The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- January 03, 1888
    The German Theater.

    Our German population has become theater conscious! Contrary to former years when the management of the German theater has everlastingly shown a deficit, and when one fiasco followed the other, this season has recorded thus far a new and almost magic transformation in its history. The company performs before a "sold out" house now, instead of as before, row after row of vacant seats. The four directors of the company were very persevering in their efforts, in that they were aided by the rest of the company's very good artists, and thus have won the public's admiration....

    We frankly admit, that there have been many years since any German theater company has brought to the eyes of the audience so well rehearsed and rounded performances.... The prominent newspapers of Chicago said that "the Germans were deserting their art!" The reason of course was, that the former German theater companies were not worthy of the support of the educated Germans. It is true, that our theater audiences consisted to a large extent of people who were formerly engaged in menial service and whose thriftiness laid the foundation for their present day wealth.

    2

    But the Germans, whether educated or otherwise are well able to discern between the mediocre or even worse, a poor offering for their cultural requirements. Therefore it was not surprising that German theatre companies had to play before vacant seats while now, a capacity audience acclaims the well deserving artists....

    The great Chicago Opera House was again sold out for its New Yor's performance.

    Our German population has become theater conscious! Contrary to former years when the management of the German theater has everlastingly shown a deficit, and when one fiasco followed the other, ...

    German
    II A 3 d 1, III A
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 05, 1888
    The German Hospital. Annual Meeting of the Directorate.

    The management of the German Hospital held its fourth annual meeting on January 3rd, at Niehoff's Hall, 49 LaSalle Street. After reading the year's report and statements of other officials two directors were elected for a period of three years. The address was delivered by the President, Mr. Henning..... He stated that the location at 242 Lincoln Avenue is unsuitable and too small for the requirements.... Under "achievements" the following are enumerated:

    Twelve beds only were available, but 103 patients were treated during the year....a number of ailing persons could not be admitted for lack of space; 53 were cured,....23 improved in condition, 11 were dismissed as incurable and 9 died. Of these about two-thirds died within two to three days after admission; hence, they were hopeless cases from the beginning.....3215 convalescent days are listed at a total cost of $2,357.65 or 73.66 cents per day; an average of $22.88 per patient and an average detention period of 31. 20 days for each patient. This includes all expenditures of the hospital, surely a very low figure. The demand for treatment is constantly increasing, as these figure show:

    2

    82 Germans; 10 German-Americans; 4 Swiss; 3 Bohemians; 2 Norwegians; 1 English and 1 Irish......The following denominations in reference to the above are shown: 52 Evangelical-Lutheran; 24 Catholic; 10 Evangelical; 5 Methodists; 4 Engl-United; 2 Reformed; 2 Jews; 1 Episcopalian; 3 belonging to no church. Of these 56 were female and 47 male patients. Gratuitous treatment was given to 51....The liberal support from local German sources was such, that no recourse to "collections for the Hospital" was necessary last year. Great credit is given to Dr. Schaller, staff physician, for his untiring efforts and promptness. The Superintendent Mr. E. Stremmel has been a great factor and all the members have tried to do their duty.... Plans for the future are mentioned in the next paragraph and the ideal..... a Bethesda for all the ailing....They shall sense, that it has been created to alleviate the suffering of humanity....

    The monetary requirements...$23,500 are assured by subscription; $16,500 are still needed to take care of the debts, including the five lots. The Germans 3in general, have been very generous, with few exceptions....The President closes his annual report with expressions of gratitude and invocation to God, for his blessings.

    The management of the German Hospital held its fourth annual meeting on January 3rd, at Niehoff's Hall, 49 LaSalle Street. After reading the year's report and statements of other officials ...

    German
    II D 3, I C, III C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 12, 1888
    Fritz Reuter Monument.

    The "Low-German (Dialect) Society" held its semi-annual meeting night before last. J. J. Rumpf, who presided, rather severely criticized in his annual report the lukewarm attitude in regard to the erection of a monument for Fritz Reuter. He commended the "Swabian Society", which had achieved, with the cooperation of the Germans in Chicago, the erection of a beautiful monument for their favorite German, Friedrich von Schiller, at Lincoln Park, but said that the "Low-German Society" and its branches must admit being far behind in the materialization of their plans. Then he suggested the appointment of a committee to get in touch with other "Low-German Societies" for mutual assistance in executing the plan. He also suggested that the President of the Society should try to enthuse some journalists and speakers to take part in this cause for the cultivation of Low-German dialects, and to hold lectures under the auspices of the Society.

    The "Low-German (Dialect) Society" held its semi-annual meeting night before last. J. J. Rumpf, who presided, rather severely criticized in his annual report the lukewarm attitude in regard to the ...

    German
    II C, V A 1, III B 2, I C
  • Svenska Tribunen -- February 04, 1888
    The Linne' Monument Society.

    The interest in contributing to the fund for the erection of a statue to Linne' is steadily increasing. Many different societies in the middle west are working hard and with great enthusiasm for this purpose.

    Many societies are arranging lectures, concerts, balls, and bazaars and are taking in hundreds of dollars in admission fees.

    A meeting was held last Tuesday night with the committee of the Linne' Society. The chairman reported that he had held a conference with the Commissioners of Lincoln Park the other day concerning a place for the statue. It was decided that the greenhouse should be demolished and its place be given to the new monument among the flowers. A letter from sculptor Dyverman, Stockholm, Sweden, was read at the meeting. Dyverman offered to deliver to the committee models of the statue for 9,000 Swedish kronen, and the foundry factory, Meijer & Co., Stockholm offered to cast the whole monument in copper for 250,000 and in zinc for 10,000 Swedish kronen.

    After the letter was read the chairman said he did not think it necessary to raise the suggested 40,000 then. He thought that $28,000 should be enough. Several speakers said that no conclusion should be reached until there was at least $10,000 in the treasury of the fund.

    The interest in contributing to the fund for the erection of a statue to Linne' is steadily increasing. Many different societies in the middle west are working hard and with ...

    Swedish
    II C
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- February 04, 1888
    The Socialist Turner Society The First Speaker's Report.

    To the Socialist Turn Society!

    About a year ago, a number of Turners myself included broke off our connections with the Lincoln Turn Society as the outcome of disagreements over the protest question. To establish a new Turn society was in our opinion the most important step to be taken, and should be founded upon the following basis: The platform and the resolutions of the North American Turn Federation shall not be only a meaningless scrap of paper which was written on, but it shall also be acted upon. We were convinced of the need of a new Turn society and used all of our energy to establish one. Thus the Socialistic Turn Society came into existence. Considering the fact, that our society depended almost entirely upon the laboring classes and, that this was a year of financial hardship for the radically inclined working men, the newly established 2society can justly boast of great success.

    The society's membership list reveals the satisfactory figure of 165. During the last six months 35 new members have joined the society, all of whom are persons believing in principles and in the execution of such, and did not join it for any selfish business reasons, as this is so often the case with turn and various other societies.

    The choice of Mr. Moritz Schmidt as turn teacher was never regretted. The turn school is so far restricted to very small quarters, which fact makes itself felt in the success of the school. During the last six months our active turners have participated in thirty seven turn exercises. Our cultural committee should be praised for the intellectual and cozy evenings, arranged by the committee once every month, on which occasion lectures, debates, etc., were followed with great interest by our audiences. As proof, that our society has remained true to its principles, we wish to point out the society's call for a protest mass meeting, following the Illinois Supreme Court's sanction of capital punishment imposed on the anarchists, 3and the presently called for mass meeting to protest against the proposed new immigration banishment laws. And we also wish to state that the Socialistic Turn Society was the first one of the turn societies to arrange a festival for the benefit of the defense fund....

    To the Socialist Turn Society! About a year ago, a number of Turners myself included broke off our connections with the Lincoln Turn Society as the outcome of disagreements over ...

    German
    II B 3, I E
  • Zgoda -- February 08, 1888
    A Political Ward in Distress

    A new election law, for the first time this spring, will demand that the polling booths be at least 200 feet away from any kind of a business. The 7th ward in our city already happens to be looking for a place, in conformity with the above mentioned law, but just can't seem to find any place, because there is not one block in the whole ward where there is not a saloon.

    A new election law, for the first time this spring, will demand that the polling booths be at least 200 feet away from any kind of a business. The 7th ...

    Polish
    I B 1
  • The Occident -- February 26, 1888
    (No headline)

    Mr. Leon Mandel, the New York member of our Chicago firm, Mandel Brothers, invited a dozen or so of the well-known members of our Jewish community, to meet him on Washington's birthday, at 3 P.M., in the library-room of the Standard Club. At the stated time and place, he offered as a gift from himself to our Jewish community, the sum of twenty-thousand dollars, for the purpose of establishing an industrial school building for Jewish girls, or Jewish boys and girls, as should be seen fit, annexing as the only condition that our Jewish public should work out a plan whereby the maintenance of the institution should be permanently secured. As one of the special reasons for appropriating this sum for a Chicago charity, it is stated that it is in Chicago mainly where Mr. Mandel has made his money.

    Mr. Leon Mandel, the New York member of our Chicago firm, Mandel Brothers, invited a dozen or so of the well-known members of our Jewish community, to meet him on ...

    Jewish
    IV, II B 2 f
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 01, 1888
    A Work of Art Sculpture

    A work of art which has been ordered by a well known citizen for the grave of a beloved relative is now nearing completion at the sculptural establishment of Mr. Franz Engelmann. It is a statue of St. Elizabeth, larger than life-size. The clay model which has just been finished, shows the Saint as the regent, a splendid figure of aristocratic bearing, holding a loaf of bread in one hand and with the other gathering the folds of her dress which contains a profusion of roses.. The expression of the lovely face and the mild pious eyes is indeed devine, the figure and the enshrouding drapery with its folds, the work of a master. Mr. Engelmann will become well-known as a result of this achievement, which will be executed in white Massachusetts granited by Mr. E. Burkhardt. It is to be mounted on a nine foot substructure, hewn from grey granite. Beyond doubt, it will be the most beautiful and artistic monument that ever graced a grave in Chicago Of course, the artist is not a novice, he is a pupil of the well-known German Sculptor, Prof. Karl Kauer, and of Prof. Volz of Karlsruhe. Mr. Engelmann was awarded the first Student prize, in recognition for his plans and sketches of mausoleum for a family at Mannheim. He came to America 1½ years ago, and modelled the statue "The Emigrant" for a New York building, then the "Goddess of Liberty", a 14 ft. Figure for the Capitol of Texas. He is now located in Chicago.... his studio and workshop are at the S. W. Corner of State and Monroe Streets.

    A work of art which has been ordered by a well known citizen for the grave of a beloved relative is now nearing completion at the sculptural establishment of Mr. ...

    German
    II A 3 c, III H, IV
  • The Occident -- March 02, 1888
    Temple of Sinai Congregation

    This magnificent Jewish house of worship is situated on Indiana Avenue, corner of 21st Street, and is an imposing structure. It was built in 1874--1875, and was dedicated on the eve of Passover in 1875. The architect who made the plans and superintended the erection of the building, was Mr. Dankman Adler, the same ingenious architect who designed so many of Chicago's monumental buildings, and who at present is superintending the erection of the grand "Auditorium."

    The temple covers an area 91 x 125 feet and is wholly constructed of Joliet stone. The architects have shown therein the Romanesque style, with many details, at once pleasing to the eye. The basement is divided into spacious school-rooms for the Sabbath schools and vestry meeting-halls. The main auditorium is lofty and grand. In the west-end is the pulpit, and above that the choir and organ are located; the latter is an excellent instrument containing upwards of thirty registers. The decorations are elegant and attractive. During late years, and since the ministration of Dr. Hirsch, it was found that the temple had not sufficient seating capacity, hence the congregation had a gallery constructed which projects around the main auditorium on three sides.

    2

    In this connection it may be proper to give some points from the history of the Sinai Congregation. This congregation was incorporated under the laws of the State of Illinois in the spring of the year 1861. About the same time the young congregation acquired by purchase from a Christian congregation, a church building which was located on Monroe street, between Clark and LaSalle streets. The first Jewish services therein were held on June 17 and 18, 1861, and the dedicatory sermons were preached by the Rev. Samuel Geller, of New York. At the same time Dr. B. Felsenthal entered upon his office as Rabbi of this congregation, and remained efficiently connected with it, until the month of June, 1864, when he withdrew and accepted a call from the Zion Congregation, in your city, which had then been called into existence.

    The Sinai Congregation thereupon remained for about two years without a regular Rabbi, and during this time its divine services were conducted by"Readers." In May 1866, Dr. Isaac Chronik, who had been invited to become the Rabbi of the congregation, had come over from Berlin, Germany, and entered upon his functions. Dr. Chronik returned to Germany after he had served the Sinai Congregation for about five years and six months. His successor was Dr. K. Kohler. This gentleman who had previously been officiating as Rabbi for two years in a congregation 3in Detroit, commenced his official life in Chicago in November 1871, and remained here for nearly eight years. In the Fall of 1879, Dr. Kohler left for New York; a congregation in that city having tendered him a call to become their teacher and spiritual advisor. Again the congregation was "Rabbi-less" and remained so until September 1880, when the present incumbent of the rabbincial office, the Rev. Dr. E.G. Hirsch, came here from Louisville, Ky. and began labor in the field to which he had been called in so honorable a manner. Dr. Hirsch's labors were crowned by great success, and since his coming here the congregation grew very much in number of members and in influence.

    In the beginning of this short historical sketch, it was said that the first house of worship which the congregation owned and occupied was situated on Monroe Street. In the summer of 1864 that house was sold and the congregation brought from the "Plymouth Church Congregation" their meeting-house, located on the northwest corner of Third avenue and Van Buren street. In September 1864 this new house of worship, the second temple of the Sinai Congregation, was dedicated to its sacred purposes by the late Dr. Maurine Mayer of New York City. On Oct. 9, 1871, it fell a prey to the great fire. The congregation worshipped now, at first, in the Methodist church building on Wabash avenue and 22nd street; until, as stated above, in April 1875, the new temple had been completed and dedicated.

    This magnificent Jewish house of worship is situated on Indiana Avenue, corner of 21st Street, and is an imposing structure. It was built in 1874--1875, and was dedicated on the ...

    Jewish
    III C
  • Zgoda -- March 07, 1888
    Political Club

    Article written by Mr. K. Olszewski,

    Chicago, March 1, 1888.

    The first Polish political club is now being organized in the vicinity of Main St. Citizens, hearing of this, went there and were told by well known speakers of fine reputation they would make themselves and their magistrates known. Every one present was glad to hear it and willing to do his share.

    This way we shall be able to have this political club organized. Every Pole living in this neighborhood is invited to our large meeting which is held frequently.

    K. Olszewski.

    Article written by Mr. K. Olszewski, Chicago, March 1, 1888. The first Polish political club is now being organized in the vicinity of Main St. Citizens, hearing of this, went ...

    Polish
    I F 2