The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Skandinaven -- January 03, 1883
    Elevators

    We have mentioned time and time again the danger of elevators or hoisting apparatus used in our hotels and downtown buildings. These contraptions are for lazy people who do not want to walk up a couple of flights of stairs.

    Every so often we hear of an elevator falling three or four stories to the basement of a building, usually resulting in death and destruction.

    Recently there have been many accidents, some of them fatal to a number of people, and many of our countrymen have [been crippled or lost their lives]. What can be done about this situation. Rigid inspection, fines for owners of buildings where such accidents occur because of negligence or the removal of these death boxes.

    We have mentioned time and time again the danger of elevators or hoisting apparatus used in our hotels and downtown buildings. These contraptions are for lazy people who do not ...

    Norwegian
    I H
  • Svenska Tribunen -- January 03, 1883
    Swedish Concert.

    The Freja Choral Society gave a concert last Saturday night at Turner Hall on the North Side in the presence of four hundred people. The program was well chosen.

    Waldemar Torssel from Boston, pianist, played one of his own compositions, Polka di concerto. Miss Lehder and Mr. Pallin sang the duetto from Figaros Wedding .

    The Freja Chorus sang and then everybody present was invited to dance which lasted until the early hours of the morning.

    The Freja Choral Society gave a concert last Saturday night at Turner Hall on the North Side in the presence of four hundred people. The program was well chosen. Waldemar ...

    Swedish
    II B 1 a
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- January 05, 1883
    The Turners.

    Mr. Legner, the first speaker at last night's meeting, gave a very satisfactory report. He said that the Aurora Turn-Society made progress during the past six months, surprising even to the members. The attendance at the meetings was very good and the participation in debates exceedingly spirited. The growing membership is looked upon with much satisfaction. January 4th, 1882, the Society had 105 members; today the list of members shows an increase to 150. The library disposes of 650 books. There are 319 pupils enlisted at the Turn school. August Zapp is turn teacher. Mr. Zapp can justly be proud of his accomplishments despite the difficulties which he encounters. The Turners and the Germans of the North-west side are appreciative of his work. I expressed my opinion in the last report that compulsory exercises were against our principles and harmful to the Society and have been proven correct. These paragraphs were suspended last July for a period of six months with a satisfying result. My advice to the Turn-Society is to abolish entirely the paragraphs for compulsory exercises. We propose that at the end of every meeting a few articles from the "Freidenker" (Free thinker) shall be read. This for the mental relaxation of the Turners and also to introduce to our new members, Turner Boppe, who is the excellent manager of this newspaper. On one of those occasions, Peter J. Ellert lectured on the hero Garibaldi. This was followed 2by a debate of much interest in which many of the turners participated.

    Turner August Spies gave at the December meeting a lecture on "Socialism and the Right of Women to vote". At the District Turn celebration at Ottawa our turners were awarded great honors. The six turners who composed a champion team, were awarded seven prizes. This was a great honor, indeed, inasmuch as there was hardly any time for preparation and not one of the members of the team had ever before participated at a turn festival.

    Mr. Legner, the first speaker at last night's meeting, gave a very satisfactory report. He said that the Aurora Turn-Society made progress during the past six months, surprising even to ...

    German
    II B 3, IV, II B 2 d 1
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- January 06, 1883
    [Cafe Owners Meet]

    The Chicago Inn-keepers Society met last night at Prager's Hall. The function of President fell to Mr. Berger. The meeting was well attended. After the regular business routine Mr. Harry Rubens was again appointed attorney for the Society. Thereafter, the "high license" question was brought up for discussion. It was proposed to join the Citizens Society, but this did not meet with approval. Carl Herzog proposed to appoint a committee of five persons whose duty it would be to agitate for the retention of present license fee. This was accepted and Messrs. Joseph Mickle, Carl Herzog, John Feldkamp, John Rheinwald and Cornelius Hau appointed members of the committee. It was suggested that inn-keepers provide their customers with printed orders for liquors which shall be used in case a minor was sent for it. Joseph Mickle proposed to discuss the increasing price of beer.

    Some maintained, and some denied, that it was due to an anti-German feeling on the part of some of the brewers. No definite action was decided upon. Mr. Oster proposed in conclusion not to pay over $8.00 per barrel of beer, which was unanimously accepted.

    The Chicago Inn-keepers Society met last night at Prager's Hall. The function of President fell to Mr. Berger. The meeting was well attended. After the regular business routine Mr. Harry ...

    German
    II A 2, IV, I B 1
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- January 08, 1883
    The Southside Socialists.

    The Koster Hall on Wentworth Avenue was the place of their meeting. The activities of the Southside Comrades deserve fullest appreciation, they have done a great deal toward the strengthening of the Socialists. The following officers were elected: Comrade Muller to the Central Committee, Comrade Stolle for the Protocol, Comrade Nothdurft Secretary of Finances and Comrade Thieme, Auditor.

    Comrade Rau spoke on present day questions and devoted considerable time to agitator Most, reading a few excerpts from his pamphlet:"Tactics versus Freedom."

    Following Mr. Rau on the speakers platform was Comrade Uhlhorn Sr., who expressed himself in accord with Mr. Rau although he differed with him on a few points.

    The Koster Hall on Wentworth Avenue was the place of their meeting. The activities of the Southside Comrades deserve fullest appreciation, they have done a great deal toward the strengthening ...

    German
    I E, II B 2 g
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- January 10, 1883
    The Sharp-Shooting Society of North Chicago.

    At the annual meeting by Conrad Folz yesterday the following report was read: The Society's present membership is 174 and The Finances are in good shape. The Sharp-Shooters Park and the additional buildings are property of the Society which represents a capital of at least $85,000 of which we owe $20,000 in mortgages.

    Following is the list of the newly elected officers: Wilhelm Schulz, President, Conrad Hibbecke, Vice-President, H. R. Zimpel, Secretary, Peter Herrer, Secretary of Finances, Henry Schmidt, Treasurer, N. M. Plothe, Managing Director, succeeding the departing Theodor Harz. Messrs. H. G. Prell and G. Merz Sharp-shooting Masters and, Messrs. Anton Imhof, John Keiser, Charles Folz, H. Giels-dorf and Magnus Kuh for the Finance Committee.

    At the annual meeting by Conrad Folz yesterday the following report was read: The Society's present membership is 174 and The Finances are in good shape. The Sharp-Shooters Park and ...

    German
    II B 3
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- January 11, 1883
    [The Turnverein Meeting]

    The Chicago Turn Community, reelected at the semi-annual meeting yesterday the following officers: Max Stern, first speaker, Lorenz Mattern, second speaker; Max Koelling, Protocol Secretaty; Claus D. Meyer, Corresponding Secretary; John E. Miller, Treasurer. Louis Nettlehorst, first secretary of the Turners and Edwin Schaefer second, Fritz Kohler, overseer of the gymnastic apparatus, Edmund Fieldler, cashier, Julius Rosenthal, Librarian and H. Suder, Turn-teacher. Mr. Max Stern gave a very satisfactory report on the school's progress and said the evening-school was attended by 52 adults during the past semester. He said also that owing to the efforts of a citizen's committee consisting of Messrs. A. Schoninger, H. J. Christoph and Albert Boese and to the support of the press, the second mortgage of $20,000 was paid off. The society has 65 active Turners.

    J. E. Miller the treasurer reported that the revenues were $2591.20 and the expenditures $1742.00. Secretary Max Koelling reported that 38 new members have joined the Society bringing the total to 326.

    The Chicago Turn Community, reelected at the semi-annual meeting yesterday the following officers: Max Stern, first speaker, Lorenz Mattern, second speaker; Max Koelling, Protocol Secretaty; Claus D. Meyer, Corresponding Secretary; ...

    German
    II B 3, II B 2 f
  • Skandinaven -- January 13, 1883
    The Milwaukee Fire

    James F. Gilleland, a Norwegian of this city, lost two sons [in the Milwaukee fire]. We say again that we must take warning [from this catastrophe].

    James F. Gilleland, a Norwegian of this city, lost two sons [in the Milwaukee fire]. We say again that we must take warning [from this catastrophe].

    Norwegian
    IV
  • Skandinaven -- January 18, 1883
    The Scandinavian Bank

    The closed Scandinavian bank owned by the Danes, Skow-Peterson, Isberg and Co., will now pay twenty-five per cent.

    We anticipate that this is just one of many future crashes.

    The closed Scandinavian bank owned by the Danes, Skow-Peterson, Isberg and Co., will now pay twenty-five per cent. We anticipate that this is just one of many future crashes.

    Danish
    I D 1 b
  • Skandinaven -- January 22, 1883
    The Railroads

    A twenty-five year old brakeman, Albert Johnson, was crippled for life because of the "link one pin coupling" in use on all railroad cars. The link and pin coupling should be replaced by the new improved coupling that assures the brakemen of much more safety than the old style.

    The railroads should be forced by law to install all the new equipment possible to promote safety.

    In 1882 hundreds of workers were killed because the railroads believed that human life was cheaper than up-to-date equipment.

    Our State Legislature should pass laws to protect the workers.

    A twenty-five year old brakeman, Albert Johnson, was crippled for life because of the "link one pin coupling" in use on all railroad cars. The link and pin coupling should ...

    Norwegian
    I H, I D 1 a