The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- January 02, 1889
    Sozialer Turnverein.

    About 2,000 persons, guests of the Soziale Turnverein, celebrated New Year's eve at Mueller's Hall, Sedgewick and North Avenue. The children of the Sunday School performed gymnastic feats, while several other societies contributed to the success by songs and recitals.

    Around 11 o'clock the Christmas celebration started. A giant Christmas tree, which almost reached the ceiling, was lighted. The girls of the gym class received red plush pocket-books as gifts, the boys caps with the letters S. T. B. About 500 more children received candy and fruit.

    During the New Year's tableau the "Marseillaise" was played and enthusiastically sung by all those present.

    About 2,000 persons, guests of the Soziale Turnverein, celebrated New Year's eve at Mueller's Hall, Sedgewick and North Avenue. The children of the Sunday School performed gymnastic feats, while several ...

    German
    III B 3 a, II B 3, II B 1 a, II B 2 f
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- January 02, 1889
    Free Speech in Chicago.

    Master-in-Chancery Windes announced his decision the day before yesterday in the case of the laborers' association vs. Roche, Hubbard and Bonfield. We took the trouble to read the voluminous act from beginning to end, but have to confess that we still do not know the standpoint of Mr. Windes in regard to the controversy.

    We gained the impression, while reading the document, that it evaded the real issue. Mr. Windes does not intend to violate the constitution but at the same time he does not want to hurt Messrs. Roche, Hubbard and Bonfield too much. He states that in the United States we have the right of free assembly and of free speech, and that the police should not prevent such meetings, but should rather prosecute those who misuse free speech in accordance with the penal code.

    He declares further that the club heroes of this city were in the wrong when prohibiting the meetings of the laborers' association - but at the same time he refuses to recommend to the judge the issuance of an injunction. He thus says in short: "The members of the laborers' association are of course right and the police consequently wrong; but it is impossible to pass judgment 2in favor of the one or the other."

    This is the impression which Mr. Windes' opinion gives, and we find the same thoughts expressed in the leading articles of certain English newspapers. The Herald, the most frequently abusive paper, says for instance: "Windes has to deal with mad dogs. They have no rights here. They would do well in leaving our city. Nobody cares for their feelings or their privileges. Chicago is giving its authorities carte blanche to make anarchism hated and unpopular."

    This statement is more explicit than the one Mr. Windes dared to make. Whoever is not convinced that we are living here in the best of worlds, whoever has the stupid belief that things here could still be improved, has no rights here. He is a mad dog and deserves to be killed as a mad dog.

    In order to achieve this, the policemen are given free rein to do absolutely anything. They are permitted to have their stools, throw bombs and later to hang innocent people for it.

    They furthermore are allowed to "find" bombs - as Bonfield is already doing 3from time to time - and to invent lies about robbery, in order to make the "anarchists" more hated and unpopular. The more such robbery tales can be invented the better.

    For so much the sooner will these "obstinate foreigners" become odious, repulsive and abhorrent to the public at large.

    Master-in-Chancery Windes announced his decision the day before yesterday in the case of the laborers' association vs. Roche, Hubbard and Bonfield. We took the trouble to read the voluminous act ...

    German
    I E, I C, II B 2 d 1
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- January 03, 1889
    The Laborers Association Versus Bonfield and Consorts.

    In re: Arbeiterbund vs. Roche and consorts, the law has not reached its limit yet with Master-in-Chancery Thomas J. Windes' memorial. The Arbeiter-bund could not feel content with this rhetoric which did not contain anything but the oft-repeated assurance that the Bund was right. The Bund should take legal steps in a different direction.

    Corporation Counsel Green intimated yesterday that court appeals of people, ill-favored by the police, should be rejected without arguments for - if the judge and the public were to be informed as much about the purposes and intentions of the Arbeiter bund as the city authorities know, it would harm the whole matter more than help it.

    Mr. Green has already declared that, in case the judges give the Bund permits to hold its meetings, the city would have to proceed against the Bund-members under the common conspiracy law, as soon as an overt act is committed within the borders of Illinois. (That such act will take place is Mr. Bonfield's job.)

    2

    As the matter stands now, the members of the Bund as well as the corporation counsels have appealed Mr. Windes' explanations, which will be argued before Judge Tuley today.

    In re: Arbeiterbund vs. Roche and consorts, the law has not reached its limit yet with Master-in-Chancery Thomas J. Windes' memorial. The Arbeiter-bund could not feel content with this rhetoric ...

    German
    I E
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- January 03, 1889
    (No headline)

    To the German Bricklayers of Chicago:

    Brothers, Friday, Jan. 4th, at 8 P. M., the election of officers of our union will once more take place. We German members for well-known reasons - have always wanted to have a German president and treasurer in office. This wish can become reality next Friday evening.

    It is furthermore to the interest of every member to see that the elected officers justify their confidence.

    I do not want to mention any person already nominated as I could then be accused of partisanship. However, I want to request you, German brothers, to be all there tomorrow evening and stand up for our union and its best interests.

    2

    Get rid of your indolence and take care of your own affairs. Think that you have to sow first before you can reap.

    Our union needs a complete reorganization and if this is not started soon by determined, intelligent men and we do not give to this work our whole, active support, we can easily today prophesy that the new hall will become our own burial place - and that this year. The tombstone would bear the following inscription: "Here once lived the bricklayers from Chicago - they succumbed to indolence and indifference."

    Voice of the people.

    W. L.

    To the German Bricklayers of Chicago: Brothers, Friday, Jan. 4th, at 8 P. M., the election of officers of our union will once more take place. We German members for ...

    German
    I D 2 a 2, I C
  • The Occident -- January 04, 1889
    The Jewish Training School

    The Jewish Training School which was called in life during the spring of last year, is now assuming a tangible form and will shortly be a fait accompli. The committee heretofore appointed to look up a suitable site, has secured a plat of ground in the very midst where the projectors of the association designed to do the most good, to wit: Fifty five feet frong by one hundred and ten feet deep, and another lot adjoining same of 27 X 110 feet on the corner of Judd and Clinton Streets, for which they paid about $22,000, and at a meeting held last Wednesday evening, they resolved to obtain plans from architects so as to facilitate the earliest erection of this much needed philanthropical institution.

    The Jewish Training School which was called in life during the spring of last year, is now assuming a tangible form and will shortly be a fait accompli. The committee ...

    Jewish
    II B 2 f
  • Skandinaven -- January 05, 1889
    Why Not?

    Why would it not be proper and entirely fitting if the presidential electors of Minnesota selected our worthy friend, the Hon. Mons Grinager, as their representative to convey the "sacred urn" of their ballots to the national capitol? This is merely a suggestion on our part. The Skandinaven has no intention of dictating to the electors of Minnesota, or anyone else, what they should do, but we have been accustomed to associate the name of Captain Grinager with what is honorable and patriotic and of good repute in Minnesota politics. We believe that the people of the state generally agree with us in that view. If we are not misinformed as to his character since the time he fought gallantly in the defense of the Union to the present time, he has proved himself such a citizen as we are endeavoring to make of all our Scandinavian countrymen. A merited compliment to him would be a compliment to the nationality, and a distinct approval of honest efforts for becoming true American citizens. There probably was no nationality in Minnesota that unanimously supported the Republican ticket more than the Scandinavian. It would certainly not be unfitting, therefore, if one of that race should convey the decision of the state to the country at large.

    Why would it not be proper and entirely fitting if the presidential electors of Minnesota selected our worthy friend, the Hon. Mons Grinager, as their representative to convey the "sacred ...

    Norwegian
    I F 5, I C
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- January 05, 1889
    Sozialer Turnverein.

    The Soziale Turnverein is developing a strength which in this "blossom time of cowards and scoundrels" - can be considered by every sincere friend of progress as a joyous sign of the times. Hardly one year in existence, the club has already bought the lot for building its hall.

    It is situated at Belmont and Racine Avenues and cost $5,000. We have only one wish: to see the "Soziale" soon in its own hall - in the interest of all the friends of truth.

    The Soziale Turnverein is developing a strength which in this "blossom time of cowards and scoundrels" - can be considered by every sincere friend of progress as a joyous sign ...

    German
    II B 3, I E, III B 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 07, 1889
    [The Goethe Lodge]

    In connection with the election of officers of the Goethe Lodge, No. 26, at the workers hall yesterday afternoon, a concert and play were also on the program. The newly installed officers were: Henry Mueller, President; Robert Kummer, vice-President; E. R. Hoffmann, Secretary; Anton Seis, Secretary of Finances; and Christian Muth, Treasurer. The evening's entertainment consisted of the performance of "The Butcher's Farewell", a play in one act. The role butcher Stelpe was in the hands of William Roseke, and the part of his wife, Amanda, was played by Jean Wormser. Both of the participants exhibited talent and added to the fun of the evening. Next on the program was Miss Clara Barton in the song "Wine, Women and Song", and William Roseker in the solo "A Gallant Husband". Both were loudly applauded. For the final number the lively courtroom scene, "He is Deaf" was chosen, in which Messrs. Roseke and Wormser and Miss Barton participated.

    In connection with the election of officers of the Goethe Lodge, No. 26, at the workers hall yesterday afternoon, a concert and play were also on the program. The newly ...

    German
    III B 2, II D 1, II B 1 a, II B 1 c 1
  • Skandinaven -- January 08, 1889
    Criminal Libel

    Editor Jens J. Christensen of the Arbeiter Zeitung was arrested last Saturday and charged with criminal libel. He had been a little too hard on some politician in an article he had written. He was released on bail.

    Editor Jens J. Christensen of the Arbeiter Zeitung was arrested last Saturday and charged with criminal libel. He had been a little too hard on some politician in an article ...

    Danish
    II E 2, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 09, 1889
    German Water Simpletons

    A new society under the name of the "National German American Prohibition League" was founded yesterday by our German temperance fanatics. The "noble" aim of this society is to employ all possible means for the enforcement of prohibition. Yesterday's meeting was called in order to organize, but if we could arrive at conclusions, judging by the size of the attendance, the life of the newly formed society is as good as doomed. The stand of the Germans on the question of prohibition is well known and only a day dreamer or a cold water apostle could hope for success. There were hardly enough persons present to appoint the necessary officers. After they had satisfied themselves reciting many empty phrases, the following officers were elected: Henry Ricke, President; B. A. Eisener, Wheaton, Illinois, and J. H. Nitz, St. Joseph, Michigan, Vice-Presidents; J. H. Reissman, Madison, Wisconsin, Secretary and E. G. Schultz, Elgin, Illinois, Treasurer.

    A new society under the name of the "National German American Prohibition League" was founded yesterday by our German temperance fanatics. The "noble" aim of this society is to employ ...

    German
    I B 1, I C