The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 03, 1885
    Deutsche Gesellschaft (The German Aid Society)

    The Executive Committee of the German Aid Society held an important meeting yesterday, in order to come to a decision regarding German soup kitchens. There are more unemployed this year than during last winter. The misery is particularly severe among newcomers from Germany, who do not speak sufficient English to contact freely with employers of any kind throughout the city.

    The establishment of soup kitchens would be a great blessing for this multitude of unemployed men who in the majority are single and homeless. The German Aid Society has received, already, generous offers from German groceries, meat markets and bakeries concerning permanent donations of food supplies. This will be a great help towards the upkeep of the planned soup kitchens. There will be a soup kitchen in every district of Chicago. The German Ladies' Society has expressed its willingness to cooperate in every way, to make the humanitarian enterprise a success.

    There will be another meeting next week to hasten the opening of the German soup kitchens.

    The Executive Committee of the German Aid Society held an important meeting yesterday, in order to come to a decision regarding German soup kitchens. There are more unemployed this year ...

    German
    II D 10, III G, III B 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 06, 1885
    The German Language in Lake View

    A great many German residents of Lake View held a meeting, yesterday afternoon, at Korn's Hall, presided over by F. W. Labahn, who introduced Mr. E. Rummel as speaker of the day. Mr. Rummel explained the standpoint of Lake View German settlers, who have wished since many years the introduction of German in instruction in Lake View public schools.

    All further action on this subject was transferred to an agitation committee, which will start at once to circulate twelve petitions at the same time, in order to get the necessary number of signatures towards the realization of the plan.

    A great many German residents of Lake View held a meeting, yesterday afternoon, at Korn's Hall, presided over by F. W. Labahn, who introduced Mr. E. Rummel as speaker of ...

    German
    I A 1 b
  • Svenska Tribunen -- January 07, 1885
    St.Ansgarius Sunday School

    The Sunday School of St.Ansgarius Episcopal Church will arrange a Christmas festival in its newly decorated church at Sedgwick St. and Chicago Ave. on Tuesday, January 6th at 7:30 P.M.

    These Christmas festivals in St. Ansgarius for the children are always very well liked both by young and old, but this time the committee in charge has promised a well arranged musical program. The bishop will address the congregation; good songs and music will be presented, and the children will enjoy the sight of a tall nicely decorated Christmas tree.

    The Sunday School of St.Ansgarius Episcopal Church will arrange a Christmas festival in its newly decorated church at Sedgwick St. and Chicago Ave. on Tuesday, January 6th at 7:30 P.M. ...

    Swedish
    III C, III B 3 b
  • The Occident -- January 09, 1885
    Change of Firm

    I have this day transferred my Banking Business to my sons, Henry, Edwin and Oscar, by whom it will be conducted under the firm name of H. G. FOREMAN AND BROTHERS.

    I desire to thank my customers and friends for the patronage with which they have herectofore favored me, and to bespeak a continuance thereof for my successors.

    Girhand Foreman.

    I have this day transferred my Banking Business to my sons, Henry, Edwin and Oscar, by whom it will be conducted under the firm name of H. G. FOREMAN AND ...

    Jewish
    II A 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 22, 1885
    German Soup Kitchens (Suppen Anstalten)

    The Executive Board of the German Aid Society held a meeting last night, in the guest room of "Old Quincy No. 9",presided over by Mr. John Feldkamp, who introduced Messrs. Wilhelm Bocke and Henry Hill as speakers. They both took the standpoint that the German Aid Society, even when aided by donations, would not be strong enough, financially, to establish and maintain a soup-kitchen in every part of Chicago. A program of this magnitude can be carried out, only, with the assistance and cooperation of the city administration. Therefore, Mr. Wilhelm Thielepape was intended to write to the Mayor of New York, and ask him for information on the functioning of soup kitchens, which have been in successful operation there many years, each winter.

    The Executive Board of the German Aid Society held a meeting last night, in the guest room of "Old Quincy No. 9",presided over by Mr. John Feldkamp, who introduced Messrs. ...

    German
    II D 10
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 22, 1885
    The German Language

    The members of the board for German instruction held a special meeting, yesterday, presided over by Mr. D. Zimmermann, Superintendent of the Board of Education. Since Dr. Zimmermann has held this important position, the study of the German language has gained considerably in Chicago. He knew how to select a staff of capable German instructors, who are now teaching in all upper grades of our public schools. As a fact, more than half of all pupils are learning the German language.

    During yesterday's meeting, Dr. Zimmermann presented plans on how to intensify interest in the German language and thus carry its study to all parts of the city.

    The members of the board for German instruction held a special meeting, yesterday, presided over by Mr. D. Zimmermann, Superintendent of the Board of Education. Since Dr. Zimmermann has held ...

    German
    I A 1 b, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 26, 1885
    Dynamite Devils

    Reports on the renewed dynamite bomb murders, in London, must fill any body, whose mind is not wholly distorted with terror and shame. For thousands of years, there have been gruesome crimes and murders, committed in the name of freedom and independence. But these attacks always were directed against the personal cause of a people's misery; against cruel tyrants or evil doing oppressors. The slaughter of peaceful men, innocent women and children, in London, on January 24, 1885, is a black page in the records of human history. The Irish plotters, who carried out this crime in cold blood, do not deserve any leniency, and should be destroyed the quickest way, as soon as the law has them in custody.

    This standpoint was taken by Senator Edmunde, who is demanding the introduction of stricter laws, and more severe punishment of law breaking anarchists. It is a known fact, that all financial support, given to European plotters, has been traced back to American anarchists in New York, who should be apprehended at once.

    Reports on the renewed dynamite bomb murders, in London, must fill any body, whose mind is not wholly distorted with terror and shame. For thousands of years, there have been ...

    German
    I E, I C
  • Svenska Tribunen -- January 28, 1885
    Swedish and American Education

    Editorial: Herman Annerstedt, captain in the Swedish Navy, has written in his "Memories from America" a sarcastic article in regard to the general educational methods in Sweden as compared with young people's education in America. He says: "We have our own system in Sweden. Every boy in Sweden must have an education, either private or public, and most of them attend the public schools. When the young man is eighteen or nineteen he quits the school and starts life. He approaches life with hat and cane and white collar. He knows the names of the small rivers. He speaks Latin, Greek, Hebrew, German, French and English, sometimes Danish and Norwegian, which is a terrible mixup. But who needs them?

    No foreman can put them to work in a factory. No farmer can put a plow in such hands. He intends to serve the government or to continue his studies at the University or at some business college. He tends to these studies very well until he is nearly thirty years of age, and then he starts 2to earn his living. Can all this be right?

    All education in America has but one goal: It is your absolute duty to live, but, to live you must work. The English language dominates the grammar school. One is taught to think, speak, and write his thoughts clearly and straight forwardly. Students usually read American history, and geography. These, together with mathematics is the minimun every American gives his children up to fifteen or sixteen years of age. Then they start their lives. If one has the ambition to continue his studies, there are colleges and universities,of course, and there is plenty of room for every one. But here I speak mainly of the great working class.

    At the age of fifteen a boy has a fair education, is still young and happy and not overworked, as in Sweden, and not "boiled out," as in England. Then he gets his mother's blessing, and $25 or $30 cash from his father and uses five years- and what years to travel around and learn half a dozen trades; for a couple of months he works on a farm in Nebraska, and learns how to produce wheat. Then he starts to work in a shoemaker's shop in Boston, or as a blacksmith in New York for half a year or so. Sometimes we find him as a miner 3in Pennsylvania, and then as a carman for a couple of trips. Two years or so later we find him to be a watchmaker in St.Louis, studying philosophy in his spare time. Or he is in charge of cattle out in the prairies until he is twenty or twenty-one. Then he is a man. He hasn't read as much in books as we in the Old World, but he has experience for good or for bad.

    We conservative Scandinavians should get a lesson from all this here mentioned; viz, to change trades in time if we have made a bad choice; to do anything and everything with a little more speed; to save up for a rainy day. In other words, we should not be ashamed to work, work with our two hands!"

    Editorial: Herman Annerstedt, captain in the Swedish Navy, has written in his "Memories from America" a sarcastic article in regard to the general educational methods in Sweden as compared with ...

    Swedish
    I A 1 a, I C
  • Svornost -- January 29, 1885
    Insulting the Bohemians. (Editorial)

    As we know, a new attack was made again on us Bohemians, and its injustice, cannot be compared with the previous numerous affronts, printed in the English press against the Bohemians not only in Chicago, but in other cities. We Bohemians know very well, that this article is mendacious as is proven by the fact, that the article encompasses the entire Bohemian Nation, not only here but in Bohemia, Europe. It states for instance that we generally dwell in the worst holes. What a picture of us must be created by an individual who does not know our people?

    Certainly we must confess that there actually are somewhere some conditions, which would be hard to defend before foreigners, but the whole nation can never be blamed for this; the other nations given to us as an example - are still worse.

    It is true regarding the employment of children, that there are many parents, 2who send their children to work while very young, but this fact cannot be classed as characteristic of the entire nation. We have many wealthy Bohemians in America, who also send their children to work right after graduation from the public school. We have also a great number of poor, intelligent workingmen, who can hardly make their living expenses, but who send their children to school as long as circumstances permit.

    The same condition can be found among the Germans, who are offered us as an example. There are more points in the attack which offend our nationality and it is sufficient for our readers to peruse today the fourth page of the correspondence of Mr. Baumbruker, a Chicago inhabitant of many years. There are exceptions too If someone sees a Bohemian woman stealing corn grain or corn ears, this does not mean that all Bohemian women steal.

    We have our faults, but the same faults can be found among the immigrants of other nations, also among the Americans. On the other hand we have qualities, which ennoble our nation and if one wishes to write about some of our faults, he should not dare to include in it that the entire Bohemian nation here and in the old country. His duty would be to show to the 3readers our good qualitities also .....

    The health commissioner stated that the Bohemians as a rule live in narrow dwellings, each floor of which contains a large number of families. The same conditions will be found among other nationalities. If a Bohemian comes from abroad and has no place to sleep and one of his acquaintances keeps him until he is able to find a home, this is not proof that this condition is general in our life. The majority of us live the same way as our brother citizens, the Americans, and in many cases even better.

    As we know, a new attack was made again on us Bohemians, and its injustice, cannot be compared with the previous numerous affronts, printed in the English press against the ...

    Bohemian
    I C
  • The Occident -- January 30, 1885
    (No headline)

    There should be a higher duty to possess our Rabbis.....In New York City, we find now that the reform ministers make it a point to go among the lowly and poor to give them instruction. Why cannot Drs. Felsenthal, Grossman, Hirsch, Sale, Heller, Norden, and others of Chicago go among the South Clark Street, Pacific Avenue, Canal and Milwaukee Avenue Jewish Communities and organize Sabbath School instruction?

    There should be a higher duty to possess our Rabbis.....In New York City, we find now that the reform ministers make it a point to go among the lowly and ...

    Jewish
    I A 2 a, III A, I C