The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

Filter by Date

  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- January 03, 1881
    German Theatre-Mc Vickers.

    The farce, "Runaway Women" by Berla was played yesterday before a full house. the principal actress was, without doubt the excellent "Viennese Soubrette, Miss Pagay, who at her first appearance has gained the favor of the public. In yesterday's performance she showed her supremacy as a Soubrette of first rank. Attractive comic songs, a beautiful voice, splendid acting, ability, highly seasoned but not excessive, had their deserved effect. She was well supported by all the other actors and actresses. The harmony and ensemble was a rarely achieved result, but local artists did not take a back seat when playing with such a great star as Miss Pagay. They seemed to be incited to a superb performance.

    The production was in every sense a master piece.

    The farce, "Runaway Women" by Berla was played yesterday before a full house. the principal actress was, without doubt the excellent "Viennese Soubrette, Miss Pagay, who at her first appearance ...

    German
    II A 3 d 1
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- January 04, 1881
    The Singer's Festival

    The serious-work for the next great Singer's and Musicians Festival starts now. The claims which are made for the great Singer's festival, generally, and especially for the Chicago ore, are such that only by cooperation of the best forces can a satisfactory result be gained. For this reason we invite all singers and songs-tresses of Chicago to join without delay, the newly formed Chicago Festival Chorus, which will hold rehearsals every Friday evening at 8 o'clock in the Methodist Church, corner S. Clark and Washington Street. The diflulties of the compositions to be enacted make a longer period of rehearsals necessary and the list of participants will be closed the end of January.

    A good musical herring and knowledge of musical notes is necessary for joining the Chorus. Applications can be made daily from 9 to 12 A. M. and 2 to 5 P.M. in the office of H. Balatka, Mamagar, 110 Randolph Street, Room 5.

    The serious-work for the next great Singer's and Musicians Festival starts now. The claims which are made for the great Singer's festival, generally, and especially for the Chicago ore, are ...

    German
    II B 1 c 3, II B 1 a
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- January 05, 1881
    [German in the Public Schools]

    Even 4,00 School children taking German lessons in a city like Chicago, with 130,000 Germans is still very little. Amongst this number are many children of speculative American business men, who let their children learn German out of business considerations.

    However, the German language has broken the ice in the public schools and there will be no danger that it will be suppressed as it seemed very likely with the previous Committee last Spring.

    Even 4,00 School children taking German lessons in a city like Chicago, with 130,000 Germans is still very little. Amongst this number are many children of speculative American business men, ...

    German
    I A 1 b
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- January 05, 1881
    The German Language Taught in Public Schools.

    The following report of the Supervisors of the German School Lessons, Dr. Zimmerman to Mr. John C. Richberg, President of the School Committee for the German Lessons at Public Schools is more active and effective than the previous one.

    To Mr. Richberg, Chairman of the Committee, I give the statistical report of the position of the German Lessons during the period July to December, 1880:- On June 30th the German language was taught in 20 grammar schools and 4 High Schools, the number of pupils was 2,567, the number of teachers 21. During the last half yearly period German Lessons have been introduced at 8 new schools, "The Jones", "Nickersonville," "Raymond", "Marquette", "Clark", "Douglas", "Wicker Park" and "Burr School." There remains only 6 grammar schools in town where the German language is not taught. The following index gives the names of the schools, the number of pupils in the grammar schools, the number taking part in German Lessons, and the number of teachers:-

    2
    Schools Total Pupils Total Pupils taking German Lessons Teachers of German
    Scammon 184 65 1
    Kinzie 325 135 1
    Franklin 565 277 2
    Washington 134 51 1
    Mosely 654 363 2
    Bronst 636 195 1
    Ogden 451 200 2
    Newsberry 175 127 1
    Wells 284 138 1
    Akinner 321 70 1
    Haven 282 155 1
    Cottage Grove 165 62 1
    Douglas 295 162 1
    Lincoln 239 182 1
    Carpenter 101 45 1
    King 318 89 1
    No, Clark 131 68 1
    Foster 486 293 1
    3
    Pickard 94 64 1
    Jones 193 138 1
    Nickersonville 97 84 1
    Raymond 152 82 1
    Marquette 359 61 1
    Clarke 275 214 1
    Douglas 385 162 1
    6294 3399 28

    The Wicker Park and Burr Schools will, after a resolution of December 20th, 1880, introduce German lessons.

    The total number of all pupils in the 25 schools December 31st, 1880, is 6294, the number of German pupils 3399. The number of pupils in the High Schools are 1132 of which 257 participate in German lessons. This totals 7426 pupils of which 257 participate in German lessons about 50%. By the rule of 20 4in several classes in 13 of the 25 schools, 979 pupils are prevented from learning the German language.

    If this rule was not in force about 1/3 (326) of these pupils would participate in the German lessons. January 3rd, 1881 an increase of 330 pupils is expected, whereto must be added the pupils of the 2 new schools, Wicker Park and Burr which would make a total of 4000.

    Dr. G. F. Zimmerman

    Superintendent of the German Lessons.

    The following report of the Supervisors of the German School Lessons, Dr. Zimmerman to Mr. John C. Richberg, President of the School Committee for the German Lessons at Public Schools ...

    German
    I A 1 b, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 07, 1881
    The German Theatre

    Last night's performance of Suppe's "Fatinitza" was produced by the Collner-Isenstein Theatre company at the Mc Vicker Theatre. It was a rare occurrence indeed, that every seat in the house was occupied. It was unanimously agreed that this was the best Fatinitza production ever brought before the Chicago public. And if this includes the exponent of the principal role also, then we join heartily in the praise. Miss Pagay was simply adorable as "Fatinitza." There were unquestionably better singers heard before in the title role, but for her dramatic talent, Miss Pagay cannot be surpassed. She was exquisite throughout the play, but the climax was reached in the third act when she appeared in the smart uniform of a Hussar officer. A thunderous applause interrupted the performance.

    The character of "Lydia"was impersonated by Miss Wassmann, and the least we 2can say about her is that she was one among the best interpreters of the role ever heard in Chicago so far.

    Mr. Waldorf, as "General Kantschukoff," could have done more justice to his role. The war correspondent played by Mr. Wassermann, known as that ardent and devoted exponent of dramatic art, surprised us very pleasantly. Never before had Chicagoans the opportunity to see that part characterized so splendidly.

    Mr. Heinemann as "Pascha" was rather disappointing. Because this is the most piquant of all the male characters of the opera, much more was expected of him, and rightly so. What he did offer was mediocre indeed!

    Last night's performance of Suppe's "Fatinitza" was produced by the Collner-Isenstein Theatre company at the Mc Vicker Theatre. It was a rare occurrence indeed, that every seat in the house ...

    German
    II A 3 b, II A 3 d 1
  • The Occident -- January 07, 1881
    Jewish Congregations Anshia Emeth

    Anshia Emeth (Men of Truth) Congregation was chartered two years ago last May. The congregation leased the second floor of 262 Division Street, West Clark which has a seating capacity of 300, and where they now worship. The room is handsomely fitted up in oak and contains all the paraphernalia of a nice temple.

    Mr. Bernheim, a layman, has officiated as minister, assisted by members of the congregation, since its organization. There are at present thirty-one members worshipping in the orthodox manner and using the Minhag Poland. This congregation has no Sabbath School at present. Their burial ground is located on the Harlem Road, which consists of one acre, 888 feet in depth, 253 ¾ feet in width running from the east to the west with a tasteful picket fence inclosing it; it has also a Mithar house, which costed $900. This is paid in full. The cost of burial for a grown a person is $10; children $5. The organization does not belong to the Y. A. H. C.

    The congregation embodies a Benevolent Society and its President is empowered to donate to distressed bretheren $3, but in extreme cases when desirable he has the privilege of calling a meeting of the Committee, and they can donate $10 which is the limit. The congregation gives $5 to members in case of illness besides other stipends. The monthly dues are seventy-five cents.

    Anshia Emeth (Men of Truth) Congregation was chartered two years ago last May. The congregation leased the second floor of 262 Division Street, West Clark which has a seating capacity ...

    Jewish
    III C, V B, I B 4
  • Der Westen -- January 09, 1881
    An Orphan's Home

    To call a person charitable is a fine tribute paid to the one devoted to the alleviation of the suffering of humanity. But nothing can be nobler than to take the place of father of mother to the little orphans, and rear and rear and guide them all through childhood until they too are ready to take their places in the outside world. This is exactly the work the management of the German-Catholic orphanage in Rosehill has announced to do. Various German-Catholic communities throughout Chicago have adopted this humane system of caring for orphaned children ten years ago. Considering the comparatively short period since the original orphanage of Rosehill was built, and the fact that that structure was destroyed by fire, Oct. 26, 1879, it is highly commendable indeed, that they have not lost any time to erect a new orphan asylum, surpassing in excellence the building consumed by the flames.... Imposing ceremonies preceded the opening of the orphanage last Thursday.

    The home is built to accomodate 300 children. Among the fifty-six boys and 2forty girls in the home now, are also twenty foundlings. The management of the institution is entrusted to an Administrative Council, which is chosen by the seven Catholic communities, responsible for the erection and maintenance of this home. But the sisters, known as servants of Christ, are the direct managers of the home. The headquarters of their organization are in Gernbach, near Coblenz on the Rhine.

    Children placed in this German-Catholic institution remain there until after they have received first communion. Thereafter, they are placed in private homes, but remain under the guardianship of the Orphan's Home until they reach maturity.

    Inasmuch as the new building is very spacious, the sisters have taken upon themselves still greater responsibilities, namely, to take in, and care for, motherless infants, although the father may be living. Many a young widower, finding himself in just such a predicament, will hail this excellent opportunity offered to him by the sisters to give the child proper care and rearing.

    3

    After the simple but impressive dedication ceremonies were concluded, the installation of the newly elected officials took place. They are: Pater Essing, from the St. Michaels community, president; C. Wenn, pastor of St. Bonifacius Church is vice-president; Adam L. Amberg is treasurer; and Lorenz Biehl, secretary.

    The building is equipped with all the latest modern comforts....

    To call a person charitable is a fine tribute paid to the one devoted to the alleviation of the suffering of humanity. But nothing can be nobler than to take ...

    German
    II D 4, III C
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- January 16, 1881
    Arbeiter Halle.

    The Polandische Company brought last evening the beloved play to the stage entitled "The Embarrassment of a Married Man." (Ein Ehemann in der Klemme). Following this play the company presented the musical comedy from Moser, "Seaman's Homecoming." (Seemanns Heimkehr.)

    Is as much as this was received with enormous applause, the company closed with another musical comedy, "The Educated Cook." ( Eine gebildete Koechin).

    In as much as the admission was only 15¢ the House, as was expected, was filled to capacity.

    The Polandische Company brought last evening the beloved play to the stage entitled "The Embarrassment of a Married Man." (Ein Ehemann in der Klemme). Following this play the company presented ...

    German
    II A 3 d 1
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- January 16, 1881
    German Theatre

    Last Saturday evening, the comedy, "The Runaway Wives," was presented at the Schiller Theatre.

    The material with which the director and the cast had to deal was mighty poor. In fact, the comedy was more a copy of America's "Old Toms" or "Old Joes."

    Likewise, the music was bad. Surprising that the music director would ask capable musicians to play such silly pieces. The composition was simply very poor.

    Last Saturday evening, the comedy, "The Runaway Wives," was presented at the Schiller Theatre. The material with which the director and the cast had to deal was mighty poor. In ...

    German
    II A 3 d 1
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- January 16, 1881
    "Lumpaci Vagabundus Volks Theatre"

    Last evening Mr. Sarner presented the comedy Lumpaci Vagabundus" at the Volks Theatre. The comedy has been on the program of the German Theatre, for over a half century. The comedy was under the capable direction of Mr. Sarner, who although manager-director took a part last evening.

    At the end of the evening a one act comedy was presented by the same company entitled "Dont Paint The Devil On The Wall". "Man Soll den Teufel nicht An Die Wand Malen".

    There is no question but, that the evening was a most successful one in every respect.

    Last evening Mr. Sarner presented the comedy Lumpaci Vagabundus" at the Volks Theatre. The comedy has been on the program of the German Theatre, for over a half century. The ...

    German
    II A 3 d 1