The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 01, 1890
    [The Loeb and Brothers Bank]

    A. Loeb & Bros. Messrs. Adolph and William Loeb conduct a very profitable banking business, exchange and depository, besides they have been very successful in property speculation. It certainly requires exceptional capacity and business tact to give proper attention to all these branches; but this firm knew how to solve its problems, since the success in all its departments has been most surprising, so much so in fact, that the new year justifies great aspirations.

    Few firms invested their money as securely in properties as these gentlemen have done. The constant increase in land values will bring them ample rewards for their investments. The company's standing is the surest guarantee for those who deal with them, that all agreements will be conplied with promptly and to the satisfaction of the customer. It is very gratifying that the Germans of this city are so well represented by such well known and respected business men as the Messrs. Loeb, who give the best evidence as to the persistent diligence and constant progress of the German immigrants.

    A. Loeb & Bros. Messrs. Adolph and William Loeb conduct a very profitable banking business, exchange and depository, besides they have been very successful in property speculation. It certainly requires ...

    German
    II A 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 01, 1890
    Banking and Commerce. John Buehler and Co.

    What Chicago German does not know the name of John Buehler Sr., the founder of this firm in which he has been the ruling spirit for more than a quarter of a century, a man who has shown his ability in public offices, and in private enterprise. He represents a solid banking business as well as a successful real estate company. His speculations brought him a large share of the profits, which were derived from the rapid rise of land values of the city. During the last years Mr. Buehler has obtained additional assistance from two capable and energetic gentlemen, his son, J. W. Buehler, and his son-in-law, Otto Peuser. The end of the recent fiscal year shows excellent results, proof of the effectiveness of the new combination. It is quite superfluous to relate, that the business rests on a solid foundation, that it is protected against the storms of adversity, since it has repeatedly withstood the crucial test. In banking circles hard times have been experienced, reliable firms perished, others were partially shipwrecked, so that the crisis left its noticeable imprint even up to the present day. But Mr. Buehler's establishment knew no "retrogression", every year its boundary was enlarged and under its present able leadership, the new firm faces a still greater future. We mentioned that Mr. Buehler's

    2

    activities are not restricted to banking only, that he is interested also in large land speculations. Aside from this, he advances money, any required amount, on mortgage security.

    What Chicago German does not know the name of John Buehler Sr., the founder of this firm in which he has been the ruling spirit for more than a quarter ...

    German
    II A 2, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 01, 1890
    Foreman Bros.

    One of the best known German banking houses of our city, the firm of Foreman Bros., was founded by Gerhard Foreman, a well known, conscientious German, who later bequeathed the property to his sons. The year 1889 has been one of the most successful periods in the company's history and the results are indeed very gratifying. The brothers have shown considerable perspicacity, proper conduct and relentless energy in the management of their affairs. They continued the business which their highly respected father had built on such a solid foundation, and they may be well satisfied with their successful achievement, the reward of a difficult task, as they practice a little retrospection in regard to the past year. They maintain a regular banking business, accept deposits of any amount; buy and sell bonds, mercantile and other valuable papers; loan large sums of money on mortgages; so their financial connections and enterprises are very extensive.

    2

    Their influence and importance can only be appreciated when one considers the great popularity which this firm enjoys. Of all nationalities the Germans, especially have shown them unlimited confidence, and none of their many customers have ever been disappointed by this large firm.

    One of the best known German banking houses of our city, the firm of Foreman Bros., was founded by Gerhard Foreman, a well known, conscientious German, who later bequeathed the ...

    German
    II A 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 01, 1890
    The Wm. Schmidt Baking Co.

    The Germans can look with justifiable pride upon one of the greatest business ventures of its kind, which had a very modest and small beginning in 1874, when it was brought to life by a very capable German. It stands today, an astounding monument to the success of an able, enterprising, and progressively spirited, business man. We refer to Mr. Wm Schmidt, or rather as his firm is now known, to the Wm. Schmidt Baking Co. In the beginning, about 1870, Mr. Schmidt functioned as the worker. The daily receipts after its initial opening, were less than one dollar. Within fifteen years his income mounted to $800,00 or $900,00 per day. To obtain such an expansion, requires excellent business sagacity, an untiring energy, and that rare talent of giving a hand when needed. Mr. Schmidt was well versed in the lore of success; he made his establishment a model to be emulated. It is an excellently appointed store with the best and most select merchandise, a comfortable office, gigantic storage space, immaculately clean baking rooms, packing and machinery halls which are wonders of the trade, in fact, wherever one glances the beholder is confronted with proofs of constant progress and business energy which elicit admiration. During the month of March, however, at a time when Mr. Schmidt was away on an extensive business trip, he suffered a severe misfortune. His

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    splendid establishment was completely destroyed by fire, a mere remnant of dust and ashes, but on October 3rd, like the mythological Phoenix, it grew anew and today the officials of the organization, and Mr. Schmidt in particular, look upon the past year as a successful one, in spite of the calamity that confronted them. Mr. Schmidt is a highly esteemed member of many German clubs.

    The Germans can look with justifiable pride upon one of the greatest business ventures of its kind, which had a very modest and small beginning in 1874, when it was ...

    German
    II A 2, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 01, 1890
    S. E. Gross Real Estate.

    Every reader of the Illinois Staats Zeitung and, therefore, every German of Chicago and vicinity knows the great real estate corporation of S. E. Gross, and recognizes its admirable, enterprising management and extensive transactions. No other real estate company has had as many German customers, or has brought such happiness to German families as has this firm because of its policy, to sell real estate on the most liberal terms. In order to fully comprehend the magnitude and surprising achievements of the firm, one must peruse a few figures. Last year, the company's sales in Grossdale reached the sum of $572,925.00, in Dauphin Park $444,376.00, in Avondale $250,794.00, on Ashland Avenue $135,685.00, in Humboldt Park $143,490.00, on Archer Avenue $118,115.00, on Madison Street $89,025.00, in Gross Park $68,115.00, in Brookdale $36,097.00 and in other subdivisions and towns $701,983.00. In order to take care of such a huge volume, its main office employs fifteen department superintendents, thirty five clerks, one hundred and eighty five salesmen and twenty advertisement writers. Particular stress must be laid to the fact, that the company sells mainly to Germans and thereby brings a good, tranquil class of people into a neighborhood; people who take pride in improving their homes from year to year; and this has resulted in beautification of all the city districts which Mr.

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    Gross has founded. Mr. Gross is the founder of sixteen towns and localities; he has plotted more than one hundred subdivisions; sold over thirty thousand building sites, and built seven thousand or more. Whenever he has planned a division, one finds suitable transportation with adequate connections to the city, by railroad, cable, or ordinary horse-car. Schools, churches, stores and other public buildings are also present when the first homes of a new district are available for occupancy. One factor which has had much to do in creating the phenominal success of the firm, may be found in the fact, that its methods enable anyone to own a home at the easiest conceivable installment rates, and that Mr. Gross during his entire business career, never has foreclosed a mortgage, also that he considers the interest of his customers above those of other representatives in the real estate field. He satisfies his clients and, in consideration of the friendly considerate treatment they have received, they reciprocate by trying to fulfill their part of the agreement.

    Every reader of the Illinois Staats Zeitung and, therefore, every German of Chicago and vicinity knows the great real estate corporation of S. E. Gross, and recognizes its admirable, enterprising ...

    German
    II A 2, II F
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 01, 1890
    Hermann Schaffner & Company.

    The name of Hermann Schaffner is probably the best known among the local bankers. Not because he happens to be the principal of H. Schaffner & Company, and as such represents the largest banking business, but because his talent for that vocation facilitated commerce considerably by the adoption and use of commercial papers. Last year, the exchange of mercantile papers amounted to $20,000,000, which, at the and of the fiscal year in 1889, increased to $25,000,000. Mr. Schaffner is considered one of the most talented (verbatim, - we would say, capable) financiers, hence the ever mounting confidence which the inhabitants of this city have in his ability, is but natural. When he was a cashier of the former German National Bank, his employers noted his ability and expressed great hopes for his future.

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    He not only justified them, he exceeded them, by far. With his partner, A. G. Becker, he founded the present business in the year 1872, and brought it to such heights, that it is not exceeded by any similar enterprise. His regular banking business and depository brought him a considerable increase in customers. The leading Germans and representatives of other nations also belong to his clientele.

    The name of Hermann Schaffner is probably the best known among the local bankers. Not because he happens to be the principal of H. Schaffner & Company, and as such ...

    German
    II A 2
  • Svenska Tribunen -- January 02, 1890
    [The Death Toll Continues]

    The Death Toll in Chicago through Railway crossing accidents was unusually large during the year of 1889. Not less than Two-hundred fifty persons lost their lives in this manner - fifty more than during the previous year. In one day alone, on Tuesday of last week, seven people were killed at railroad crossings, four within the City limits and three, the Revell family, in Wilmette. All these murders, for they can hardly be called anything else, must primarily be laid at the doorsteps of the railroads and secondarily upon the city administration

    It is expressly provided for in the City's ordinances that the railway companies must install, or cause to have installed, safety gates at all crossings and provide a watchman at all such places. They are further required to provide all other pre-cautionary measures for the safe guarding of lives for all, who in their daily 2pursuits have to cross the tracks. But these laws have been and still remain a dead letter on the statute books and the railroads no doubt will be permitted to add victim after victim to their list and without fear of punishment to increase the already horribly large number of deaths because of negligence and indifference on their part.

    The Death Toll in Chicago through Railway crossing accidents was unusually large during the year of 1889. Not less than Two-hundred fifty persons lost their lives in this manner - ...

    Swedish
    I H, I D 1 a
  • Svornost -- January 02, 1890
    [A Demonstration of Progress]

    An unusual experiment was conducted by the Czech-American school on 18th St. when there was a tour of inspection by the parents and patrons of the school. The purpose of the visit was to ascertain what progress was being made by the children and to distribute presents to the children. From 10 to 12:00 A.M. the 2nd grade was tested in English, reading, and arithmetic and proved to the parents that they were sufficiently versed in these subjects. After the second and first grades showed their ability and sang "My Country 'Tis of Thee", then the crowd adjourned to the assembly hall where the older children were given a chance to show what they knew.

    The session lasted until 5 o'clock in order to give all the children an opportunity. Arithmetic and reading in Bohemian was also featured in the program. The program was an inspiration to the those present as it showed conclusively what can be done with good teaching.

    An unusual experiment was conducted by the Czech-American school on 18th St. when there was a tour of inspection by the parents and patrons of the school. The purpose of ...

    Bohemian
    II B 2 f
  • Svenska Tribunen -- January 02, 1890
    [Starving Man Steals]

    Charles H. Johnson, a Swedish laborer, the other day went into Bartholdy's hardware store at 240 W. Chicago, Avenue and asked the woman behind the counter for some money. When he was refused, he grabbed hold of a large tin kettle and walked out with it. Upon being arrested he said that he had stolen for the purpose of being sent to Bridewell, where he would get food. He had not worked for four months and was starving.

    Charles H. Johnson, a Swedish laborer, the other day went into Bartholdy's hardware store at 240 W. Chicago, Avenue and asked the woman behind the counter for some money. When ...

    Swedish
    II E 2, I D 2 c
  • Abendpost -- January 03, 1890
    [Formation of a Workers Union]

    A letter directed to the editor in the interests of German, Bohemian and Irish workers of the stock yards, complains about the withholding of funds approximately $60,000 belonging to the laborers. Editors reply in part, "Information obtained by our reporter shows that amounts ranging from $15,00 to $55.00 per man have been retained by Swift and Company and Nelson Norris.

    The companies in question retain an average of $20 from each employee; same of these corporations even disdain giving a receipt, on the pretext of giving the employer security against resigning employees. Thus the company enjoys the use of $60,000 without interest. Norris only is considerate enough to write a receipt. While this system protects the employer, there is no reciprocity to the worker, in case of dismissal. A union is to be inaugurated next Sunday to cope with this injustice.

    A letter directed to the editor in the interests of German, Bohemian and Irish workers of the stock yards, complains about the withholding of funds approximately $60,000 belonging to the ...

    German
    I D 1 a, I E, I C, III G