps by this time, two million people who are free, well-to-do, and are already somewhat enlightened through their own Polish schools in the practice of American life. But these people will not easily permit themselves to be divested of their Polish nationality even by the Americans.

    "In many sections, a third generation of Poles is already rising. They 2are well-built physically, handsome, and of a lively temperament as a result of better physical and spiritual nourishment than the old country could have afforded them. These people, who constituted a burden to their homeland, or possibly would have increased the death rate after a short and miserable life, are attaining a decent position in America.

    "With us in Poland, they occupied the lowest intellectual level; in America they are changing beyond recognition; they are becoming intelligent and useful citizens. They learn to read and write the Polish language in Polish schools built at their own expense. Although it is true that these schools have their faults, they have one invaluable point in their favor--they exist and keep alive the national spirit.

    "Practically all of these people have acquired a deep love for their mother country and are doing their utmost to retain the Polish language and the Catholic faith; economic well-being and hope promote rapid germination of 3these spiritual needs.

    "There are in the United States, whole sections with a majority of seventy to eighty per cent of people who are truly Polish, as for instance, northern Wisconsin, and certain parts of northern Michigan. In sections of Chicago, as in Stanislawow, Wojciechow, [St. Stanislaus', St. Adalbert's] there are 100,000 Polish people; Buffalo ...., Detroit, New York, and Brooklyn have 40,000 each; Cleveland, (neighborhoods of Krakow, Poznan), has 25,000, not counting the smaller sections.

    "There seem to be enough of our people abroad then, to awaken us from the apathy with which we have looked upon emigration. We should interest ourselves in, and not underrate these Polish masses overseas, who in any case may give valuable contribution to our national cause.

    "In the first place, our newspapers should take a different attitude toward this problem than has been true heretofore, for their attitude has been essentially humorous. Interest in the Poles abroad will require no material 4sacrifices, for our countrymen are fairly prosperous; at most, we might be expected to supply their public libraries with Polish books. Authors and publishers who would donate books might even expect profit, for the workers there buy the books that they like. One edition, printed in Posen and sold in America, brought its publishers a fortune."

    The interesting Emigration Review closes the report with an enumeration of the greatest needs of the Poles in America, and with a promise that it will return again and again to the affairs of the "fourth partition," as they call us.

    In its last few editions, the Emigration Review has published a detailed report .... of the travels of Doctor Dunikowski in America, ending in its last number with the following ...

    Polish
    I C, III H, III G, III A, I B 4, I A 2 a, II B 2 d 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 05, 1893
    German Instruction.

    Regardless of the recently renewed attacks of the "nativistic" press, the popular demand for German instruction mounts steadily and, commencing from next Monday, it will be taught in all the public schools of the city, with the exception of a few small branch schools. A few years ago, German was taught in 146 schools, by 220 teachers while 40 schools in the annexed districts did not list it in their curriculum. Through the efforts of the German school board member, E. G. Halle, new rules were adopted which made it possible for children to include this subject in their studies, if they desired it, since these schools are now under the jurisdiction of the new regulations. Already in September, 30 additonal schools taught German and next Monday another 13 will offer this course. This means, that in all of the city's 189 schools, the German language will now be taught by 265 teachers, and that 40,000 scholars will avail themselves of this opportunity. The year of the World's Fair also marks the realization of aspirations for the friends of the German tongue. Since German is now a regular subject in all schools, no particular difficulty will be experienced in providing it, whenever new schools are being built. The German Committee of the school board, and Dr. G. A. Zimmermann, supervisor of German instruction, deserve congratulations for their success. May they also be able 2to assure its continuance and to defend it against the attacks of its adversaries in the future.

    Regardless of the recently renewed attacks of the "nativistic" press, the popular demand for German instruction mounts steadily and, commencing from next Monday, it will be taught in all the ...

    German
    I A 1 b, I C, III A, I F 4
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 05, 1893
    Polish National Building and Loan Association (Announcement)

    The Polish National Building and Loan Association opens its twentieth series on Friday, January 6, 1893. The fifth year of the Association's existence already shows great profits for its stockholders. We publish a quarterly statement of account so that everyone can see the steady progress of the Association, and the businesslike manner in which the books are managed. Weekly payments are twelve and one-half cents per share. We loan money on real estate at six per cent and a small weekly premium.....

    The Polish National Building and Loan Association opens its twentieth series on Friday, January 6, 1893. The fifth year of the Association's existence already shows great profits for its stockholders. ...

    Polish
    II A 2