The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- January 02, 1884
    German-American Girl's School 605-607 N. Clark Sts.

    This Institute accepts at all times pupils for the Elementary, Middle and Upper Classes. Special classes in German, French, Italian (under direction of Signora de Rudi) drawing, painting, embroidery and Elocution are now forming.

    This Institute accepts at all times pupils for the Elementary, Middle and Upper Classes. Special classes in German, French, Italian (under direction of Signora de Rudi) drawing, painting, embroidery and ...

    German
    II B 2 f, III A
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- January 02, 1884
    [Subscribe!! Subscribe!!]

    To Truth Revolutionary organ for the English speaking workman of America, a voice for the interests of the oppressed; a banner for the organized proletariat, a lance for the fighter in the revolutionary struggle.---

    Subscription price $2.00 per year, paid in advance.

    Burnette C. Haskell, editor,

    Chas F. Burgman,Manager, 916 Valencia Street, San Francisco, Cal.

    Agent for Chicago, Henry Webeking, 456 Milwaukee Avenue.

    To Truth Revolutionary organ for the English speaking workman of America, a voice for the interests of the oppressed; a banner for the organized proletariat, a lance for the fighter ...

    German
    II B 2 d 1, I E
  • Svenska Tribunen -- January 02, 1884
    Swedish Progress in America

    Editorial: At the end of a year and the beginning of a new year one likes to know what the nation has accomplished during the past year. Have we gone backward or forward? And what has taken place among us Swedish-Americans in this respect?

    It would be interesting to know how they try to make their living now compared, lets us say, to twenty years ago.

    If we believe the newspapers in Sweden in regard to the Swedes in America, and their work, there is nothing pleasant to talk about at all but, fortunately, these papers are not hostile to the Swedish-Americans, or no authority on these matters. They look at us through their prejudiced glasses, but that doesn't matter. We know that we are all right, that we have nothing to regret but much to be thankful for.

    2

    Let us go back to 1863, twenty years, since that time of hard work, sacrifice and suffering!. Every year in spite of hardships has been a year of victory. It has been a slow but steadfast walk from poverty to prosperity.

    The Swedish pioneers consisted of poor people almost without any means, who settled themselves on the prairies far away from civilized places. They had to put up a hard struggle to make a living.

    The Nordic strength did not fail, because it was a fight for life or death, where every nerve and muscle were strained.

    If we recall how things looked among the colonists in Illinois, Iowa and Minnesoat twenty years ago, if we had the opportunity to visit them now we would be surprised, and would gladly admit that these pioneers of the West have not lived in vain. They have been faithful to the high mission of sowing the seeds of civilization in places where the Indians and the buffaloes had been

    3

    making their abode. In short, the Swedish-American settlements, which now are spread out in a dozen large states and territories, show pictures of cultivation and prosperity, bearing witness to hard honest work.

    We do not say this to flatter anybody. We present it to show that the fate of the Swedes in this country doesn't call for tears or lamentations, but a glad hymn to Him who leadeth the destines of the people. The same statement can be applied to cities where the Swedes are making their living. It is true that workers, merchants, and the wage earners have to work hard and diligent to keep what they have or to get a stronger foothold,but,generally their lives are running in an undisturbed pattern.

    Sweden ought therefore to be proud of these facts. When they at home are rejoicing that Sweden is growing in peace, that Providence is giving them abundance, they ought not to forget, that the New Sweden on this side of the ocean is growing just as fast in peace and that the same Providence is giving to us, also.

    Editorial: At the end of a year and the beginning of a new year one likes to know what the nation has accomplished during the past year. Have we gone ...

    Swedish
    III H, I L, I C, III G
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- January 02, 1884
    [Cigarmakers' Ball]

    First annual Ball by the Cigarmakers' Progressive Union No. 15 of Chicago. Saturday, January 5, 1884, in the Nordseite Turnhalle.

    First annual Ball by the Cigarmakers' Progressive Union No. 15 of Chicago. Saturday, January 5, 1884, in the Nordseite Turnhalle.

    German
    I D 2 a 2
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- January 02, 1884
    From the North Side.

    The Socialist club of the North side held its agitation meeting last Saturday night, at which Comrade Schnaubelt presided. Comrade Wilhelm Lange reviewed in short the important happenings of last week. He said: "It is regrettable that the oppressed people of Ireland are still strong believers of the church, as it was evident at the demonstration of the Catholic church there.

    Instead of annihilating the disgraceful contrivers of oppression, the priests recommend thanking "God" for everything received, slavery included, and the flock does not perceive that it is this black-robed riff-raff of humanity who joining the oppressors, are responsible for existing conditions". He then spoke of Germany and condemned the ways of the Frankfort police during the funeral of our deceased Comrade Rudolf Doll who, throughout his life fought valiantly for the interests of the proletariat.

    Then he spoke of the Socialist Labor party's Congress at Baltimore regretting that they still expect salvation from the election nuisance, (When everybody else is convinced to the contrary) but hopes, that enlightenment will come to those men too.

    2

    "It is pleasant to report on the wide-spread sale of Henry George's work "Progress and Poverty'! That a good deal of propaganda has been spread with this popular writing among farmers, especially in Texas as is shown by the shouts of the Chicago "Times".

    Comrade Lange concluded by reproaching the Staats Zeitung for stirring up feeling against the Irish, and remarked that it was up to us to take stand against a few of the good-for-nothing Irish; branding the oppressors and enemies of the people.

    It was decided therefore, to instruct the delegates to the general committee, to join the Socialists of the North-west side in calling an Irish and German mass meeting to protest against such intolerance.

    3

    The new club has a membership of 27 already. As there was no other business on the calendar the meeting was postponed till next Sunday on which day Gen. Reiser is going to speak.

    Let's hope that all members, their friends and their women folks will be present in order to increase the number of fighters."

    The Socialist club of the North side held its agitation meeting last Saturday night, at which Comrade Schnaubelt presided. Comrade Wilhelm Lange reviewed in short the important happenings of last ...

    German
    I E, I C, III H, III C, II B 2 g
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- January 02, 1884
    Notice Editorial on Depression of 1884

    Criticism of the Chicago Times which declared that although the Depression is not as serious as the panic of 1873, we find ourselves in the midst of an industrial and commercial crisis. The Times attributed the depression to overproduction and speculation. The solution for the workingmen according to the latter lay in a return to the soil instead of remaining in the cities. The Arbeiter Zeitung is Sarcastic.

    "An excellant solution! The industrial workingmen will leave the production of their many years of labor to the big capitalist! Let the workingmen go as tramps and let themselves be exploited by the great landlords and only in this way can the economic system be righted."

    Criticism of the Chicago Times which declared that although the Depression is not as serious as the panic of 1873, we find ourselves in the midst of an industrial and ...

    German
    I H, I E, I D 2 c, I D 1 a
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- January 03, 1884
    [The Cigarmakers' Union]

    The Progressive Union of the local Cigarmakers, which was founded only lately, and as the name implies represents the progressive element of this trade, is holding its first entertainment and Ball in the North Side Turnhalle next Saturday evening. The Union deserves the assistance of all progessive workingmen, the more because they just emerged victoriously from a hard fight with the reactionary element.

    We strongly recommend the attendance to our friends.

    The Progressive Union of the local Cigarmakers, which was founded only lately, and as the name implies represents the progressive element of this trade, is holding its first entertainment and ...

    German
    I D 2 a 2
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- January 03, 1884
    [Socialist Meeting]

    The Club "Freiheit" held its regular business meeting yesterday evening. Comrade Selger presided. Comrade Machalski was elected Comptroller. After business matters were disposed of Comrade Machalski spoke about weekly events. He referred to the article of the "Times" about the bricklayers and attacked the capitalistic press for their infamy towards the workers. Machalski supplemented the views of the speaker.

    Inclosing Comrade Kabbitz criticized the Baltimore Congress and said that the workingmen would find out that the elections are based on swindle only.------

    The Club "Freiheit" held its regular business meeting yesterday evening. Comrade Selger presided. Comrade Machalski was elected Comptroller. After business matters were disposed of Comrade Machalski spoke about weekly events. ...

    German
    I E, I F 6, II B 2 g
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- January 03, 1884
    German Theatre in Mc Vickers'

    Georg Isenstein-----Director.

    Sunday, January 6, 1884- Upon popular "Margarethl und Faustling" Burlesque operetta in five scenes by I. Sixtus; Music by Conductor, I. Hopp.

    Dozen ticket books are sold by Phillip Henrici, 177 Madison Street, Wm Henrici, 117 Randolph Street, Emil Greifenhagen, Cigar Store, 153 Randolph Street and by Messrs. L. Wurlich, 39 N. Clark Streets; Seats may be reserved from Thursday 10 AM. on to Sunday from 1 PM. and evenings from 6:30 PM.

    Begins 8:30.

    Georg Isenstein-----Director. Sunday, January 6, 1884- Upon popular "Margarethl und Faustling" Burlesque operetta in five scenes by I. Sixtus; Music by Conductor, I. Hopp. Dozen ticket books are sold by ...

    German
    II A 3 b
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- January 03, 1884
    [Aurora Turnverein]

    "Report of the 1st speaker for the period from July 1883 to January 1884"

    Meetings were well attended. There were admitted 100 new members and the Aurora Turnverein with a membership of 240 is the second largest in the Chicago area,--- Financial Condition:-

    Implements repairs on the place $154.50
    Sick benefit 76.00
    Salary of instructors & benefits 410.00
    Singing section 67.00
    Library 30.00
    737.50

    Besides regular expenses for printing, rent, gas etc., there was a surplus of $64.00 so that the treasurer has at present $650.00 this should be added outstanding loans of $700.00. further securities represent almost $600.00 therefore altogether nearly $2000.00. Our library contains almost 600 books, and the library committee has added $120.00. Our boarding school which in 2January, 1883 had an attendance of 290 today boasts of 340 pupils among them 106 girls." ( Complaint that visitors are few )

    The 3rd and newest section under direction of August Zapp consists of a fencing group. We regret that it was impossible to start an elementary school, but I hope it will soon materialize.--

    "Report of the 1st speaker for the period from July 1883 to January 1884" Meetings were well attended. There were admitted 100 new members and the Aurora Turnverein with a ...

    German
    II B 3, II B 2 a, II B 2 f