The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Svenska Tribunen -- January 02, 1886
    Emigration Journey in 1885.

    Under what circumstances did the Scandinavian emigrants exist in 1885? Well, here is a statement signed by some fifty Swedish,Norwegian and Danish emigrants who came over from Gothenburg to New York Christmas 1885:

    "We, the undersigned Swedish, Norwegian and Danish emigrants, who now have made a happy journey from Gothenburg direct to New York on the big and splendid steamer "Katie of Svenska Linjen, will herewith, before we make our landing, express our deep thankfulness to officers and stewards for all the courtesy they have shown us and their good treatment during our journey. Everything has been kept so nice and clean and the meals served three times a day, have been sufficient and good. We were served coffee, newly baked wheat bread and butter for breakfast. Dinner consisted of white cabbage soup, freshly boiled meat and potatoes, pudding or pea soup with pork and fruit soup, and we were served tea fresh bread, and butter with herring and potatoes. Coffee was served extra in the afternoon.

    "Katie" is a big and powerful steamer and a good one too. We met a terrific 2storm on the ocean, which delayed our journey two days, but we did not suffer much. The waves went sky high and old seamen told us they had never gone through such a storm before. When the weather was nice, we enjoyed walking on the large poop, which was opened to the emigrants. The convenience for third class passengers was far better than what other steamers present.

    Some of us have made the trip over the Atlantic on stylish steamships, but the steamer "Katie" was much more pleasant in every way than any other ship we have found in travelling to and from the United States.

    We will, therefore, recommend Svenska Linjen most heartily to everyone.

    Under what circumstances did the Scandinavian emigrants exist in 1885? Well, here is a statement signed by some fifty Swedish,Norwegian and Danish emigrants who came over from Gothenburg to New ...

    Swedish
    III G
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 02, 1886
    Records for Real Estate (Editorial)

    Twelve or thirteen years ago, when the great Chicago fire had destroyed the Archives and Record books of Cook County, the creation of a substitute to make possible purchases and sales of real estate was felt to be indispensable. There existed two private concerns that had saved their extensive collections of abstracts from the records and they had merged in order to extort enormous prices for abstract copies. (They laid under contribution) the unfortunates who had to sell a lot or a building and were compelled to deliver the buyer a good title of possession. The evil became so intolerable that relief through the County Board was demanded especially by the Germans. The county therefore bought for $40,000 the collection of a private firm (Peltzer) and put it under the administration of the Recorder whose duty it is to carry them further, to complete them as much as possible, and to furnish copies for moderate fees.

    This arrangement proved very satisfactory and the majority of the middle and small property owners were very well satisfied with it. Not so however, the immensely rich abstract firm whose appressive monoply was broken, nor the greedy real estate dealers and lawyers , who were believed to have shared in the profit from the excessive prices on furnished abstract. These individuals 2tried from the start to cast susoicion on the books of the Recorder. The more they succeeded, the higher the blood taxes they can collect for their abstracts. They would enjoy immensely seeing the abstract business of the county abolished, and the Record books of the archives sold. But as this desire would have to confront judicial decisions, their next step is to have the Record books leased to private people for the paltry sum of $3,000 a year.

    Unfortunately, there seems to be a circle at the present County Board that favors the dissipation of a highly valuable asset in favor of a covetous monoply.

    To the shame of the Tribune, be it said that this great newspaper that otherwise flows over with hyoocritical reform phrases, recommends highly the rascality, contemplated. (The Record books that were bought for $40,000, and have been kept for twelve years in the hands of individuals who can charge any price for copies already have a value of at least 1/2 million dollars). If another $35,000 to $40,000 would be used for their completion, their value would be at least 1/2 million dollars. The yearly net profit for the county is already #3,400. But the property owners who receive copies from the Recorder gain much more than this by the low fees that are charged.

    The Republicans have the majority in the present County Board. The responsibility 3rests upon their shoulders. As for the German members of the County Board, they should not forget that the inauguration of the County Recorder's Office followed the desire and the interests of many German property owners, and that these in general are well satisfied. In the plan to dissipate the record books, there is so much money involved for the interested private individuals that those members of the County Board who favor it, would have to bring up exceedingly strong counter arguments to exculpate themselves from the suspicion of corruption.

    Twelve or thirteen years ago, when the great Chicago fire had destroyed the Archives and Record books of Cook County, the creation of a substitute to make possible purchases and ...

    German
    I F 3, I C, I D 1 a
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 10, 1886
    Der Westen Sunday Edition The Administration of the St. Sonifacius Cemetey and of the Orphan Home in Pose Hill. Anaual Meeting of the Boare of Directors.

    At the refectory of the Franciscan Convent, the yearly meeting of the Directors of the Catholic Orphanage and the Catholic St. Bonifagius Cemetery was held under the chairmanship of the Rev. Father Fischer. The priest of every German Catholic parsonage and two members of each parish participated as representatives. Rev. Father Fischer made a speech in which he related that at the time of the foundation of the cemetery only four German parishes existed in this city and that it was a hard struggle before the Catholics, who were then hated received a permit to found their own cemetery. This was in 1863. Today the parishes share the cemetery. Four small parishes founded the cemetery in the belief that it would provide resting places for the dead for an endless number of years. Today, with more than 80,000 German Catholics in Chicago, new cemeteries soon will have to be established. The same is true of the Orphan home, but in an even more pressing way, 183 children have found a good home there, thanks to the unselfish service of twelve servants of Christ. During the last year, 1,132 Catholics found their last resting place at the St. Bonifacius Cemetery.

    A sum of $1,000 was received by the Orphan Home from the Katholischer Jugend 2Freund which represents the net profit of this publication edited by the Rev. Aloys Thiele at 1 North Clark St.

    At the refectory of the Franciscan Convent, the yearly meeting of the Directors of the Catholic Orphanage and the Catholic St. Bonifagius Cemetery was held under the chairmanship of the ...

    German
    III C, II D 4
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 14, 1886
    Depot Altenheim

    Mr. A. C. Hesing, President of the Old People's Home, yesterday handed Mr. Weege, the General Director of the Wisconsin Central Railroad, a petition of the Directors to open a depot near the Old People's Home. Mr. Hesing left with the promise that a depot within one hundred feet of Madison Street will be erected and that it shall carry the name "Altenheim". He also received the promise that the territory East of Altenheim Boulevard will not be built on, but that it will be laid out and planted, so that in the summer small picnics may be held there.

    Mr. A. C. Hesing, President of the Old People's Home, yesterday handed Mr. Weege, the General Director of the Wisconsin Central Railroad, a petition of the Directors to open a ...

    German
    II D 5, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 19, 1886
    The Abstract Records and the Chicago Tribune (Editorial)

    The Chicago Tribune, in an article yesterday, tries to clear itself on the reproach that it does agree with the abstract monopolists by trying to make its readers believe, that behind the assignment given the Recorder - the lawfully installed officer - for completion of the abstract books a "job", an impure business, was being urged, this is clearly nonsensical, for the Recorder could gain no other advantage from this assignment that perhaps an increase of its political influence by hiring more office help. It is the other side, the one represented by the Tribune, the side of Mr. Simmons, former partner and present agent of the abstract monopoly firm, that expects to garner large profits by the abolition of the county competition. From a dependable source, we hear that a considerable sum of money is deposited in order to make the county fathers more compliant. It is said the amount was $15,000. What the Tribune was promised for its assistance, we do not know. It supports every robbery of the public, just as it once recommended giving the franchise of the right of way for 99 years to the street car companies, for what cause and reasons, it best knows itself. The Citizen's Association also recognizes that the sale of the abstract books to Simmons would be a great economic mistake and has lodged an energetic protest through its representative.

    The Chicago Tribune, in an article yesterday, tries to clear itself on the reproach that it does agree with the abstract monopolists by trying to make its readers believe, that ...

    German
    I F 3, I D 1 a
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 19, 1886
    A Chemical Motor for Operating the Street Cap System

    The inventive spirit of a German engineer was praised yesterday by a large number of our fellow citizens who during the noon hour saw with astonishment two unknown street - cars travel to the barns of the Chicago Passenger Railway Company on Centre Avenue. The company had imported the two cars from Germany and wanted to demonstrate them to the public in a few days. On the insistance of two marine engineers who are here from New York, the officials felt obliged yesterday to arrange a test ride. This type of car has been used for some time in the outskirts of Berlin and have proved very satisfying. The driving power that causes its locomotion is produced in a kettle filled with caustic soda. The power is so strong that by a single heating of the kettle, it can drive the main car, that carries the kettle and which looks like our ordinary cars, and also, two additional passenger cars over a distance of more than 40 miles. The new "chemical" car is 11 feet long and 7 feet wide. One of the advantages of the new motors is that by means of opening a valve the entire car can be filled with hot air. The brakes are very easy to operate. Only one man (both conductor and motorman is needed for its operation. The unnecessary noise, caused by horse drawn and cable cars is abolished and the cost of operating is extremely cheap. A new motor cost between $2,000 and $2,500.

    The Chicago Passenger Railway Company will within a short time outfit its entire service system with the new motors.

    The inventive spirit of a German engineer was praised yesterday by a large number of our fellow citizens who during the noon hour saw with astonishment two unknown street - ...

    German
    II A 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 31, 1886
    German-English Kindergartens.

    The plan of the local district of the National German-American School Association to open, if possible, with the start of the new year (Sept. 1), Free German-English Kindergartens on the North, South, Northwest and Southwest sides of the city, has met with general approval amongst the Germans of Chicago. Now it is necessary to start with the realization of the beautiful thought. The furnishing of the four kindergartens, furniture and teaching material, will require about $2,000.

    The school association expects to obtain localities free of charge from local school, and church parishes, or clubs. The salaries of four teachers and assistants are estimated to amount to $3,000. The entire expense for the first year will amount to about $5,000.

    2

    The expenses for buying and upkeep of furniture and teaching materials will, of course, decrease in future years, so that the average expense will be around $4,000 a year, or $1,000 per Kindergarten. Inorder to obtain the means to execute the plans, the local school association should grow to a membership of 5,000 individuals, who would pay an annual contribution of at least $1 each. Should not there be found such a member of public spirited men and women among the 230,000 Germans of Chicago? We do not doubt it!

    But still more is necessary than what we already mentioned. The project must not remain dependent on a casual offering. Furthermore, the number of German-English kindergartens should be increased in future years. They shall become lasting and useful places for cultivation of the German language. Therefore it is necessary to create, little by little, funds the interest on which will take care of the upkeep of the kindergartens.

    3

    For the realization of these plans a Ladies Club already has been founded within the National German-American School Association. Also German lodges and clubs were requested by the administration to grant yearly contributions.

    The plan of the local district of the National German-American School Association to open, if possible, with the start of the new year (Sept. 1), Free German-English Kindergartens on the ...

    German
    II B 2 f, III A
  • Der Westen -- February 07, 1886
    An Order - Jubilee

    In a young city like Chicago a twenty-five year jubilee has a special value, especially when it is celebrated by a club that is anxious for the welfare of all its members. The "Arbeiter-Unterstuetzungs - Vereins-Orden" (Order of Workmen's Benevolent Society), usually called the A.U.V.O., belongs to those long-existing clubs that work their good deeds silently and do not show off before the outside world. But last night a lively audience came together at Brand's Hall, Clark and Erie Streets, to celebrate the Twenty-five Year Jubilee of Club No. 1 of this order. As the order consists exclusively of Germans, and the German language receives preference among its members, it was a true German festival that was celebrated by the brave because free and independent of all other existing labor organizations, laborers, and their families.

    The Order counts at present 450 members and is subject to the administration of a Grand Lodge. It pays weekly sickness benefits of $5.00 and a death benefit of $200. and $50.00 for funeral expenses.

    In a young city like Chicago a twenty-five year jubilee has a special value, especially when it is celebrated by a club that is anxious for the welfare of all ...

    German
    II B 1 c 3, II D 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 11, 1886
    Foreign Lordsof the Manor in America (Editorial)

    A few days ago a local paper made a careful investigation about how much land fitted for settling is yet in the possession of the Federal Government. It came to the terrifying conclusion that only a few million acres are left. During the past thirty years, preferably since the year 1861, under the rule of the Republican Party, hundreds of millions of acres were wasted on railroad companies. In addition another lamentable evil was associated with this, the acquisition of large tracts of real estate by foreigners, - English and Scotch nobleman, "money bags", or in syndicates. These areas do not only consist of hundreds, but of thousands of square miles. One in Texas has not less than 4,700. On all these estates there exist no free farmers who own their property, but only tenant-farmers as in England or Ireland.

    (There follows a list of twenty-nine big landholders whose owners are foreigners) -

    These twentynine huge foreign landowners possess 32,260 square miles of land; this 2is 300 more than the area of thekingdoms of the Netherlands and Belgium combined. Would it not be wise to use here a little smoking out "a la Bismarck"?

    A few days ago a local paper made a careful investigation about how much land fitted for settling is yet in the possession of the Federal Government. It came to ...

    German
    I D 1 a, I H
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 13, 1886
    The Mud Throwing at Stallo.

    Among the ratified nominations after the reopening of the Congress, the one of Mr. Stallo as Ambassador to Rome was one of the very first, without any dispute. For the past several weeks, however, there has appeared in Anglo-American Democratic and Republican newspapers so-called "special telegrams" and similar reports, according to which Stallo, in Rome, is behaving himself in the most improper way. They have culminated in the report that Stallo at the German artists festival in Rome, has belittled the Americans in comparison with the Germans as "Barbarians," The above mentioned press inciters barked in unanimity: "Away with this slanderer of the American people 2Of course it has been proven by the reports of European newspapers that Stallo never did make any such remark, but, on the contrary, he celebrated, in his oration, the Germans and the Americans as the carriers of Germanistic culture, and especially praised the Americans as the distributors of the seed of this culture in the Western hemiphere.

    But still the insinuations continue. They originate, as has now been established, from the same Democratic gang of enquirers, in Cincinnati, who tried to make it impossible for Ambassador Pendleton to go to Berlin. To this gang the independent thinking and acting Stallo, although for years a supporter of the Democratic National Party, is just as hateful as the Reform Democrat Pendleton.

    3

    But these lies about Mr. Stallo to President Cleveland, could do just as much harm as they did to Pendleton. As is reported from best sources, President Cleveland on February 18, told the Democratic Senator Payne of Ohio, who tried to influence him against Stallo: "In the unfavorable reports about Mr. Stallo there is not one word of truth. Besides, Mr. Stallo was nominated by me as Ambassador to Rome not because he is a citizen of Ohio, but because he is one of the most important representatives of the Germans of the United States." And this is all about this affair!

    Among the ratified nominations after the reopening of the Congress, the one of Mr. Stallo as Ambassador to Rome was one of the very first, without any dispute. For the ...

    German
    III B 1, I C