The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Chicago Tribune -- January 04, 1891
    (No headline)

    The opposition is represented by the Rev. John Beucher, who is the Esher appointee so the pulpit, but who can not get possession, ex-Trustee Ritter, George Schneider, Caspar, Lietz and John Oesch.

    They allege all manner of bad things against Fusch, in addition to saying that he is not the legally appointed minister, but simply the representative of the "Kickers" who refuse to recognize Esher.

    It is alleged that Fuschs and his adherents have secretly connived to get the church into debt and have refused to allow the complainants to help support it. All this is done, it is said, in order that the church may begotten into debt and thereby severed from the Evangelical Alliance. In addition to the charge of conspiring against Trustee Ritter, it is claimed the Reverend John Beuscher alone has the right to occupy the pulpit and in order to ask for Fusch disposition.

    Judge Horton issued the injunction that will preserve Ritter's rights, but declined at present to go so far as to depose the Rev. Mr. Fusch.

    The opposition is represented by the Rev. John Beucher, who is the Esher appointee so the pulpit, but who can not get possession, ex-Trustee Ritter, George Schneider, Caspar, Lietz and ...

    German
    III C
  • Abendpost -- January 05, 1891
    [Concert of the Oratorium Lodge]

    On Saturday, January 17th the first concert of the Oratorium Lodge will take place under the direction of Mr. Gabriel Katzenburger.

    The Concert will be of interest in so much as the famous artist Mr. Ovide Musin himself will be heard. Mr. Musin is a well known violinist.

    Miss Louise Tanner and Miss Inez Parmaler are prominent sopranos and Karl Horn as a well known baritone. Mr. Ed Schaef is an outstanding pianist.

    The Concert is expected to be the outstanding one of the season.

    On Saturday, January 17th the first concert of the Oratorium Lodge will take place under the direction of Mr. Gabriel Katzenburger. The Concert will be of interest in so much ...

    German
    II B 1 a, II A 3 b
  • Abendpost -- January 05, 1891
    Schlesier [Silesian] Watch

    On Wednesday, January 7th, the Schlesier Health Benefit Lodge will hold its halfyear general gathering. All those who are willing to become members can apply to the Staats Zeitung Exchange.

    Inquire at half past 8 A.M., January 7th.

    A. Gotzmann, Sec.

    On Wednesday, January 7th, the Schlesier Health Benefit Lodge will hold its halfyear general gathering. All those who are willing to become members can apply to the Staats Zeitung Exchange. ...

    German
    II D 1, V A 1, III B 2
  • Abendpost -- January 05, 1891
    German Press Club

    Tomorrow evening a meeting of interest will take place in the Club-rooms of the Press Club; of interest because the famous lecturer, Mr. Arthur Koebner, has prepared a fine program. Part of his talk will be in Low German and part in High German.

    No doubt the criticism and discussions following the recital will be most interesting. Prior to the lecture, a business meeting will take place and many important subjects will be discussed. Thus the meeting as a whole should be of interest to every club member.

    Tomorrow evening a meeting of interest will take place in the Club-rooms of the Press Club; of interest because the famous lecturer, Mr. Arthur Koebner, has prepared a fine program. ...

    German
    II B 2 g, III A, III B 2, II B 1 d
  • Abendpost -- January 05, 1891
    [German Waiter's Union]

    The Old German Waiter Lodge, held their general meeting yesterday, at the same time an officers' election took place at 133 N. Clark Street.

    The wealth of the Union at the present time is $1545.90. This money is entrusted to the well known owner, W. H. Jung, 106 Randolph Street.

    To sick members the Union paid last year $275. Considering that the Union has only a member ship of fifty-five members it was felt that the Union was progressive as well as successful in its activities.

    The officers election gave the following results: Pres. Henry Ulrich; Vice Pres. W. H. Jung; Treasurer Robert Biegel; Fin. Sec. Fritz Heuber; Rec. Sec. Fritz Boehm; Finance Committee Aug. Muessingbroodt, Will Suhr and George Rowe.

    The Old German Waiter Lodge, held their general meeting yesterday, at the same time an officers' election took place at 133 N. Clark Street. The wealth of the Union at ...

    German
    I D 2 a 2
  • Skandinaven -- January 05, 1891
    Building in 1890

    More than four thousand buildings were erected in 1890. The majority were built in the Scandinavian district on the North-West Side.

    More than four thousand buildings were erected in 1890. The majority were built in the Scandinavian district on the North-West Side.

    Norwegian
    II F
  • Abendpost -- January 05, 1891
    [German Company]

    The Directors of the German Company held their regular monthly meeting yesterday. From the report of the manager, Mr. Wm. Thielepope, we understand that during the entire month of December, only sixty-four families, with one hundred fifty-eight children, as well as fifteen unmarried people, received relief to the amount of $326.56. One hundred thirty-eight people received work.

    The following men joined as members: S. Frendenburg, Robert E. Bluthardt, Henry W. Lehmann, Gustave Frukler, I. W. Kraft and Huttonlocher.

    The Directors of the German Company held their regular monthly meeting yesterday. From the report of the manager, Mr. Wm. Thielepope, we understand that during the entire month of December, ...

    German
    II D 10, II D 8
  • Abendpost -- January 05, 1891
    [Waverly Socialists]

    At yesterday's meeting of the Socialists at the Waverly Hall, Comrade Cahan spoke on Darwin and Socialism. Mr. Cahan expressed himself by saying that Mr. Darwin was a Socialist; not only that, but was unaware of it himself.

    Speaking for almost an hour, he criticized the Social Political System. Next Sunday will be an open forum discussion of Socialists at the Vorwaerts Turnhall.

    At yesterday's meeting of the Socialists at the Waverly Hall, Comrade Cahan spoke on Darwin and Socialism. Mr. Cahan expressed himself by saying that Mr. Darwin was a Socialist; not ...

    German
    I E, II B 2 g
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 06, 1891
    The Press Criticizes the United States Government for Mistreatment of the American Indians (Editorial)

    The United States Government has been criticized very severely by the European and American press for its mistreatment of the American Indians. There are indications that Uncle Sam has discredited himself by his inglorious war with the Indians. Did Uncle Sam, in reality, cunningly bait the Indians into war so as to get rid of his red-skinned children, as is maintained by malicious persons? No! Fortunately, it is not as bad as that. The United States Government has not committed infamous acts, but there is no doubt that it lost its respect on account of the lack of tact displayed by government agents at the Indian reservation camps.

    It does not make much difference to the Indians whether the government of the pale faces has disgraced itself or merely lost its respect. The result is the same. It plunged them into despair. When they took up their weapons, after being provoked and because they did not want to submit themselves to mistreatment and unmerciful beatings, the pale faces began to kill the old masters of this land, the rightful owners of these territories.

    2

    It may be said, however, that the United States is guilty of not watching the fingers of the government agents at the Indian reservation camps, and these fingers were, indeed, very long. They grabbed whatever was possible at every opportunity, and regardless of means. These agents were appointed for only four years; honce, they tried to make it as profitable as possible and, as the control was not strict, they speculated with supplies and rations entrusted to them. This was done is such a way that it was a source of good income at the expense of the Indians. The Indians were driven not only to despair, but almost to madness, and on account of this, a war against the Indians was fought which blackened the good reputation of the United States.

    In this particular instance the deficiency of our institutions is manifested more clearly than in thousands of other cases to which, because of being so common and familiar to us every day, we do not pay any attention.

    There will be no order as long as our public offices (which ought to be filled by men of not only unquestionable integrity but of great ability and long experience) are filled by men who have nothing behind them but a political career.

    3

    All public offices, especially the higher ones, should be entrusted to persons with the proper qualifications, who have passed an examination, and who have a good record. This is practiced not only in all civilized countries, but also in those which are considered uncivilized, as China.

    No one has a right to maintain that it is impossible to establish order in a republic where the highest offices, that is, those of the President and the Cabinet members, must be changed every four years. Where there exists a civil service system, there exists a good foundation which, with good will, can be further developed and gradually adopted everywhere.

    This is the time for establishing order in the Republic of the republics, which is proud of having model institutions. It would save the United States many losses and many humiliations. Much water will have to flow down the rivers before this will be accomplished. In the meantime, the redskins may be entirely exterminated. Today's telegraphic dispatches brought news of stubborn fighting with the Indians, and rumors are being spread that General Mills has been killed. It would be a great pity to lose this man, who would rather appease the Indians, without bloodshed and who might have been able to save the honor of the country.

    The United States Government has been criticized very severely by the European and American press for its mistreatment of the American Indians. There are indications that Uncle Sam has discredited ...

    Polish
    I G
  • Chicago Tribune -- January 06, 1891
    No Official Recognition

    It has been suggested that the German-American societies in Chicago should unite and form an organization of German-American citizens for the promotion of the Fair in Germany as the former residents of different States who now reside in Chicago have done in this country. Washington Hesing of the Staats-Zeitung doesn't think such an organization of the German-American societies would accomplish any good.

    "I don't think the German-American societies could be organized for such purpose," he said yesterday. "There isn't a very strong affinity between those societies here. I can see how the various State associations did some good for Chicago before the city was selected as a site for the Fair, as many of them had friends among the members of Congress whose votes could be influenced. It would be far different, however, in trying to accomplish anything with Germany. From all the information I can gather from my correspondence and talks with the travelers who come from there, the German Government will take no official recognition of the Fair. The Government in so disgusted with the McKinley Bill that it is not worth while to talk about it doing anything.

    2

    That is the situation now, of course. It is a long time until the Fair, and the feeling may change.

    "As to the German-American societies of Chicago having any influence in shaping the action of the Government it is idle to talk about it."

    It has been suggested that the German-American societies in Chicago should unite and form an organization of German-American citizens for the promotion of the Fair in Germany as the former ...

    German
    III H