The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- January 02, 1880
    German Theatre

    Last night, the German people were entertained by Mr. Hochster in the North side Turnhalle with the comedy "Bummelfritz" same being played two weeks at Mc Vicker's Theatre with great success. The Northside Turnhalle was filled to the last seat and great applause was given. After the show the people danced in the New Year, and all had a very pleasant and joyful new year's eve.

    On Sunday theatrical director Hochster played the tragedy "Magda", by Madame Irschick of the Munchener Hoftheatre, in one of her star roles as Johanna in Schiller's "Jungfrau von Orleans." Tickets at the box office are in great demand, and it is advisable to buy your tickets at once. Fraulien Irschick arrived last night and registered at the Palmer House, where she expects to have her rehearsal.

    It is a very welcome program and we are sure all will enjoy it very much.

    Last night, the German people were entertained by Mr. Hochster in the North side Turnhalle with the comedy "Bummelfritz" same being played two weeks at Mc Vicker's Theatre with great ...

    German
    II A 3 d 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 07, 1880
    The Ladies' Aid of the German Society

    The members of the executive committee of the Ladies' Aid Society, a branch of the German Society, passed the following resolution yesterday:

    "The Ladies' Aid Society of the German Society hereby expresses its gratitude to all who gave gifts or otherwise helped to provide a Christmas festival for the poor children. The ladies particularly thank Mr. Brand for his courtesy in having provided free use of his hall, and are very grateful to the German press which gave publicity to the event in so liberal a manner, thus helping considerably in making the affair a success. Furthermore, we thank the various businessmen for the presents they contributed and their friendly interest; also the individuals whose donations enabled the Society to have a plentiful supply of everything for the occasion. The ladies also thank Mr. Bauer, who furnished a piano for the occasion, as well as Mrs. Huck, Mrs. Thorwarth, Miss Pick, and Mr. Schmoll, whose combined efforts made a success of the affair. In fact, we thank all who collaborated with us to make the affair a success.

    "An accounting will be submitted next Wednesday."

    The members of the executive committee of the Ladies' Aid Society, a branch of the German Society, passed the following resolution yesterday: "The Ladies' Aid Society of the German Society ...

    German
    II D 10, III B 3 b
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 09, 1880
    Know-Nothings Heaten Proponents of German Instruction Win

    The school board held its regular session yesterday. Inspector Brenan was the only absentee, and Stiles left before the meeting was adjourned. Adoption of a new kind of steam pump....leases.....

    German Instruction

    Mr. Vocke, a member of the school board, spoke about the petitions for German instruction at the Pickard and Foster schools and made a motion to grant the requests.

    Mr. Stone protested against the motion. In so far as the Pickard School was concerned, he said that the petition had not been signed by reputable citizens and parents, but by human derelicts such as one finds in dives and disreputable 2saloons, and for that reason Vocke's predecessor had denied it. He would have to protest against the petition unless proper evidence could be produced to show that the signatures were genuine. In regard to the Foster School Mr. Stone found there was no demand for German instruction and therefore he would also protest that petition. He made a motion to postpone both applications indefinitely.

    Mr. Vocke strongly objected to Mr. Stone's aspersions. He said the assertion that the petition was withdrawn by his predecessor was just as untrue as the accusation that the names were collected in dens, and the statement was slanderous; that Mr. Stone would not be able to prove this. If Mr. Stone happened to be opposed to German instruction, then he should be candid about it and not take recourse to falsehoods and baseless suspicions. The petition had been received by the school board a long time ago, giving Mr. Stone sufficient opportunity to investigate whether the signatures were admissible or not, but regardless of this, he stooped to vile insinuations.

    3

    Mr. Richberg proved by the minutes of the school board that Mr. Pruessing had not withdrawn the petition as Mr. Stone claimed, but on the contrary, had always objected to the board's deferring action whenever he mentioned the matter. Mr. Richberg was willing to assume full responsibility for the validity of the signatures appearing on the Pickard School petition. Nobody would have any interest in supplying fictitious names in behalf of German instruction. Mr. Stone's statement was on a par with the fantastic claims of an alleged German, in reality a Swiss adventurer, who said that only 2,000 children out of 50,000 wanted to study German, and that this subject in our schools was a political humbug.

    Mr. Richberg then showed, by referring to official figures, that nearly on half of the pupils who were given an opportunity to learn German enrolled in the course, in spite of the inhibitory rule that twenty pupils must apply before the subject is included in the curriculum, a provision which excludes hundreds from taking German instruction. It was a disgrace that the school 4board quoted the nonsense so glibly disseminated by a political adventurer, when the absurdity of it all was plainly apparent in the official records. Mr. Richberg said that he was fully aware that many members of the school board were opposed to German instruction and that they were bitterly disappointed because the "Rule of Twenty" excluded only two hundred children from the German classes instead of one thousand. He favored the German language study, and also singing and drawing in the public schools, because he considered them to be necessary subjects.

    Mr. Curran asserted that German lessons were a luxury which the people could not afford as long as we had 8,000 children who obtained only partial schooling and 7,000 pupils who were compelled to attend school in badly ventilated and unsanitary rented buildings.

    Mr. Stone insisted that the Pickard School petition was only humbug and that the signatures were fraudulent. Besides, it was a fact that participation in 5German instruction dropped fifty per cent during the last five years. The records showed that registration for German lessons had dropped in the lower grades; at the Newberry School, for instance, from five hundred to a mere one hundred.

    Mr. Richberg read the official report, showing that out of 198 pupils in the lower grades at the Newberry School, 119 were studying German. Mr. Stone did not react, but insisted that participation in German instruction was diminishing consistently, was on the verge of collapse, and like all sick people, required increasing expenditures each year. At present it costs three times more to teach a child German than to give tuition in reading, writing, and arithmetic. Mr. Richberg retorted, that every German teacher had one hundred pupils while the average in all other branches was fifty children for one teacher.

    Mr. Stone did not want to hear anything about it, so Inspector Keith 6interrupted him by making a motion for adjournment, but only Messrs. Keith and Frake favored it. Mr. Curran made a motion to continue with the agenda but the matter was declared out of order, whereupon a motion was offered to postpone the argument for an indefinite period; this was defeated, as follows:

    In favor: Messrs. English, Stone, Keith, Frake, Curran and Stensland.

    Opposed: Messrs. Vocke, Armstrong, Bartlett, Frankenthal, Delaney, Richberg and Hoyne.

    Encouraged by this result, Mr. Richberg succeeded in having the debate closed. Before the issue came to a vote, however, Mr. Stone objected and declared that a two thirds vote was necessary, but he was overruled.

    The motion to teach German in the two schools mentioned above passed, as the following vote indicated:

    7

    In favor: Messrs. Vocke, Keith, Armstrong, Bartlett, Frankenthal, Delaney, Richberg, and Hoyne.

    Opposed: Messrs. Stone, English, Frake, Curran, and Stensland.

    Absent: Messrs. Stiles and Brenan.

    Mr. Stone changed his vote, in order to make a motion for the reconsideration of the question, but Mr. Richberg forestalled him by making a motion of his own to reconsider the question; adding his motion to the previous motion, he asked that all motions be tabled. After a lengthy argument about the admissibility of the procedure, which Mr. Stone violently opposed, Mr. Richberg withdrew his second motion, which was then offered by Mr. Delaney. The motion passed as before, with no change in vote.

    Mr. Armstrong then made a motion that the City Council acquire a building site 8for a school in the vicinity of Indiana and St. Clair Streets. [Translator's note: Indiana Avenue apparently was called a street at that time.]

    The meeting then adjourned.

    The school board held its regular session yesterday. Inspector Brenan was the only absentee, and Stiles left before the meeting was adjourned. Adoption of a new kind of steam pump....leases.....

    German
    I A 1 b
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 09, 1880
    German Prohibitionists.

    Under the name of National German American Prohibition League a number of fanatical German prohibitionists organized a society. Yesterday, in Chicago, this group chose as its object to do all in its power to make prohibition a reality. Judging future prospects of these simpletons by their meeting, yesterday, which was arranged for the purpose of organizing the society, it can be predicted that this movement will fail sooner or later, since the attitude of the Germans towards prohibition is well-known, and they will not be effected by fanatical prohibitionists.

    There were hardly sufficient persons present to fill the places of officials. After a long battle of words the following officials were elected: H. Ricke, President; B. A. Eisener, of Wheaton, and J. H. Niz, 1st and 2nd Vice-Presidents; J. H. Reissman, Secretary; and C. G. Schultz, Treasurer.

    Under the name of National German American Prohibition League a number of fanatical German prohibitionists organized a society. Yesterday, in Chicago, this group chose as its object to do all ...

    German
    I B 2, III B 2
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- January 10, 1880
    Meeting of the German Section.

    The German Section of the Socialistic Workmen's Union held their regular business meeting, yesterday afternoon at 54 W. Lake Street. About 30 persons were present. With reference tothe amounts collected for deported Socialists, the existing committee has been instructed to communicate with authorized persons in New York and elsewhere as to where the money is meeded most urgently and to act accordingly. A reprimanded Socialist, who had must arrived in Chicago and was in great need, has received $8.00 from the Committee.

    The matter of a library was then discussed. A Committee has been elected, which should collect the books, index them and submit a plan at the next meeting for the formation of a library of Socialistic books accessible to everybody. The financial report read by the treasurer was very favorable. The selection of the officers was as follows:- Agent Gustav Bartels, Secretary: R. Dietzins, Financial Secretary; Kalina, Treasurer; Wm. Medow, auditors, H. Selle, Meritschke and Schmidt.

    The German Section of the Socialistic Workmen's Union held their regular business meeting, yesterday afternoon at 54 W. Lake Street. About 30 persons were present. With reference tothe amounts collected ...

    German
    I E, II D 10, III G, II B 2 a
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- January 13, 1880
    [Low-German Sick Benefit Society]

    A cheerful ball was held last Sunday in Albert Lorenz Vokshall on Cornell St. The Society had made a lodge for people who neither could nor would join lodges already in operation; hence this Lodge was to help such persons. The party was very interesting and entertained by Fritz Reuter Grote and Zumbuch--Comrade Ed Cook made short speech in his mother tongue.

    Later on all the young people enjoyed themselves by dancing, to tunes of a very fine orchestra.

    A cheerful ball was held last Sunday in Albert Lorenz Vokshall on Cornell St. The Society had made a lodge for people who neither could nor would join lodges already ...

    German
    II D 1, V A 1, III B 2
  • Svornost -- January 19, 1880
    Bohemian in the Public Schools Discussion of This Matter in Yesterday's Meeting

    The mass meeting held yesterday afternoon on the premises of J. Sedlack was not attended so well as the purpose of the meeting required.

    The meeting was brought to order at 3:30 P.M. by Leo Meilbek. Fr. Dvorak was elected Chairman and Mr. Fiala as secretary. Thereafter Mr. L. Meilbek read a speech in which he laid stress on the need for a halt in the constant organization of new Bohemian Lodges to the detriment of our public, but that those existing should be improved for the general good. In his speech he argues that all Lodges and individuals should join forces in order to secure the instruction of the Bohemian Language in our public schools, and first of all in the Throop Street School where over half the pupils are of Bohemian extraction. with this thought in mind the following resolution was accepted unanimously--

    We American Citizens of Bohemian descent gathered in mass meeting on the premises of Citizen Jos. Sedlack, corner morgan and 19th Street, adopt the following:

    2

    (1) We call upon and urgently request all Bohemian Benevolent Associations and Lodges, whether public or secret, that they require all persons seeking membership in organizations, to become citizens of the United States and that the present members of these lodges and associations should likewise become citizens, in order that we may work in unison to secure equal rights in the public schools of Chicago, so that the teaching of the Bohemian Language may be adopted as soon as possible.

    (2) We urge citizens to join Political Parties, for it is our duty to discuss the various political questions arising from time to time. We must necessarily have public meetings for this purpose, for everyone knows that the discussion of politics in the meetings of our various lodges and associations is not permitted.

    (3) There shall be elected at this meeting a committee (composed of as many members as are decided on by those present) for the purpose of securing signatures of all our Bohemian countrymen who would like to have the Bohemian Language taught in our public schools.

    3

    That a committee of two be selected at this meeting, who are capable of working out the details of this matter and together with the signed petitions to present it to the School Board and further that this committee shall do all that they consider proper and of benefit to this cause and they shall from time to time call meetings so as to report on the progress of this matter.

    Then so that the first step in the matter might be an accomplished fact the petition to the School Board was drawn up as follows:

    Chicago, Jan. 19th 1880

    To the Honorable Board of Education of the City of Chicago.

    Gentlemen:

    We, the undersigned parents and guardians of children attending the Throop School, would most respectfully petition your Honorable Board to introduce the study of the Bohemian Language in said school for the following reasons: There are now attending this school 430 pupils of Bohemian parentage or about one-half of the total attendance, and as your Honorable Board 4caused the German Language to be taught in several schools, we as citizens and taxpayers demand the same recognition as is accorded to other nationalities.

    Finally it was decided to hold another meeting at this same place next Wednesday night, to which meeting all parents who are sending children to the Throop School are urgently requested to come. At this meeting the committee for the circulation of the above petition will be elected. Mrs. L. Meilbek and M. Baumruker were appointed to the committee which is to take the question up with the School Board.

    The importance of yesterday's meeting and those to come is plainly evident. It is for the individuals now and for our various Lodges especially to do their part, for if the German people can have their Language taught in 18 of our public schools, why can't we Bohemians in those sections of the city inhabited mainly by us have our mother tongue taught in the public schools?

    The mass meeting held yesterday afternoon on the premises of J. Sedlack was not attended so well as the purpose of the meeting required. The meeting was brought to order ...

    Bohemian
    I A 1 b, I A 1 b, I C, III A, I F 2, II D 1
  • Svenska Tribunen -- January 21, 1880
    The First Swede in Chicago

    Gustave Flack is supposed to have been the first Swede who settled in Chicago in 1845 or 1846. He established himself as a merchant at the Clark Street bridge, which was the only one in the city at that time. He was born in the northern part of Sweden called Helsingland.

    He went back home to Sweden two years later to visit relatives, but died on the journey.

    He aroused interest among the people through his letters from America to Helsingland, Sweden. The result of this correspondence was the immigration of Eric Janson and the followers of Bishop Hill.

    Gustave Flack is supposed to have been the first Swede who settled in Chicago in 1845 or 1846. He established himself as a merchant at the Clark Street bridge, which ...

    Swedish
    III G
  • Svornost -- January 22, 1880
    Equal Obligations, Equal Rights Sign the Petition Bohemian in the Public School

    The decisive step has been taken and if it were not for the cursed indifference and sluggishness among us, we could know before tomorrow morning what kind of reception was given to our petition to the School Board, in regard to the teaching of the Bohemian Language in our Public Schools.

    It is to be regretted that, in view of very great importance of this matter, the personal interest of the greater portion of our countrymen remains unprecedentedly cold and indifferent. There is, no doubt, but that it was for this reason that the meeting which was held last night, in the interest of this generally known cause, was so little attended.

    The meeting was opened and presided over by Citizen Leo Meilbek. After the explanation of the purposes of this meeting, namely the selection of a committee for the securing of signatures to the petition. Mr. M. Baumruker gave a brief talk, pointing out the usefulness and benefits to be derived from the teaching of the Bohemian Language in the Public Schools, 2describing the convenience of the present time for the accomplishment of this purpose.

    "Let us give some thought to the Bohemian English (Liberal) School, even though it is sufficient for our purpose, still no one can deny that if the Bohemian Language were taught in the Public Schools it would be of great benefit to us for in the former, English is not studied so well as in the latter, and after all, English is the chief language here."

    Many bitter truths were spoken by our esteemed friend and all those present admit that he was right. It was brought out that some of our countrymen were opposed to the teaching of the Bohemian Language in the Public Schools, fearing that they would be forced to pay additional taxes for that purpose. To be sure they are very much mistaken. The appointment of an instructor of the Bohemian Language in the Public Schools will cause no increase in the tax levy upon Bohemians, because the estimated needs for school purposes are spread upon the entire city and each one is required to pay a certain sum, whether they have one, two, five or no teachers whatever and whether or not they send their children to school.

    3

    Supposing that the taxes were really increased because of this appointment of a Bohemian Teacher, who would receive about $600.00 yearly, how much increase would fall upon each citizen of the community, surely not over one cent before the entire amount would be made up. Let no one be frightened about this matter; the teaching of the Bohemian Language can be introduced into the school system without any additional outlay or expense to us. Let the parents who have children attending the Throop school sign the petition when it is presented to them and secure the signatures of their neighbors.

    The petition which was made public last Monday was to have been delivered to the School Board today, but owing to the lack of a sufficiently large number of signatures the presentation is postponed for two weeks.

    The committee appointed for the securing of signatures is as follows: Jan Poustecky and J. Sedlacek.

    Once more we wholeheartedly urge all our countrymen who have children attending the Throop School to see to it that the petition for the teaching of Bohemian have as many signatures as it is possible to get.

    The decisive step has been taken and if it were not for the cursed indifference and sluggishness among us, we could know before tomorrow morning what kind of reception was ...

    Bohemian
    I A 1 b, III C, I A 1 c, II B 2 f
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- January 22, 1880
    Lassalle!

    Who would not like to have the works of Lassalle, to which he subscribed, tastefully bound?

    Surely everybody.

    Beautiful covers red or brown can be had for the insignificant price of 30 cents for each piece, from Michael Schwab, 107 Fifth Avenue.

    Who would not like to have the works of Lassalle, to which he subscribed, tastefully bound? Surely everybody. Beautiful covers red or brown can be had for the insignificant price ...

    German
    II B 2 d 3