The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 13, 1879
    New Chicago Enterprises

    Yesterday's Tribune published an article on the Chicago Mining and Milling Company, a newly organized venture. We quote from their columns:

    "Among the most recent enterprises, we must add the one of our fellow citizen, H. C. Hesing. Our readers will undoubtedly remember his interesting letters from Arizona which were published in the Illinois Staats-Zeitung and reprinted in the Tribune."

    Yesterday's Tribune published an article on the Chicago Mining and Milling Company, a newly organized venture. We quote from their columns: "Among the most recent enterprises, we must add the ...

    German
    II A 2, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 13, 1879
    Elementary School

    The elementary school of the Chicago Turngemeinde (Gymnastic Community) was reopened on January 1. As is generally known, the school is conducted by Mr. Lang, an excellent instructor, whose success as a teacher is apparent to those who have watched the youngsters perform.

    We consider it our duty to inform the German people of the North Side that there is no better method of developing their children, mentally or physically, than by having them attend classes at this school.

    There the children are disciplined, exercised, and taught good posture and carriage. Many a puny child has been strengthened by exercise; many who have suffered from curvature of the spine have grown straight.

    We believe that parents are actually neglecting their duty if they fail to let their children participate in the classes of the gymnasium.

    The elementary school of the Chicago Turngemeinde (Gymnastic Community) was reopened on January 1. As is generally known, the school is conducted by Mr. Lang, an excellent instructor, whose success ...

    German
    II B 2 f, II B 3
  • Svornost -- January 13, 1879
    [New School Started]

    Last Sunday, in Chicago, there was started a new Sunday School to teach children the Bohemian language.

    The class room was fitted out by generous minded citizens of the 6th Ward. There was an immediate enrollment of (50) fifty children. Mr. August Geringer is the teacher.

    The Northwest side Sunday School, which is under the supervision of Mr. Reisla and Mr. Volenske is progressing rapidly and has bright prospects for the future.

    Last Sunday, in Chicago, there was started a new Sunday School to teach children the Bohemian language. The class room was fitted out by generous minded citizens of the 6th ...

    Bohemian
    II B 2 f, III A, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 13, 1879
    Chicago Mining and Milling Company (Advertisement)

    [Translator's note: A reprint of an article in the Illinois Staats-Zeitung of January 3, 1879. The above article, or more accurately, advertisement, has been previously translated. Please see the January 3, 1879, edition of the Illinois Staats-Zeitung. The company is a German-American concern founded by A. C. Hesing.]

    [Translator's note: A reprint of an article in the Illinois Staats-Zeitung of January 3, 1879. The above article, or more accurately, advertisement, has been previously translated. Please see the January ...

    German
    II A 2, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 14, 1879
    Chicago Mining and Milling Company (Advertisement)

    [Translator's note: Reprint of article. This is a Chicago German firm founded by A. C. Hesing. Article previously translated. Please see Illinois Staats-Zeitung, January 3 and January 13, 1879. The advertisement appears again on January 15 and January 16, 1879.]

    [Translator's note: Reprint of article. This is a Chicago German firm founded by A. C. Hesing. Article previously translated. Please see Illinois Staats-Zeitung, January 3 and January 13, 1879. The ...

    German
    II A 2, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 16, 1879
    The Chicago Mining and Milling Company What the English Press Says about the Enterprise

    The Evening Journal contains the following account of A. C. Hesing's corporation.....[Translator's note: Please see Evening Journal of the previous day, January 15, 1879. Since the article is available in English, it has not been translated.]

    The Inter-Ocean of Tuesday gives a lengthy account and states.....[Translator's note: Please see the Inter-Ocean of Tuesday, January 14, 1879.]

    The Evening Journal contains the following account of A. C. Hesing's corporation.....[Translator's note: Please see Evening Journal of the previous day, January 15, 1879. Since the article is available in ...

    German
    II A 2, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 16, 1879
    Drones (Editorial)

    What we have said....regarding the hoarded money of the wealthy people who invest their funds in four per cent securities instead of in commercial enterprises, has also found acceptance in the Inter-Ocean: "It is gratifying that the Government can sell ten million dollar's worth of four-per-cent bonds every few days. We are glad that Uncle Sam enjoys such good credit. However, we regret that the capitalists take such little interest in the rebuilding of our nation's economic welfare or in the rejuvenation of its trade....Unfortunately, the wealthiest people are the drones of society....They sit calmly in their castles--cutting coupons".....

    This sounds as if it were Socialist propaganda, but it is true, every word of it! Instead of having developed into a blessing for the persons of average, moderate income, our national debt which has now been converted into four per cent bonds, has become a detriment to the working class and a curse to the 2nation. It produces a class of lazy, retired gentlemen whose sole vocation consists of various games of cards, pleasure strolls, and coupon clipping; these gentlemen are the kind of capitalists who arouse the ire and righteous indignation of the unemployed and working classes of Europe. In this manner the consolidation of our national debt becomes a potent danger to our social order.

    Whereas it used to be thought that capital was a result of labor, and that capital, in turn, produced further valuable activity, one finds now that the sinking of hundreds of millions of dollars into a nonproductive investment [Government bonds] creates that mighty barrier which in Europe separates business and trade activity from the indolent rich who aid none, create nothing, and live only for their own enjoyment.

    Obviously, then, we also, in this country, have the Same kind of dronish capitalism which is fought by the socialists in Europe. In our still young western communities, this form of capitalism seemed not to have developed very far, since the capitalist appeared to be merely a successful worker.

    3

    Even in France the conversion of five per cent interest-bearing Government bonds into a four and one-half per cent issue was given up, but in the United States such a change proved feasible.

    Developments may even show that social misery will follow our Government's splendid present financial achievement, because this achievement contained the germ of catastrophe and peril which future generations must combat.

    What we have said....regarding the hoarded money of the wealthy people who invest their funds in four per cent securities instead of in commercial enterprises, has also found acceptance in ...

    German
    I E
  • Jewish Advance -- January 17, 1879
    (No headline)

    Alderman Jonas' institution, the free lodging house, which was opened on the first day of the new year, on corner Wells and Indiana Sts., is getting on prosperously. Since it was started there has been a nightly increase of applicants, and on the 11th of this month, they numbered 90. The place is kept in very good order, loud talking and drunkenness being prohibited. At night the men are given bread and meat, and in the morning a bowl of soup and a large piece of bread. Up to a few days ago the whole weight of this work rested upon Alderman Jonas' shoulders; this benevolent son of Israel spending much money of his own to maintain this institution, and we are glad to learn that another co-religionist, Mr. Ludwing has interested himself in this charitable institution. This house will be kept up during the entire Winter.

    Alderman Jonas' institution, the free lodging house, which was opened on the first day of the new year, on corner Wells and Indiana Sts., is getting on prosperously. Since it ...

    Jewish
    II D 10, I F 5, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 17, 1879
    Session of the School Board

    A special session of the School Board was held yesterday; Mr. Wells presided. The following gentlemen were also present: Messrs. Hoyne, English, Jacobs, Pruessing, Stone, [Wilhelm] Vocke, Brennan, Bartlett, and Frankenthal.

    Several unimportant matters were settled. Mr. Pruessing told the meeting that there are 2,140 students of the German language among the pupils of both sexes.

    Bartlett made a motion that the estimates of various committees for special teachers be accepted; special instructors for deaf-mutes were included in these estimates.

    Stone made a motion to eliminate an appropriation for $1,500--the amount 2required to pay the salary of a special teacher of the German language. Experience has shown that including German in the school curriculum is a mistake. In 1865 the School Board decided to give instruction in German a trial at the Washington School. At that time the German class contained one hundred and fifteen pupils; now the class has decreased to fifty-six pupils. And this is true of the progress of the German language in all schools. In the twelve largest schools, ten years ago, 3,065 children were studying the German language; today these classes have an enrollment of about 1,108.

    The speaker then read a part of an article (which he had written) which appeared in the Daily News about a year ago. In this article German instruction is regarded as superfluous, expensive, and useless. In his article stone concluded that the Germans themselves prefer that the subject be dropped in the schools, because they realize that money spent on this language is wasted.

    Bartlett called attention to the fact that Stone's remarks were out of order 3and that only the sanction of the motion could be considered.

    Vocke took up the cudgel in behalf of German and said that Mr. Stone could hardly prove his assertions. He said that the German taxpayers, without exception, want their children to learn the German language; he said that he, himself would teach German to his children--or have them taught--because knowledge of another language besides one's native tongue is desirable and advantageous. A general education requires that one be familiar with at least two languages, to provide a comparison by which one may acquire an adequate understanding of expressions. The speaker then cited the importance of studying German and showed the necessity of studying this language in conjunction with English.

    The limited success of the teaching of the German language in Chicago can only be blamed upon the restrictions which were placed on the School Board committee.

    4

    If Vocke's proposals had been accepted, better results would soon have been apparent.

    Pruessing then added that Mr. Stone had made no reference to the children who study German in the elementary schools. The number of these students is also reduced, because the School Board passed a resolution that German shall not be taught at a public school unless one hundred and fifty parents request this subject by petition.

    English, offering a substitute measure for Stone's motion, asked that all appropriations for German instruction, drawing, and music be dropped; he added that it is necessary to provide a general education before spending money for special branches.

    Jacobs expressed similar views.....A vote killed the substitute measure of English.

    5

    Stone's motion was then voted upon, and the motion was defeated seven--Hoyne, English, Pruessing, Vocke, Bartlett, Frankenthal and President Wells--to two--Jacobs and Stone.

    Thereafter.....bickering followed on the subject of appropriations for special branches...

    A special session of the School Board was held yesterday; Mr. Wells presided. The following gentlemen were also present: Messrs. Hoyne, English, Jacobs, Pruessing, Stone, [Wilhelm] Vocke, Brennan, Bartlett, and ...

    German
    I A 1 b, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 20, 1879
    Ziegenmeyer Has He the Right to Executive Clemency?

    Ziegenmeyer was given a life sentence for the murder in 1871 of Gumbleton, an Irishman, and, as previously reported, efforts are being made in certain quarters to obtain a gubernatorial pardon. However, Joseph Dixon, through whose particular activity Ziegenmeyer was apprehended and convicted, strenuously objects to any movement favoring a lesser punishment.

    As the nationality of the convicted man is likely to arouse especial interest among the readers of the Illinois Staats-Zeitung, a resume may be justified. The following compilation of facts is based on Chicago newspaper reports about the murder trial and Dixon's verbal statements.

    Alfred Ziegenmeyer was born in Brunswick in 1850, an illegitimate son of a tavernkeeper's daughter. His father, supposedly, was a noble merchant. His mother received a very fair cash settlement and then married Ziegenmeyer, a sugar refiner, who settled in Wolfenbuettel, Brunswick, where he followed his 2vocation. Alfred adopted his stepfather's name, obtained good schooling, and then became an apprentice to a merchant.

    From early youth Alfred Ziegenmeyer was regarded as a ne'er-do-well, and he fully lived up to his reputation by stealing from his principal and others. There-upon he was sent to sea and thus became a sailor on the "Forelle," a vessel hailing from the city of Bremen. In 1870 he left his ship while in Baltimore, and shortly after made the acquaintance of a prosperous gentleman who had recently arrived from Ireland, William Gumbleton, who interested himself in the young German and became his benefactor. Gumbleton gave Ziegenmeyer an opportunity to learn telegraphy and made him his confident. The former was a man of considerable means and his funds were made available by letters of credit. It was proven that Ziegenmeyer often tried to induce Gumbleton to change his letters of credit into liquid funds, but the latter's bankers advised against such a procedure until Gumbleton had definite use for his money. In November, 1870, the two did not live together.

    On November 16, Ziegenmeyer told the landlord that he had found a job in Richmond, Virginia, and that he was to leave for that destination; then he hired an expressman 3to take his belongings to the railroad station, but prior to that he had the teamster stop at Gumbleton's address, where the latter joined them and added his luggage. Using two railroad tickets for Chicago which Ziegenmeyer had purchased ahead of time, he and Gumbleton departed on the evening of November 16. On the morning of the same day, Gumbleton had sent a large part of his effects by express to Manhattanville, Kansas, where he intended to settle.

    They arrived in this city (Chicago) on November 19, and stopped at a lodginghouse at 10 West Randolph Street. On the evening of November 21, both were in a basement saloon at the corner of State and Madison Streets. Ziegenmeyer remained sober but encouraged Gumbleton to drink until he was so intoxicated that he could scarcely mount the stairs when the tavern's closing hour necessitated departure. Both were observed walking toward the lake shore, and that was the last time Gumbleton was seen alive. Ziegenmeyer returned to his lodging house at about one o'clock.

    The next day Ziegenmeyer paid the bill and told the lodginghouse keeper that his companion departed suddenly for New York and that he himself intended to 4follow him. A few hours later Ziegenmeyer rented a place on Dearborn Street, representing himself as William Gumbleton. He tried to cash a deposit slip for three hundred dollars which Gumbleton had obtained at the bank in the presence of Ziegenmeyer on the day after their arrival in Chicago. Ziegenmeyer was informed that Gumbleton would have to affix his signature before the money could be paid, whereupon Ziegenmeyer said he would send the paper to New York, Gumbleton's present address, and that the gentleman had left the slip for Ziegenmeyer to cash. Six days later Ziegenmeyer appeared again at the bank with the apparently proper signature and received three hundred dollars.

    In the interim he wrote--as Gumbleton--to the banking house of Blake Brothers and Company in New York, where Gumbleton had $7,981 on deposit, and received this amount on December 15, through the Traders' Bank, where he also introduced himself as Gumbleton, On the same day he left for Kansas, as the people he rented from believed.

    Ziegenmeyer also appeared at the United States Express Company, pretending to 5be Gumbleton, and ordered Gumbleton's effects, which were sent by this Company from Baltimore to Kansas, to be forwarded to Chicago. The various articles he disposed of, in part, at a pawnshop on Wells Street, where he also bought a hook for a silver chain which later proved to be the property of Gumbleton.

    On January 3, 1871,Gumbleton's body was found in Lake Michigan, near the foot of Madison Street. The fact that the clothing bore evidence of prosperity, that a watch was missing, a buttonhole of the vest torn, an inner pocket of the vest turned wrong side out, indicated murder and robbery. Papers in another vest pocket established the identity of Gumbleton.

    Joseph Dixon investigated, and at the very beginning uncovered the fact that a young man whose description did not correspond.at all with the appearance of the dead man, was impersonating Gumbleton. Dixon made it his business to find this young man, and followed the trail backwards--to Baltimore, where he found a photograph of Ziegenmeyer, which the bank officials and the landlady identified as Gumbleton. Through a former sailor of the "Forelle," Dixon obtained 6additional information about Ziegenmeyer and ascertained that he must have relatives in Brunswick; at least money was sent there.

    In the interinm inquiries were made about Gumbleton's relatives and they were located, living in Cork, Ireland. On the strength of all this, Dixon obtained a warrant for murder, and procured extradition papers which were sent to the General Consulate in Berlin. In the early part of April, Ziegenmeyer was arrested in Brunswick.

    [Before this] Ziegenmeyer had returned in January to his native land a rich man. He gave seven thousand thalers to his stepfather, supposedly the result of a fortunate speculation in railroads. Ziegenmeyer kept about two thousand thalers for himself, using it to take refuge in every conceivable technicality to balk the extradition proceedings. Meanwhile, Dixon had traveled to Germany. He arrested his man on May 3.

    Ziegenmeyer was brought to Chicago, admitted forgery but obstinately denied the 7murder. Gumbleton fell accidentally into the lake and drowned; fearing difficulties, he[Ziegenmeyer]tried to conceal the truth. However, he[Ziegenmeyer] did not attempt to make restitution to Gumbleton's heirs. The latter, after a lengthy process, obtained the money from Blake Brothers.

    After a four-day trial Ziegenmeyer was convicted. Judge Booth declared, as he pronounced judgment, that from what was unearthed at the hearing, he regarded the defendant as a cold-blooded murderer, the worst in the annals of Cook County--there was no doubt about his guilt.

    This, briefly, constitutes the facts on the strength of which Ziegenmeyer was sent to the penitentiary.

    Joe Dixon asserts that the stolen money is being used to obtain a pardon, but does not think it will prove helpful; and, he declares, that the State's Attorney, Charles Reed, who conducted the trial, will also oppose a pardon petition.

    As Ziegenmeyer offered no defense, except his denial, and as a new trial was 8refused by the court, it appears very improbable that a pardon can be obtained because of any doubt of his guilt.

    Ziegenmeyer was given a life sentence for the murder in 1871 of Gumbleton, an Irishman, and, as previously reported, efforts are being made in certain quarters to obtain a gubernatorial ...

    German
    II E 2