The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- January 04, 1884
    [A Socialist Shindig]

    The Socialist Club of the Southwest side held a pleasant meeting combined with dancing. Mr. Lange presided. The main points were serious and humorous lectures and plays of every kind. The socialistic Sangerbund of the Southwest side did its full share.

    It seems that there no more fun and enjoyment exists anywhere than among the Socialists as they only separated in the best of spirits early in the morning.

    The Socialist Club of the Southwest side held a pleasant meeting combined with dancing. Mr. Lange presided. The main points were serious and humorous lectures and plays of every kind. ...

    German
    I E, II B 1 c 3, II B 1 a
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- January 04, 1884
    [A Cigarmakers' Union Ball]

    The first yearly ball of the Cigarmakers' Progressive Union will be held Saturday, January 5, 1884, in the Northside Turner Hall.

    All friends are cordially invited.

    The first yearly ball of the Cigarmakers' Progressive Union will be held Saturday, January 5, 1884, in the Northside Turner Hall. All friends are cordially invited.

    German
    I D 2 a 2
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- January 06, 1884
    [A Benefit Performance]

    The Lehr & Wehrverein is holding in Nutzhorn's Hall, 636 Milwaukee Avenue, a benefit evening performance on Saturday evening, January 19th for a Comrade who has been ill for 2 years.

    The speaker of the evening was M. Schwab.

    The Lehr & Wehrverein is holding in Nutzhorn's Hall, 636 Milwaukee Avenue, a benefit evening performance on Saturday evening, January 19th for a Comrade who has been ill for 2 ...

    German
    II B 1 a, II D 10, I E, IV
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- January 07, 1884
    [A Socialist Meeting]

    The Social Club "Fraternity" held a regular monthly business meeting yesterday afternoon under the chairmanship of Comrade R. Schnaubett in Hage's Hall, corner Clybourn and Southport Avenues. Comrade Wm. Roiser dealt with the topic "Science, handmaid of Capitalism" and this occasioned a lengthy and interesting debate. --

    A mass meeting was announced for the following Sunday at Greenebaum's Hall.

    The Social Club "Fraternity" held a regular monthly business meeting yesterday afternoon under the chairmanship of Comrade R. Schnaubett in Hage's Hall, corner Clybourn and Southport Avenues. Comrade Wm. Roiser ...

    German
    II B 2 g, I E
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- January 07, 1884
    Socialists of the Northside

    Meeting on Sunday, January 7, 1884, evening 8 o'clock sharp, Thuringer Hall, 58 Clybourn Avenue.

    Agenda: 1st Lecture by Comrade Spies,

    2nd Election of Delegates

    3rd Report of the Committee

    4th other business.

    All members are invited to attend.

    Meeting on Sunday, January 7, 1884, evening 8 o'clock sharp, Thuringer Hall, 58 Clybourn Avenue. Agenda: 1st Lecture by Comrade Spies, 2nd Election of Delegates 3rd Report of the Committee ...

    German
    I E, II B 2 g, IV
  • Svenska Tribunen -- January 09, 1884
    The Emigration to America

    The emigration to America considerably decreased last year, while the number of those who returned to Sweden increased. During the first eleven months of 1883, 22,525 persons emigrated or 17,072 less than during the same period in 1882, and those who went back number 1,727 or 467 more than during 1882.

    It is interesting to notice the number of those who emigrated and those who went back during the preceding four years. We give these figures:

    1879 emigrated 13,007; back: 556
    1880 " 33,245; " 685
    1881 " 35,637; " 790
    1882 " 39,597 " 1,260

    Should we then, come to the conclusion that either the conditions in Sweden have been better or that it has been worse in the United States? Nothing of the kind. It is hard to find out the real cause of the decrease in immigration.

    2

    But new ideas among the people themselves may,to a certain extent, have caused these circumstances.

    The people have learned to see things and facts in a different light.

    The emigration to America considerably decreased last year, while the number of those who returned to Sweden increased. During the first eleven months of 1883, 22,525 persons emigrated or 17,072 ...

    Swedish
    III G
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- January 09, 1884
    [Northside Socialists Meet]

    The Socialist Club of the Northside held night before last its regular business and agitation meeting. Comrade Herman presided. Because Comrade Spies was prevented by illness to be present, Comrade Schwab gave a short lecture about "accidents". He spoke extensively about the causes of such accidents and proved that they were nothing but indirect murders.

    Nobody thought of blaming the rich and well educated murderers, but if a poor unfortunate creature was expelled from society, driven by hunger and misery to desperation and holds up somebody on a street corner, then the people are at once ready to morally condemn him. The latter should be held less responsible for his action, than the former. He (Schwab) personally could not shed any tears, if for once an exploiter, like a stock exchange robber meets with the same fate that he caused others because until such a scoundrel amasses a fortune, would a number of people be ruined. Many of these who are thus ruined commit suicide or still worse become incurably sick and demented.

    2

    and the husband of his victim (Count and Countess Herbersberg and their supposed nephew, Rudolph von Sternan). He thought that he was just about to get into possession of money when his step-sister, the former fiancee of Count Herdersberg, who broke the engagment, accused her of being the mother of the child of his future wife, Auer told him about the true situation and immediately after, met his son. The son, despairing over the disgrace, although the innocent victim, decided to end his life before the eyes of Auer, in order to punish him for the attempt to make money in such a disgraceful way, but was prevented by his mother's appearance. Auer gives his promise to his step-sister to become a better man, and she herself was cleared of suspicion; even Rudolph's mother was forgiven by her husband, for the secrecy of her misstep.

    Whether Rudolph won the hand of his cousin, the daughter of Auer's stepsister, was not quite obivious, although the ensuing dialog would give us this impression. The strength of the play lies in the exquisite protrayal of the "Revolver Journalist." Mr. Ravene, who portrayed the "Revolver Journalist", was excellent.

    The Socialist Club of the Northside held night before last its regular business and agitation meeting. Comrade Herman presided. Because Comrade Spies was prevented by illness to be present, Comrade ...

    German
    II B 2 g, I E, IV
  • Svenska Tribunen -- January 09, 1884
    Shadows and Dawns - from the Life of the Swedish-American's Struggle. By Jeppe.

    I walked the other day with an old Swedish-American in one of the more prosperous Swedish colonies some one-hundred miles from Chicago. We were talking about the old and the new times. The man was old, but his memory was fresh. The old colonists do not forget anything - not that they always can keep with the times in this country. Who can expect these gray-haired men to keep abreast of the times which are rushing as if crazy? Anyway they are those who have given an impetus to the times. I mean that respectable and fast growing Swedish-American colonies owe these pioneers not a little thanks for the progress they have made. What more can one expect?

    The old colonist does not forget anything. Haven't you noticed how fully the past world lays before him? He has been here for thirty, perhaps forty years, but do not think that this time has dimmed the curtain picture of his native land. We young ones, who have been on the American stage for only ten or fifteen years don't care to recall the time when we were struggling in the 2old country. America has absorbed our whole being. But ask the old man,who arrived with the first immigrants, and you will hear he has not forgotten one relative or friend in the old country.

    Well, my Cicerone belongs to the old veterans. He came here in 1850.

    "Do you see that house," he says, showing me a fine public building. "There stood a little shack when I came here. We lived there all of us, thirty persons. What did we do? Well, we did what we could. We sawed wood, we worked on the farms around here for twenty five cents a day and meals, but we were out of work for long periods. Were we disheartened? Oh, no. Our wives were brave. When we men had nothing to do, we stayed home and took care of the children. Then the women went out working in homes, which could afford to pay for laundry work or house work. We had to be satisfied, and be very careful with what little we had."

    It was now twilight, both for the old man and for nature. I saw a strong 3electric light ahead of me, which came from a large factory. I asked the old man, "who is the owner of this factory?" "Well", he answered me," one of those boys who came over with us from Sweden made an invention and now they are working there day and night with 150 machines." Ah, I thought my countrymen have gone forward during these thirty years. They have made an important invention and built a large factory.

    I was informed later on during the evening that out of the small colony of thirty people a large settlement had grown up, and that there were now about 4,500 persons. Most of them had their own comfortable homes, half a dozen factories, giving work to hundreds of men, many churches, where thousands of worshipers assembled every Sunday, and that there are a dozen stores, selling different kinds of merchandise.... All are doing well.

    Time has been kind to this small city among these our countrymen, and so it is to all throughout America, where there is will power, courage, and willingness to do hard work.

    4

    There has been quite a beginning in every field of endeavor. There has been in some directions hardly any progress, but, nevertheless a little. Step by step we have moved onward until we are getting settled on the American soil.

    I walked the other day with an old Swedish-American in one of the more prosperous Swedish colonies some one-hundred miles from Chicago. We were talking about the old and the ...

    Swedish
    III G
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- January 11, 1884
    [Political Standard Bearers or Boosters]

    "Among many workers the view still prevails that the welfare of their class depends on the 'Democratic Party', that this party in opposition to the Republican party is the people's party- Do these nearsighted, misled wage slave still believe in this stupid idea-after the Ohio Democrats sold the U. S. Senate seat to the larges monoply, the Standard Oil Co.? Nearsighted men consider the Democratic party as the people's party; in other states the Republican party enjoys this preference.

    The secret is simply this: Where the Republican party is dominant the Democrats pretend to be the friends of the people, exploiting the peoples' suffering for their selfish purposes.

    The same role is played by the Republicans wherever the Democrats are in the majority. The game is to old and has been repeated so many times that only the most thickheaded and stupid people fall into the trap.--But 2unfortunately there are still plenty of this species left in the country.----

    "Among many workers the view still prevails that the welfare of their class depends on the 'Democratic Party', that this party in opposition to the Republican party is the people's ...

    German
    I E, I D 1 a
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- January 12, 1884
    [Johanna Lodge]

    The great dramatic and musical evening performance which the "Johannah Lodge" is giving for the benefit of poor children will take place in Brand's Hall tomorrow evening.

    In the musical program, Mr. L. A. Phelps, Miss Rae Rosenberg and Mrs. I. C. Stein are participating while the dramatic part which consists of the one act comedy "Who is to Win Him?" will be performed by Messrs. G. B. Danncona, S. T. de Lee, Milton J. Foreman, Miss Hattie Spiegel, Miss Addie Greenebaum, Miss Therese Frank and Miss Laura Hay.

    The great dramatic and musical evening performance which the "Johannah Lodge" is giving for the benefit of poor children will take place in Brand's Hall tomorrow evening. In the musical ...

    German
    II D 10, II B 1 c 1, III B 2, II D 1